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Mt Adams Zen Buddhist Temple

 

May 2015 Newsletter
 Dear Dharma Friends, 
   This time last year we lost 2 dear ones from our lives.  It brought to mind a quote from the Buddha:

THE FIVE REMEMBRANCES

1. I am of the nature to grow old. There is no way to escape growing old.
2. I am of the nature to have ill health. There is no way to escape having ill health.
3. I am of the nature to die. There is no way to escape Death.
4. All that is dear to me and everyone I love are of the nature to change. There is no way to
escape being separated from them. 

5. My actions are my only true belongings. I cannot escape the consequences of my actions. My actions are the ground on which I stand.  

 

This moment - right now - is the only time that we have.  Breathe in Breathe out - allow your mind to fill with only what is happening right now.  This is the joyful mindful practice that removes all suffering.  May all of us live well, laugh often, love much and awaken.    Kozen  Thich Minh Tinh 


Sunrise as we ended morning meditation.  Join us for our 6:30am meditation Tuesday - Saturday
2015 Retreats
May - 9 Buddha Day at CRCC (Prison Ministry - held off site)
June - 13 one Day retreat 9 am - 3 pm
July - 25 one day retreat
August - 1-2 Precepts retreat
September - TBA
October - 10 BodhiDharma Day - one day retreat with walking meditation
November 14 - one day retreat
December - none

Personal Retreat Space
We can now provide space for personal retreats.  During these retreats you may attend scheduled services if you wish but the remaining time is on your own.  We can provide simple vegetarian meals or you may do your own cooking.
"Behold, O monks, this is my last advice to you. All component things in the world are changeable. They are not lasting. Work hard to gain your own salvation." Buddha

The Buddha recommended 4 places to visit if we are sincere in our practice and we would follow his teachings:

Lumbini: birthplace (in Nepal)

Bodh Gaya: the place of his Enlightenment (in the current Mahabodhi Temple).

Sarnath: (formally Isipathana) where he delivered his first teaching.

Kusinara: (now Kushinagar, Uttar Pradesh, India) where he died.

Walking Meditation in the Labyrinth

Our Labyrinth is used by people of many faiths.  In this photo a Buddhist walking meditation is being done as part of our morning service.  We're all bundled up as it has been chilly in the mornings.  Please feel free to stop by and walk the labyrinth whenever you can - it is a most wonderful practice.

Just Being Exposed To Buddhist Ideas May Make You Feel More Compassionate, Study Finds

(from http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/04/08/buddhism-compassion_n_7011576.html

Buddhists are known for promoting a philosophy of nonviolence, compassion and the interconnection of all beings. According to provocative new research, simply being exposed to Buddhist terminology may be enough to activate tolerance and compassion among both Buddhists and non-Buddhists.

 

Researchers from Stanford University, along with scientists from Belgium and Taiwan, found that exposing people of different spiritual backgrounds to Buddhist concepts was effective in not only undercutting prejudice but also in promoting pro-sociality, which includes having a sense of responsibility for others, feelings of compassion and empathy.

 

The study, which was published in the April issue of the journal Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, illustrates a phenomenon known as priming. Priming occurs when people are exposed to certain words or images (in this case, Buddhist words) that then subconsciously influence their thinking or behavior.

 

For the experiment, 355 total study participants were divided based on their backgrounds: Western Christians, Westerners who practiced Buddhism and Taiwanese with a Buddhist/Taoist background. These three groups were broken down even further, with some participants being primed with religious words and others being exposed to nonreligious, yet still positive, words (e.g., "flower," "sun," "freedom"). After this priming, participants took tests designed to reveal any prejudices they may have against different ethnic or religious groups.

 

Across all groups, people who were exposed to words like "Buddha," "Dharma" and "awakening" in a word puzzle showed fewer negative associations with African and Muslim people than those who were exposed to Christian or nonreligious words.

 

Participants who were primed with Buddhist words also scored higher on a test measuring pro-social behaviors. These effects were particularly pronounced among people who scored higher on tests measuring open-mindedness.

Pro-social behaviors are generally in line with the core values of Buddhism, including tolerance of different ways of thinking, universality and interconnection.

