Society of St. Vincent de Paul
Friday, July 15, 2016
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SEVENTEENTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME
July 24, 2016
 
Gospel: (Luke 11:1-13)

Jesus was praying in a certain place, and when he had finished, one of his disciples said to him, "Lord, teach us to pray as John taught his disciples." Jesus said to them, "When you pray, say: Father, hallowed be your name, your kingdom come.  Give us each our daily bread and forgive us our sins for we ourselves forgive everyone in debt to us, and do not subject us to the final test."
 
Reflection:
 
Jesus teaches us that in our prayer God is our "Father" and just as a parent's love for their children is unlimited, so is God's love and care for us unlimited. Jesus further teaches that prayer unfolds in the context of this special relationship of "Our Father," it is not a kinship or progeny. "Father" is a metaphor used to describe our unique, intimate relationship with God.  This relationship inspires us in us confidence with the realization that what we pray for is not so important as the fact that we address God in such intimate terms.  Prayer always deepens our relationship with God and this is already an answer to what we need. (Living Liturgy, p.180)
Vincentian Meditation:
 
"St. Teresa of Avila often could not finish the "Our Father" because she found that the first few words said everything.  What a rich word, "Father."  It brings to our minds what our own human fathers have done for us.  When you say "father," you think of one who provides, and the great provider for us all is God: "Our Father, Who is in heaven."  We can see many thingswrong with the world, but it is good to think of what is right in the world. Who made the sun to rise this morning? Who gives us the fruits of the earth and the rains to soften the soil? Who feeds the birds of the air and clothes the lilies of the field? God, our Father. We could continue making a long list of the good and beautiful things we can see with our eyes or hear with our ears in this world of ours, and all of them have come from God: Our Father, Who is in heaven. Who told us all this? Jesus Christ.  There are people who say that the most important truth that Jesus has taught us in the Gospels is that we have a Father in heaven and He is God." (McCullen, Deep Down Things, p. 471-2)
 
Discussion: (Share your thoughts after a moment of silence)

How have you found in your life that indeed God is your "Father?"
 
Closing Prayer:                                                                                            

With longing hearts we pray,
-God our Father, hear our prayer.
For those afflicted in body and spirit,
-God our Father, hear our prayer.
For those searching for a place to call home,
-God our Father, hear our prayer.
For those seeking for a God to believe and trust in,
-God our Father, hear our prayer. Amen



Please contact Mary Esther Jockers at jemmie57@sbcglobal.net or B.J. Polk at jrragman@aol.com if you would like to host a class or have any questions in regards to the training.

 
   
 

Click the Map Link above for the July 21st Training.  Please enter your location and you will be guided to the OLOG - Helotes House of Neighborly Service.  
There are burnt orange gates & fence at entrance.


The OLPH St Vincent De Paul in Selma, has introduced a Cash Flow Sheet to use with our brothers and sisters. During their third visit, we introduce the sheet to them. Each brother and sister are different. Some will decline intervention, some may take it home and some may show a real interest. Our goal is to make them aware of "wants" and "needs". We do not tell them they must stop buying something, we only plant the seed as a small step up the ladder, and out of severe poverty. We also link our Home Visit teams with the brothers and sisters who want more financial guidance than our volunteers can provide. A copy of the Cash Flow sheet is an attachment. We only ask our conference name be retained on the original. 

   
Free School Supplies!

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CJCLife Community Church located at 6401 Bandera Rd will be giving away FREE to the community:

Backpacks and School Supplies
Free Haircuts
New Shoes
Gently Used Cloths

Event will be held on Saturday July 16th from 9am - 1pm. Supplies will be given on a first come, first serve basis to school aged children. 

Child must be present to receive items.

For more information, please contact:
CJCLife Community Church
6401 Bandera Rd
San Antonio, TX 78238
210.724.3353


St. Matthew's Conference has clothes that they can donate weekly to your Conference.  The amount is enough to fill a pick-up truck.  If your Conference is in need and has transportation to pick up the clothing each week, please contact Jack Schlegel at (210) 478-5020.

    COPY PAPER BOXES NEEDED
The Council Office is in need of copy paper boxes for file storage.  If your Conference has any that they can spare, please contact Rachel Esposito at rachel.esposito@svdpsa.org. to coordinate a pick-up time.  Thank you!
SAINTS OF THE WEEK

Friday, July 15 - St. Bonaventure

Bonaventure, Franciscan, theologian, doctor of the Church, was both learned and holy. Because of the spirit that filled him and his writings, he was at first called the Devout Doctor; but in more recent centuries he has been known as the Seraphic Doctor after the "Seraphic Father" Francis because of the truly Franciscan spirit he possessed.

