Leadershipbydesign
News From LBD

March  2013 Volume 5 Issue 3
 

 

The Piano Story-

     A mother wished to encourage her small girl's interest in the piano and took her to a local concert featuring an excellent pianist. In the entrance foyer the mother met an old friend and the two stopped to talk. The little girl was keen to see inside the hall and so wandered off, unnoticed by her mother. The girl's mother became concerned when she entered the hall and could see no sign of her daughter. Staff members were notified and an announcement was made asking the audience to look out for the little lost girl. With the concert due to start, the little girl had still not been found. In preparation for the pianist's entrance, the curtains drew aside, to reveal the little girl sitting at the great piano, focused in concentration, quietly picking out the notes of 'Twinkle Twinkle Little Star'.

 

    The audience's amusement turned to curiosity when the pianist entered the stage, walked up to the little girl, and said "Keep playing."

 

    The pianist sat down beside her, listened for a few seconds, and whispered some more words of encouragement. He then began quietly to play a bass accompaniment, and then a few bars later reached around the little girl to add more accompaniment. At the end of the impromptu performance the audience applauded loudly as the pianist took the little girl back to her seat to be reunited with her mother. The experience was inspirational for everyone, not least the small girl.

 

    It takes just a few moments to make somebody's day, to help someone with their own personal aims and dreams - especially someone who looks up to you for encouragement and support. 

 

What Leaders are Reading   


Love 'em or Lose 'em: Getting Good People to Stay by Beverly Kaye and Sharon Jordan-Evans --

With replacement costs high and start-up time critical, employee retention is more valuable than ever. This best-selling guide provides 26 strategies to keep talented employees happy and productive. Citing research and experience with dozens of organizations, the authors present many examples of how today's companies have applied their retention strategies and increased their retention rates. The chapters are arranged alphabetically, from "Ask" to "Zenith."
  
  
Quick Team-Building Activities for Busy Managers by Brian Miller  -- 
 
Every group can benefit from team-building exercises. Supervisors, managers, and team leaders now have 50 team-building activities to choose from, all of which can be implemented with no special facilities, big expense, or previous training experience. Readers will find engaging exercises for building new teams and helping teams with new members, dealing with change, its effects and more. Instructions and tips for follow-up and variations are included for each activity and an additional chapter provides valuable advice for working through unexpected difficulties in team-building.

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 Leadership Tip of The Month  

  

Tips on Giving Encouragement

 

It is a truly wonderful thing to encourage those around you, but much of the time people just find reasons to fault others. The majority of the world is better at criticizing other people than building up their self-esteem. Giving others hope and staying positive are ways to make life better for everyone, including you.

 

   Telling someone that they are doing well in life, or they are a good person, is a great way to encourage. However, if you really want to improve someone's self-esteem, you should be more specific. This means that you should tell another person exactly why you are happy about the way they are acting or performing. This encourages the person to continue doing the right things, without focusing on the negative aspects of their activities.

 

The most obvious way to encourage another person is to tell them how you feel, and in doing so, boost their motivation levels. There are other ways to give encouragement, such as writing a note, letter or email to the person. Ensure that your note is positive and does not include any criticism. There is such a thing as constructive criticism, but you should leave this out of your note. 

  

For additional information contact LBD.
John Branstad   

John Branstad
 
Quote of the Month
  
""As Iron sharpens Iron, so one Man sharpens another."
 
Proverbs 27:17 
John Branstad
www.leadershipbydesign.org
763-213-5267