 

However, the researchers don't mean to suggest that Buddhism is "better" than any other religion. "What we really want to argue is that Buddhist concepts are associated with tolerance, across cultural groups," Magalli Clobert, a post-doctoral student at Stanford and one of the study's authors, told The Huffington Post. "It means that, at least in people's mind, there is a positive vision of Buddhism as a religion of tolerance and compassion."

Breath

Counting the breaths is useful for those who have never worked with the breath much before. Sit down for meditation and fix your attention on the breath at that point where you most easily notice it. Very consciously watch the sequence of in-and-out breaths. Note the breath as it enters, and note the breath as it leaves, watching the movement of the body - the rise and fall of the abdomen. When you have established your awareness of the breath, begin counting each breath. This can be done in several ways. For this exercise count your inhalations as odd numbers and your exhalations as even numbers - go from 1 to 10 then start over. The counting provides a support for the mind; something a little more tangible to hold. If you aren't sure how far you have counted then you know that your mind has wandered; start the counting over again. Meditation is not about getting anything - and particularly, you don't have to get the breath . Just relax - and observe what you are experiencing.

Following the breath is used after the mind has been calmed somewhat by using counting or ongoing practice. When the mind is able to stay with the in-breathing and out-breathing, the counting can be stopped and replaced by just mentally following the course of the breath. Note the beginning of an in-breath -- hold your attention at the belly and observe the progress of the in-breath -- note the end of the in-breath -- notice the space, or pause at the end of the in-breath -- note the beginning of the out-breath. There is no thought involved here it is merely paying attention to the physical phenomenon of breathing - in detail.   

 

 

 

Learning to breathe through you belly 

Breath in - your belly should expand - you can feel it "push out".

 

Breath out - your belly should contract - you can feel it "pull in".

 

 

The only prayer you will ever need - Oprah Winfrey
In a recent article in the Huffington Post (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/04/24/oprah-winfrey-stanford-lecture_n_7139194.html?cps=gravity_2677_-5268393825528389930), Oprah Winfrey tells us that gratitude is the key for happiness.  "Thank you, Thank you, Thank you" she stated, is the best of all prayers.
We are a small Thien (Zen) Buddhist Temple practicing  "laughing farmer zen" - living our practice, sitting zazen, being here - right now!

Calendar

 

MAY

3 Buu Hung Monastery 

9 CRCC prison Wesak

8-10 NCNM

13 CRCC Meditation

15-17 Yoga Retreat 

10,17,24

Meditation at Trinity in Hood River

 

 

JUNE 

7 Buu Hung Monastery 

13 - one day retreat  

19-21 Summer Solstice - Druids  

23 CRCC Meditation 

14,21,28

Meditation at Trinity inHood River 

 

 

JULY   

5 Buu Hung Monastery   

1-6 Zikr Retreat

10-12 Heart Journey retreat 

25 - one day retreat  

12,19,26

Meditation at Trinity inHood River 

 

Mudras 
Each position of hands in Buddhist statuary represents an aspect of the Buddha's teachings.

Abhaya, Abhayadana Abhayaprada  "Fear Not" Converts jealousy and envy into all accomplishing wisdom.  An additional Tantric meaning is Green or North.

Semui-in (Abhaya) Mudra - Fear Not In Buddhist sculpture and painting throughout Asia, the Buddha Tathagata are generally depicted with a characteristic hand gesture known as a mudra. Mudras are used primarily to indicate the nature and function of the deity. They are also used routinely by current-day Japanese monks in their spiritual exercises and worship. Knowledge of these hand gestures can help greatly in identifying Buddha images (less so when trying to identify Bodhisattva images). But there is much variation and overlap among the mudra, and traditions in Japan differ from those in mainland Asia, so one should not depend exclusively on mudra for identification.
You can learn more from www.onmarkproductions.com/htm 
Join Us at
Buu Hung Monastery

the first Sunday of the month
at 3pm
17808 NE 18th St.
Vancouver WA 98684


Walking meditation


After services tea and social time

Buu Hung Monastery is a lovely temple in Vancouver WA.
It is about a 1.5 hour drive from Trout Lake, WA
Are You or your Sanga part of
the Northwest Dharma Association?