Born in Bagnoregio, a town in central Italy, he was cured of a serious illness as a boy through the prayers of Francis of Assisi. Later, he studied the liberal arts in Paris. Inspired by Francis and the example of the friars, especially of his master in theology, Alexander of Hales, he entered the Franciscan Order, and became in turn a teacher of theology in the university. Chosen as minister general of the Order in 1257, he was God's instrument in bringing it back to a deeper love of the way of St. Francis, both through the life of Francis which he wrote at the behest of the brothers and through other works which defended the Order or explained its ideals and way of life.


Saturday, July 16 - Our Lady of Mount Carmel

Hermits lived on Mount Carmel near the Fountain of Elijah in northern Israel in the 12th century. They had a chapel dedicated to Our Lady. By the 13th century they became known as "Brothers of Our Lady of Mount Carmel." They soon celebrated a special Mass and Office in honor of Mary. In 1726 it became a celebration of the universal Church under the title of Our Lady of Mount Carmel. For centuries the Carmelites have seen themselves as specially related to Mary. Their great saints and theologians have promoted devotion to her and often championed the mystery of her Immaculate Conception.

St. Teresa of Avila called Carmel "the Order of the Virgin." St. John of the Cross credited Mary with saving him from drowning as a child, leading him to Carmel, and helping him escape from prison. St. Therese of the Child Jesus believed that Mary cured her from illness. On her First Communion day, Therese dedicated her life to Mary. During the last days of her life she frequently spoke of Mary.

There is a tradition--which may not be historical--that Mary appeared to St. Simon Stock, a leader of the Carmelites, and gave him a scapular, telling him to promote devotion to it. The scapular is a modified version of Mary's own garment. It symbolizes her special protection and calls the wearers to consecrate themselves to her in a special way. The scapular reminds us of the gospel call to prayer and penance-a call that Mary models in a splendid way.


Sunday, July 17 - St. Francis Solano

Francis came from a leading family in Andalusia, Spain. Perhaps it was his popularity as a student that enabled Francis in his teens to stop two duelists. He entered the Friars Minor in 1570, and after ordination enthusiastically sacrificed himself for others. His care for the sick during an epidemic drew so much admiration that he became embarrassed and asked to be sent to the African missions. Instead he was sent to South America in 1589.

While working in what is now Argentina, Bolivia and Paraguay, Francis quickly learned the local languages and was well received by the indigenous peoples. His visits to the sick often included playing a song on his violin.

Around 1601 he was called to Lima, Peru, where he tried to recall the Spanish colonists to their baptismal integrity. Francis also worked to defend the indigenous peoples from oppression. He died in Lima and was canonized in 1726.


 
Monday, July 18 - St. Camillus de Lellis

Humanly speaking, Camillus was not a likely candidate for sainthood. His mother died when he was a child, his father neglected him, and he grew up with an excesive love for gambling. At 17 he was afflicted with a disease of his leg that remained with him for life. In Rome, he entered the San Giacomo Hospital for Incurables as both patient and servant, but was dismissed for quarrelsomeness after nine months. He served in the Venetian army for three years. Then in the winter of 1574, when he was 24, he gambled away everything he had-savings, weapons, literally down to his shirt. He accepted work at the Capuchin friary at Manfredonia, and was one day so moved by a sermon of the superior that he began a conversion that changed his whole life. 

He entered the Capuchin movitiate, but was dismissed because of the apparently incurable sore on his leg. After another stint of service at San Giacomo, he came back to the Capuchins, only to be dismissed again, for the same reason.

Again, back at San Giacomo, his dedication was rewarded by his being made superintendent. He devoted the rest of his life to the care of the sick, and has been named, along with St. John of God, patron of hospitals, nurses and the sick. With the advice of his friend St. Philip Neri, he studied for the priesthood and was ordained at the age of 34. Contrary to the advice of his friend, he left San Giacomo and founded a congregation of his own. As superior, he devoted much of his own time to the care of the sick.

Charity was his first concern, but the physical aspects of the hospital also received his diligent attention. He insisted on cleanliness and the technical competence of those who served the sick. The members of his community bound themselves to serve prisoners and persons infected by the plague as well as those dying in private homes. Some of his men were with troops fighting in Hungary and Croatia in 1595, forming the first recorded military field ambulance. In Naples, he and his men went onto the galleys that had plague and were not allowed to land. He discovered that there were people being buried alive, and ordered his brothers to continue the prayers for the dying 15 minutes after apparent death.

He himself suffered the disease of his leg through his life. In his last illness he left his own bed to see if other patients in the hospital needed help.

Tuesday, July 19 - St. Mary MacKillop

If St. Mary MacKillop were alive today, she would be a household name. It's not that she sought the limelight. On the contrary, she simply wanted to serve the poor wherever she found them in her native Australia. But along the way, she managed to arouse the ire of some rather powerful churchmen. One even excommunicated her for a time. 

