WCTN Telemedicine Network Monthly Newsletter
January 2014 Newsletter
Wesley Medical Center
In This Issue
WCTN Telemedicine Network: Year in Review
Help us Customize Telemedicine for you in 2014
Telemedicine: From Science Fiction to Essential Service

 

WCTN Telemedicine Network: Year in Review

 

2013 was an exciting year for Wesley Medical Center as it introduced the WesleyCare Telemedicine Network. WCTN is thrilled to be partnered with the following six facilities for Stroke Telemedicine:

  

Clara Barton Hospital, in Hoisington

Galichia Heart Hospital, in Wichita 

Hamilton County Hospital, in Syracuse

Neosho Memorial Regional Medical Center, in Chanute

Rice County District Hospital, in Lyons  

Rooks County Health Center, in Plainville

 

 

As you can see, we've been doing great things, and we can't do it without the services and support of many people. We are greatly appreciative of our physician and network partners, and look forward to continually expanding Telemedicine services in 2014.

 

  

 

 

Help us Customize Telemedicine for you in 2014
Please complete the 2013 End of Year Survey
  
You may have received an invitation, via e-mail and/or letter, to take part in an important WCTN Telemedicine Network survey. Your answers will be instrumental in helping us improve and customize the program for your facility in 2014. Please take a few minutes to complete that survey if you have not already done so. And if you have sent in your responses, Thank you!

 

 

 

 

Telemedicine: From Science Fiction to Essential Service

   

A doctor's diagnosis by radio
A doctor's diagnosis "by radio" on the cover of the February, 1925 issue of Science and Invention magazine

Would it surprise you to learn that Telemedicine was predicted almost 90 years ago?

In the February, 1925 issue of Science and Invention, author Hugo Gernsback, a pioneer in both radio and publishing, wrote an article outlining a device that, with video screens and remote control arms, would enable any doctor to make a virtual house call.

 

Gernsback's device was called the "teledactyl" and would allow doctors to not only see their patients through a viewscreen, but also touch them from miles away with spindly robot arms. He effectively predicted telemedicine, though with a weirder twist than we see implemented today.

 

Gernsback wrote:

The doctor of the future, by means of this instrument, will be able to feel his patient, as it were, at a distance....The doctor manipulates his controls, which are then manipulated at the patient's room in exactly the same manner. The doctor sees what is going on in the patient's room by means of a television screen...

 

The busy doctor, fifty years hence, will not be able to visit his patients as he does now. It takes too much time, and he can only, at best, see a limited number today. Whereas the services of a really big doctor are so important that he should never have to leave his office; on the other hand, his patients cannot always come to him. This is where the teledactyl and diagnosis by radio comes in.

(http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/telemedicine-predicted-in-1925-124140942/)

 

I wonder what Mr. Gernsback would have thought if he could see Telemedicine today. The potential applications are nearly limitless, allowing patients to receive quality, specialized care, regardless of their proximity to a major medical center. We are greatly appreciative of our network partners and look forward to continually expanding Telemedicine services to their communities.

  

 

 

WesleyCare Telemedicine NetworkMegan Canter

Director of Telemedicine

HCA Continental Division

4900 S Monaco Street, Suite 380

Denver, CO 80237-3487
303-788-2568 (ofc)

303-717-9995 (cell)

Megan.Canter@HCAHealthcare.com

 

 

 

 

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