if not, it is time to join!  If you are a solitary practitioner or without a sanga you can still donate dana (money).  They are a clearing house for Buddhist Activity in the Northwest and need our support. Read more about the NWDA at http://www.northwestdharma.org 
Thay Nguyen Kim 
Thay was recently in the hospital in protective respiratory isolation.  He had pnuemonia. As you may know his white blood cell count is very very low
(his is below 1 and the normal is between 4 and 11 109/L). 
 Keep him in your thoughts. 
Nam M A Di Đ Phật 
"The practice of benefiting others is the total truth, thus it liberates self and others, far and wide.
To realize this is to serve friend and enemy equally and to see that even grasses and trees, wind and water, naturally reflect this sacred activity."                Zen Master Dogen
Thich Vinh Minh
Thay Vinh Minh has been visiting out temple for the last month. He will return to University in Thailand at the end of May.

Having a quiet lunch on the dock by the pond

Visiting the City of 10,000 Buddhas

Attending a Precepts Retreat

Giving a Dharma talk in English

  Thay Vinh Minh has completed his second year at Mahachulalongkornrajavidyalaya University in Thailand.  He plans to complete his BA in Buddhist Studies there, then go on to get his MA and PhD.   
  His English language skills are improving daily as he is getting a lot of practice  speaking with native speakers. Thay's goal is to be able to teach the Dharma in English and Vietnamese.   
 Hood River Meditation and Metta Practice  
We have a 1 hour Meditation and metta class on Sunday evenings at 6:00pm at Trinity Natural Medicine, 1808 Belmont Ave. Hood River.  Call for info 541.386.2025.  Trinity Natural Medicine offers acupuncture, Chinese medicine, yoga, martial arts training and more - visit their website http://www.trinitynaturalmedicine.org/ 
Cascade Mountain School
Cascade Mountain School is a Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) focused educational program for middle and high school students.  It is grounded in community and ecological standards. 
Trout Lake abbey hosted one group here last summer and the experience was wonderful
for the kids attending and our staff. 
Contact the school at
cascademountainschool.org or  541.645.0688

Community Plum Mountain Buddhist

May2015 Newsletter

 

 

Weekly Schedule: Daily 6:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Service with short recitation and half hour seated meditation, at 516 W. Cushing in Aberdeen. Our regular sangha meeting is each Tuesday evening from 6:30 pm to 8:00 pm. We do some movement and sitting meditation, with plenty of guidance for newcomers. Thay Kobai or a senior student gives a short talk on Buddhist principles followed by Q&A and discussion.

 

End of April Events

 

28 April, Tuesday: Community Meditation, 6:30 to 8:00 p.m. We do some simple movement and seated meditation, followed by a short talk and sandwich making for "Lunch Under the Bridge," tomorrow. Other details above.

 

29 April, Wednesday: Lunch Under the Bridge   Meet at 10 a.m. St. Andrew's Episcopal kitchen.

 

30 April, Thursday: Thay Kobai on Coffee Talk, 9:10 a.m. 1450AM or 100.5FM

 

May Events

 

1 to 3 May: Shorebird Festival, Hoquiam, WA  Link at: www.shorebirdfestival.com  

 

2 May: Sesshin, Open Gate ZC, Olympia Link at:www.boundlessmindzen.org

 

4 May Full Moon O

 

5 May, Tuesday: Community Meditation & Dedication of Lady Altar, 6:30 to 8:00 p.m. A special inter-faith evening to dedicate our new Lady Altar, including Kannon, Our Lady of Guadalupe and others. People of any or no faith are welcome. Special guests will include women clergy from the Grays Harbor Area. Finger foods and sparkling drinks provided.

 

9 May, Saturday: Buddha Day Clallam Bay Corrections Center

 

10 May, Sunday: Mothers' Day

 

10 May, Sunday: Prayer & Meditation Study Group, 4:30 pm to 6:00 pm. at 516 W. Cushing St. Aberdeen. A study group for those in recovery. We do a check-in, then meditate for 15 - 25 minutes, then read from and discuss our current text. We are beginning with the title Untethered Soul: A Journey Beyond Self by Michael A. Singer. People of any or no faith are welcome. No prior meditation experience is necessary.

