Society of St. Vincent de Paul
Friday, May 6, 2016

PENTECOST
May 15, 2016

Gospel: (John 14:15-16; 23-26)

Jesus said to his disciples, "If you love me, you will keep my commandment. And I will ask the Father, and he will give you another Advocate to be with you always. Whoever loves me will keep my word, and my Father will love him, and we will come to him and make our dwelling with him.... I have told you this while I am with you. The Advocate, the Holy Spirit whom the Father will send in my name, will teach you everything and remind you of all that I told you."

Reflection:

By this indwelling of the Holy Spirit we ourselves become advocates of God's presence for others. This gift of the Spirit, then, makes its demands on us. We must monitor the way we live so that others truly see us as advocates of God's presence bringing new life. This new life that we share with others might be so simple as a reassuring touch or helping hand, or as demanding as giving of our time and money. Living the paschal mystery means that we bask in the good gift of God's life that the Spirit brings. Pentecost is a celebration of both the gift of the Spirit and the effects of that gift-we are sharers in the one body of Christ who take up Jesus'mission to preach the good news of salvation. (Living Liturgy, p.140)

Vincentian Meditation:

One of the messages which the Church received from the Spirit of God at the Vatican Council II was that it should do more for the poor of the world. Over the past fifty years the Church has increased her interest in the poor. Not only has the Church tried to lighten the sufferings of the poor, but she has tried to be more efficient in bringing the Good News of Jesus Christ and His Church to the poor. Pope John Paul II has said, "He who lacks material resources may be poor, but he who does not know the way which God marks out for him is even poorer. "What does it profit a man," asks Our Lord, "if he gains the whole world and suffers the loss of his soul?"(Mk 8:36) What, my dear friends, will it profit us if we gain the whole world for the poor, but do not help them to find the way which will lead them to God and the happiness of heaven? (McCullen, Deep Down Things, p. 255)

Discussion: (Share your thoughts after a moment of silence)

How do we help the poor to find the way which will lead them to God?

Closing Prayer:

Seeking the grace of the Holy Spirit, we pray,
-Come, Holy Spirit
That the winds of Pentecost may move us to deeds of love,
-Come, Holy Spirit
That the fire of Pentecost may breathe new hope into the hopeless,
-Come, Holy Spirit
That we may lead the poor to find their way to God,
-Come, Holy Spirit Amen.

 


Thank you to everyone who GAVE BIG to the SVDP during the  Big Give SA on May 3rd and May 4th. 
Because of your generosity, we were able to raise $5,512.00 to assist our Brothers and Sisters in need!
  


clothes 2013
St. Ann's Conference is in dire need of Men's Jeans.  I you have any that you can donate, please drop them off at the St. Ann's Conference during the following times: 

Monday, Wednesday & Friday
11:00 am - 1:00pm

SAINTS OF THE WEEK



Friday, May 6 - Blessed Gerard of Lunel

Gerard, born into a noble family in southern France, showed an early inclination to piety-so much so that he received the habit of the Third Order of St. Francis at the age of five. When he was 18, Gerard and his brother, Effrenaud, hid themselves in a cave on the banks of a river and began two years of living as hermits. Both brothers then decided to go on a pilgrimage, in part to discourage the many visitors to the hermitage who had heard of their reputation for holiness. Making their way to Rome on foot, they spent two years there, visiting its many famous churches and shrines.

They intended to continue to Jerusalem, but Gerard collapsed on the way. While his brother went to seek help, he left Gerard in a simple cottage near Montesanto, Italy, but Gerard expired before his brother's return.
Many miracles are said to have taken place at Gerard's tomb, making it a favorite place of pilgrimage. People who were afflicted with headaches or subject to epilepsy experienced special relief through his intercession. The city of Montesanto has long venerated Blessed Gerard as its principal patron. He is sometimes known as Gery, Gerius or Roger of Lunel.

Saturday, May 7 - St. Rose Venerini

Rose was born at Viterbo in Italy, the daughter of a doctor. Following the death of her fiancÚ she entered a convent, but soon returned home to care for her newly widowed mother. Meanwhile, Rose invited the women of the neighborhood to recite the rosary in her home, forming a sort of sodality with them.

 
As she looked to her future, Rose, under the spiritual guidance of a Jesuit priest, became convinced that she was called to become a teacher in the world rather than a contemplative nun in a convent. Clearly, she made the right choice: She was a born teacher, and the free school for girls she opened in 1685 was well received.
Soon the cardinal invited her to oversee the training of teachers and the administration of schools in his Diocese of Montefiascone. As Rose's reputation grew, she was called upon to organize schools in many parts of Italy, including Rome. Her disposition was right for the task as well, for Rose often met considerable opposition but was never deterred.

She died in Rome in 1728, where a number of miracles were attributed to her. She was beatified in 1952 and canonized in 2006. The sodality, or group of women she had invited to prayer, was ultimately given the rank of a religious congregation. Today, the so-called Venerini Sisters can be found in the United States and elsewhere, working among Italian immigrants.

Sunday, May 8 - St. Peter of Tarentaise

There are two men named St. Peter of Tarentaise who lived one century apart. The man we honor today is the younger Peter, born in France in the early part of the 12th century. (The other man with the same name became Pope Innocent the Fifth.)