Born in Melbourne in 1842 to parents who had emigrated from Scotland, Mary grew up in a family that faced constant financial struggles. As a young woman she was drawn to religious life but could not find an existing order of Sisters that met her needs. In 1860 she met Father Julian Woods, who became her spiritual director. Together they founded a new community of women-the Sisters of St. Joseph of the Sacred Heart, also known as the Josephite Sisters. Its members were to staff schools especially for poor children, as well as orphanages, and do other works of charity.

As the congregation grew, so did Mary MacKillop's problems. Her priest-friend proved unreliable in many ways and his responsibilities for direction of the Sisters were removed. Meanwhile, Mary had the support of some local bishops as she and her Sisters went about their work. But the bishop in South Australia, aging and relying on others for advice, briefly excommunicated Mary-charging her with disobedience-and dispensed 50 of her Sisters from their vows. In truth, the bishop's quarrel was about power and who had authority over whom. He ultimately rescinded his order of excommunication. 

Mary insisted that her congregation should be governed by an elected mother general answerable to Rome, not to the local bishop. (There were also disputes about whether or not the congregation could own property.) In the end, Rome proved to be Mary's best source of support. After a long wait, official approval of the congregation-and how it was to be governed-came from Pope Leo XIII. 

Despite her struggles with Church authorities, Mary MacKillop and her Sisters were able to offer social services that few, if any, government agencies in Australia could. They served Protestants and Catholics alike. They worked among the aborigines. They taught in schools and orphanages and served unmarried mothers. 

Money, actually the lack of it, was a constant worry. But the Sisters, who begged from door to door, were bolstered by faith and by the conviction that their struggles were opportunities to grow closer to God. 

By the time Mary was approaching the end of her life, the congregation was thriving. She died in 1909 at the age of 67. Pope John Paul II beatified her in 1995. In 2010, when Pope Benedict XVI canonized her, she became Australia's first saint. 


Wednesday, July 20 - St. Apollinaris

According to tradition, St. Peter sent Apollinaris to Ravenna, Italy, as its first bishop. His preaching of the Good News was so successful that the pagans there beat him and drove him from the city. He returned, however, and was exiled a second time. After preaching in the area surrounding Ravenna, he entered the city again. After being cruelly tortured, he was put on a ship heading to Greece. Pagans there caused him to be expelled to Italy, where he went to Ravenna for a fourth time. He died from wounds received during a savage beating at Classis, a suburb of Ravenna. A beautiful basilica honoring him was built there in the sixth century.

Thursday, July 21 - St. Lawrence of Brindisi

At first glance perhaps the most remarkable quality of Lawrence of Brindisi is his outstanding gift of languages. In addition to a thorough knowledge of his native Italian, he had complete reading and speaking ability in Latin, Hebrew, Greek, German, Bohemian, Spanish and French.

He was born on July 22, 1559, and died exactly 60 years later on his birthday in 1619. His parents William and Elizabeth Russo gave him the name of Julius Caesar, Caesare in Italian. After the early death of his parents, he was educated by his uncle at the College of St. Mark in Venice.

When he was just 16 he entered the Capuchin Franciscan Order in Venice and received the name of Lawrence. He completed his studies of philosophy and theology at the University of Padua and was ordained a priest at 23.

With his facility for languages he was able to study the Bible in its original texts. At the request of Pope Clement VIII, he spent much time preaching to the Jews in Italy. So excellent was his knowledge of Hebrew, the rabbis felt sure he was a Jew who had become a Christian.

In 1956 the Capuchins completed a 15-volume edition of his writings. Eleven of these 15 contain his sermons, each of which relies chiefly on scriptural quotations to illustrate his teaching.

Lawrence's sensitivity to the needs of people-a character trait perhaps unexpected in such a talented scholar-began to surface. He was elected major superior of the Capuchin Franciscan province of Tuscany at the age of 31. He had the combination of brilliance, human compassion and administrative skill needed to carry out his duties. In rapid succession he was promoted by his fellow Capuchins and was elected minister general of the Capuchins in 1602. In this position he was responsible for great growth and geographical expansion of the Order.

Lawrence was appointed papal emissary and peacemaker, a job which took him to a number of foreign countries. An effort to achieve peace in his native kingdom of Naples took him on a journey to Lisbon to visit the king of Spain. Serious illness in Lisbon took his life in 1619.




Does your Conference have any news, events, or any other information that you would like to share in the Friday Five? **Please note, that events can be advertised if they ONLY support the SVDP Conference.  Any events that are put on by a parish can no longer be advertised.**

If so, please email Rachel Esposito at rachel.esposito@svdpsa.org to be include in the next edition of the Friday  Five! All information must be submitted by 3:00 pm on Wednesday. Thank you. 

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Please continue prayers for Council Treasurer, Langston Rodge, during his difficult illness. 

Please continue praying for Yolanda and Ramiro Ramirez, Angela Angel and Gloria de Luna,  all from St. Ann's Conference  who are experiencing health issues.