Can Do Cover
   
Talkin' Trash Newsletter
Volume 17- Issue 2
Tri-County Resource & Waste Management Council




Providing recycling news for communities,
businesses and schools
  

In the Newsletter
Update on Proper Disposal of CFLs
Where to Recycle Batteries
Must Do Dates...
Where to Take Unwanted CFS, Meds and Batteries
 
America Recycles Day continues to be important by reminding us each year that even though recycling progress has been made, the United States generates more than 250 million tons of municipal solid waste - that's more than four pounds per person per day.  According to the Environmental Protection Agency, our nation has reached an overall recycling rate of 34.7%.  Each year, our national recycling rate:
  • saves the energy equivalent of 229 million barrels of oil;
  • saves the same amount of energy consumed by over 10 million U.S. households in a year; and 
  • avoids greenhouse gas emissions equivalent to removing more than 34 million cars from the road each year. 

But much more can be done. As consumers, we need to influence manufacturers through our purchasing power.  Supporting companies that use recycled packaging is one way of using our influence.  Here are other ways to continue closing the recycling loop:

  • recycle or compost whenever possible instead of throwing items away;
  • purchase items that are made from recycled materials;
  • reuse items and repair them instead of immediately replacing them;
  • purchase items with less packaging and in larger "economy" sizes; and 
  • donate unwanted items to charitable organizations. 

Blistering Pace Continues
 
The Tri-County Regional Collection Facility (TCRCF) continues its record setting pace for electronics from Fulton, Hancock, Henderson, Knox, McDonough, Mercer, Schuyler and Warren counties.  Through September, the facility has taken in 20.9% more electronics and 4.7% more paint than the same period last year.  With 563,085 pounds already collected in 2013, the TCRCF is on pace to surpass the 750,000 pound threshold!
 

 
 

U.S. EPA Guidelines for Cleaning
Up a Broken CFL 
C
Before Clean-up
  • Have people and pets leave the room;   
  • Air out the room for 5-10 minutes by opening a window or door to the outdoor environment;
  • Shut off the central forced air heating/air conditioning system, if you have one; and 
  • Collect materials needed to clean up the broken bulb.     
  1. Stiff paper or cardboard
  2. Sticky tape
  3. Damp paper towels or disposable wet wipes (for hard surfaces)
  4. A glass jar with a metal lid or a sealable plastic bag   

During Clean-up

  • DO NOT VACUUM. Vacuuming is not recommended unless broken glass remains after all other clean-up steps have been taken.  Vacuuming could spread mercury-containing powder or mercury vapor.  
  • Be thorough in collecting the broken glass and visible powder.  Scoop up glass fragments and powder using stiff paper or cardboard. Use sticky tape, such as duct tape, to pick up any remaining small glass fragments and powder.  Place the used tape in the glass jar or plastic bag.
  • Place clean-up materials in a sealable container.  

After Clean-up

Promptly place all bulb debris and clean-up materials, including vacuum cleaner bags, outdoors in a trash container or protected area untilmaterials can be disposed of.  Avoid leaving any bulb fragments or clean-up materials indoors.

  • Next, check with your local government about disposal  requirements in your area, because some localities require fluorescent bulbs (broken or unbroken) be taken to a local recycling center.  If there is no such requirement in your area, you can dispose of the materials with your household trash.
  • If practical, continue to air out the room where the bulb was broken and leave the heating/air conditioning system shut off for several hours.

Did You Know?

Linear fluorescent tubes, bug zappers, tanning bulbs, black lights, metal halide and high pressure sodium bulbs also contain mercury.  You should follow the same clean-up procedures listed above for CFLs.                                                                       Source: www.epa.gov

 

        cfl 4
THE TRI-COUNTY REGIONAL COLLECTION FACILITY
ACCEPTS CFLS

Click here for a complete list of drop-off sites in Illinois.

 
Click here for a complete list of drop-off sites in IllinoisArticle Headline
      WHERE TO RECYCLE BATTERIES
       
Batteries
The ends of household batteries need to be taped.
Masking tape works best.

It is not necessary to tape rechargeable batteries.
 To recycle your batteries, go to the following sites:
The Tri-County Resource & Waste Management Council (TCR&WMC) represents and meets the solid waste management needs of incorporated and unincorporated communities in McDonough, Mercer, and Warren counties.  The council's Solid Waste Coordinator provides a comprehensive approach to solid waste issues.  For more information about the TCR&WMC, call 309-331-4782. 
TCR&WMC logo
MUST DO....DATES
TCR&WMC 
November 25
Warren County Courthouse/Monmouth
7:00 pm

McDonough Co. Law & Legal Committee
 
November 4 
December 2 
McDonough Co. 
Courthouse/ Macomb 
7:00 pm 

Mercer Co. Board
 
November 5 
December 3 
Mercer County 
Courthouse/Aledo 
7:00 pm 

Mercer Co.
 
Recycling Board
January 23 
CES Office/Aledo 
7:00 pm 

Warren Co. Board
 
November 13 
December 18 
Warren County 
Courthouse/Monmouth 
9:30 am 
 
WHERE TO TAKE  UNWANTED MEDS FOR FREE DISPOSAL
CFL
CHECK THE LIST BELOW FOR  THE HEALTH DEPARTMENT CLOSEST TO YOU. TAKE ALL YOUR LOOSE MEDS IN A ZIP LOCK BAG.

Fulton Co. Health Dept.
Canton/309-647-1134

Hancock Co. Health Dept.
Carthage/1-800-422-8218

Henderson Co. Health Dept.
Gladstone/309-627-2812

Knox Co. Health Dept.
Galesburg/309-344-2224

McDonough Co. Health Dept.
Macomb/309-837-9951

Mercer Co. Health Dept.
Aledo/309-582-3761

Schuyler Co. Health Dept.
Rushville/217-322-4734

Warren Co. Health Dept.
Monmouth/309-734-1314

QUICK LINKS

TCR&WMC