The Peter we're focusing on became a Cistercian monk and eventually served as abbot. In 1142, he was named archbishop of Tarentaise, replacing a bishop who had been deposed because of corruption. Peter tackled his new assignment with vigor. He brought reform into his diocese, replaced lax clergy and reached out to the poor. He visited all parts of his mountainous diocese on a regular basis.

After about a decade as bishop Peter "disappeared" for a year and lived quietly as a lay brother at an abbey in Switzerland. When he was "found out," the reluctant bishop was persuaded to return to his post. He again focused many of his energies on the poor.

Peter died in 1175 on his way home from an unsuccessful papal assignment to reconcile the kings of France and England.


Monday, May 9 - St. John of Avila

Born in the Castile region of Spain, John was sent at the age of 14 to the University of Salamanca to study law. He later moved to Alcala, where he studied philosophy and theology before his ordination as a diocesan priest. 

After John's parents died and left him as their sole heir to a considerable fortune, he distributed his money to the poor. In 1527, he traveled to Seville, hoping to become a missionary in Mexico. The archbishop of that city persuaded him to stay and spread the faith in Andalusia (southwestern Spain). During nine years of work there, he developed a reputation as an engaging preacher, a perceptive spiritual director and a wise confessor. 

Because John was not afraid to denounce vice in high places, he was investigated by the Inquisition but was cleared in 1533. He later worked in Cordoba and then in Granada, where he organized the University of Baeza, the first of several colleges run by diocesan priests who dedicated themselves to teaching and giving spiritual direction to young people. 
 
He was friends with Sts. Francis Borgia, Ignatius of Loyola, John of God, John of the Cross, Peter of Alcantara, and Teresa of Avila. John of Avila worked closely with members of the Society of Jesus and helped their growth within Spain and its colonies. John's mystical writings have been translated into several languages. 

He was beatified in 1894, canonized in 1970, and declared a doctor of the Church on October 7, 2012. 


Tuesday, May 10 - St. Damien de Veuster of Moloka'i

When Joseph de Veuster was born in Tremelo, Belgium, in 1840, few people in Europe had any firsthand knowledge of leprosy (Hansen's disease). By the time he died at the age of 49, people all over the world knew about this disease because of him. They knew that human compassion could soften the ravages of this disease.

Forced to quit school at age 13 to work on the family farm, Joseph entered the Congregation of the Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary six years later, taking the name of a fourth-century physician and martyr. When his brother Pamphile, a priest in the same congregation, fell ill and was unable to go to the Hawaiian Islands as assigned, Damien quickly volunteered in his place. In May 1864, two months after arriving in his new mission, Damien was ordained a priest in Honolulu and assigned to the island of Hawaii.

In 1873, he went to the Hawaiian government's leper colony on the island of Molokai, set up seven years earlier. Part of a team of four chaplains taking that assignment for three months each year, Damien soon volunteered to remain permanently, caring for the people's physical, medical and spiritual needs. In time, he became their most effective advocate to obtain promised government support.

Soon the settlement had new houses and a new church, school and orphanage. Morale improved considerably. A few years later he succeeded in getting the Franciscan Sisters of Syracuse, led by Mother Marianne Cope (January 23), to help staff this colony in Kalaupapa.

Damien contracted Hansen's disease and died of its complications. As requested, he was buried in Kalaupapa, but in 1936 the Belgian government succeeded in having his body moved to Belgium. Part of Damien's body was returned to his beloved Hawaiian brothers and sisters after his beatification in 1995.
Damien was canonized by Pope Benedict XVI on October 11, 2009.

When Hawaii became a state in 1959, it selected Damien as one of its two representatives in the Statuary Hall at the U.S. Capitol.


Wednesday, May 11 - St. Ignatius of Laconi

Ignatius is another sainted begging brother.

He was the second of seven children of peasant parents in Sardinia. His path to the Franciscans was unusual. During a serious illness, Ignatius vowed to become a Capuchin if he recovered. He regained his health but ignored the promise. A riding accident prompted him to renew the pledge, which he acted on the second time; he was 20 then. Ignatius's reputation for self-denial and charity led to his appointment as the official beggar for the friars in Cagliari. He fulfilled that task for 40 years; he was blind the last two years.

While on his rounds, Ignatius would instruct the children, visit the sick and urge sinners to repent. The people of Cagliari were inspired by his kindness and his faithfulness to his work. He was canonized in 1951.


Thursday, May 12 - Sts. Nereus and Achilleus

Devotion to these two saints goes back to the fourth century, though almost nothing is known of their lives. They were praetorian soldiers of the Roman army, became Christians and were removed to the island of Terracina, where they were martyred. Their bodies were buried in a family vault, later known as the cemetery of Domitilla. Excavations by De Rossi in 1896 resulted in the discovery of their empty tomb in the underground church built by Pope Siricius in 390.

Two hundred years after their death, Pope Gregory the Great delivered his 28th homily on the occasion of their feast. "These saints, before whom we are assembled, despised the world and trampled it under their feet when peace, riches and health gave it charms."




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Please continue praying for Yolanda and Ramiro Ramirez, Angela Angel and Gloria de Luna,  all from St. Ann's Conference  who are experiencing health issues.