 

 

12 May, Tuesday: Community Meditation, 6:30 to 8:00 p.m. We do some simple movement and seated meditation, followed by a short talk by a senior student and a Q&A discussion. People of any or no faith are welcome.

 

16 May, Saturday: Mindfulness in the Kitchen, 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Montesano Community Education at Montesano High School Home Economics Room. $11 fee. Register with MCE at: http://montecomm.blogspot.com/

 

17 May Sunday: New Moon

17 May Sunday: Prayer & Meditation Study Group, 4:30 pm to 6:00 pm. at 516 W. Cushing St. Aberdeen. A study group for those in recovery. We do a check-in, then meditate for 15 - 25 minutes, then read from and discuss our current text, which is: Untethered Soul: A Journey Beyond Self by Michael A. Singer. People of any or no faith are welcome. No prior meditation experience is necessary.

 

19 May, Inter-Faith Works Planning meeting, Olympia

 

19 May, Tuesday: Community Meditation, 6:30 to 8:00 p.m. We do some simple movement and seated meditation, followed by a short talk by Thay Kobai and a Q&A discussion. People of any or no faith are welcome. Check with Thay Kobai if you have questions.

 

24 May, Sunday: Prayer & Meditation Study Group, 4:30 pm to 6:00 pm. at 516 W. Cushing St. Aberdeen. A study group for those in recovery. We do a check-in, then meditate for 15 - 25 minutes, then read from and discuss our current text, which is: Untethered Soul: A Journey Beyond Self by Michael A. Singer. People of any or no faith are welcome. No prior meditation experience is necessary.

 

26 May, Tuesday: Community Meditation, 6:30 to 8:00 p.m. We do some simple movement and seated meditation, followed by a short talk by Thay Kobai and a Q&A discussion. People of any or no faith are welcome. Check with Thay Kobai if you have questions.

 

Future Events

 

5 June, Friday: Meditation for People Who Think They Can't Meditate. Montesano Library, Noon to 1:30 p.m. Register MCE $5.

 

30 June, Saturday: Summer Expo, Raymond, 11:00 to 3:00 p.m.

 

Some Dharma:

The illusion of self is so deep and so unshakeable that only persistent practice can break through. That's why the Pāli word virya is often used to refer to this effort. It means "heroic" or manly. It's where we get our word "virile." Because of this emphasis on sustained effort, the meditation schools (Ch'an, Zen, Tien etc.) can seem very severe. To lead the spiritual life, the life of the Noble Ones, the historical Buddha recommended three things: Renunciation, Restraint and Seclusion.

 

American Buddhists rebel against all three recommendations. We're not about to renounce our BMWs or our trophy antiques or redwood decks. I've even read the complaints of lay Buddhist teachers about not being supported at a level they want to be accustomed to. To me, taking up the Dharma means taking up the practice of renunciation. You eat whatever is put in your bowl.

 

Nor, as Americans, are we schooled in restraint. We know we have the right to believe or say or do anything we want, including carrying our guns to defend the property we allegedly own. Others tote spray paint cans to decorate boxcars or abandoned buildings.

 

Seclusion we kind of know about. We can go on vacation or to a spa. Or we can go backpacking and take wildlife photos. Alternatively, we can sign up for a retreat at an "Insight" center and have a comfy few days of semi-silence and excellent vegetarian food. But of course that eats up valuable vacation time.

 

We are living in a dual world of rich and poor. Some of us are powerful, wealthy, and connected and others of us are not. Yet if the traditions and methods of Buddhism are to survive intact, there has to be a sangha of renunciants - a group of people willing to dedicate themselves wholeheartedly to the Way. That's why this month I particularly celebrate the ordination of Chris Richards as a monastic in our Tien Tu tradition of Buddhism. It is a brave thing to do and it takes a lot of virya. His Dharma name is Ven. Tam Hy, which means "Joy in the Happiness of Others".

 

We are happy to be a member of the Northwest Dharma Association
and encourage you to consider joining.

We are also affiliated with Open Gate Zen Center in Olympia. For information on their programs go to www.boundlessmindzen.org.

If you do not want to receive this newsletter, please email info@plummountain.org

PO Box 487, Trout Lake WA 98650     www.MtAdamsZen.org

509.395.2030  (e-mail -put in the @ sign) kozen1 at embarqmail.com