August 15th, 2016

Dear Friends,

Here is the 168th issue of our weekly gardening newsletter for Houston, the Gulf Coast and beyond. We really appreciate all of our readers hanging in there with us, sharing stories and inspiring us in so many ways. 
 
Thanks so much!
 
This newsletter is a project of The Lazy Gardener, Brenda Beust Smith, John Ferguson and Mark Bowen (John and Mark are with Nature's Way Resources). We also have a great supporting cast of contributing writers and technical specialists who will chime in and tweak away regularly. We would love to keep receiving your input on this newsletter . . . . comments . . . . suggestions . . . . questions. . . .Email your thoughts to: lazygardenerandfriends@gmail.com. Thanks so much for your interest.
 
Please  or sign yourself up to receive this newsletter by clicking the "Join Our Mailing List" link just below. We will never sell or share our mailing list to protect the privacy of our subscribers.

Enjoy!

 





IKE + NEIL + GRAPES + OAK ISLAND-TOUGH FOLKS = LUCY TIME!   
  
"Hands, touching hands, reaching out, touching me, touching you . . . "  

             -- Neil Diamond, "Sweet Caroline" 
 

By BRENDA BEUST SMITH  
 
 
The most amazing part about visiting the fun gardens around the Frascone Winery & Bistro in Oak Island is realizing less than a decade ago, this picturesque little Trinity Bay fishing village had just been turned into one huge sand bar covered with unimaginable devastation.
 
In 2008, Hurricane Ike hit this usually halcyon community, just east of historic Anahuac, totally wiping out over half the houses, businesses and fishing camps, including James Frascone's home, tiny winery, grape orchard and other plantings. 

But he never even considered leaving. He loves the peace and quiet and so do his grapes.
 
   
Today, thanks to singer Neil Diamond, Jim and his life partner Suong (Kathy to her friends) have a lovely new home and winery, left above, with thriving gardens that should be even more eye-catching in time for the big October Gulf Coast Mead Festival.

Back in 2008, not too long after Ike hit, Neil Diamond was performing in Houston. He asked to see some of the hurricane devastation and was taken to Oak Island, one of the hardest-hit, yet-then-accessible sites.  After meeting with residents, some of whom were sleeping in tents and cars, Brooklyn-born Diamond promised to donate 100% of merchandise sales at his next 20 concerts to help fund the rebuilding. He kept that promise, raising over $1 million. 

Today Oak Island (technically it is an island, if you count bayous) retains its "fishing village" atmosphere, with obviously new homes under trees still ornamented with Ike debris in the highest branches. And, in October, another celebrity will be "channeled" with an honest-to-gosh Lucy-style grape stomp competition at the Winery.

Co-sponsored by Mystic Oak Meadery (mysticoak@yahoo.com) and Bentley Bees and Crane Meadows , the family-orientated, Saturday, Oct. 29, Gulf Coast Mead Fest & Grape Stomp will give potential grape growers a chance to meet and learn from some pretty special gardeners and vintners -- and sample wines, of course, along with other activities.

Frascone flowers bloom amid the grapes, l to r, bottlebrush, roses (who do double duty),
blue potato vine (Solanum) and, on vines, squash flowers including this bitter melon (Momordica)
 
 
The blooms and bountiful produce Jim and his life partner Suong (Kathy to her friends) grow are a testimony not only to plants that will survive in this kind of recovering ecology but to the stubborn determination of those who like to garden. 

Pre-Ike, James says, they grew grapes on trellises attached to the sides of their old house and on a lattice trellis arbor, so they could stand underneath to harvest. Today they grow grapes on lateral wire trellises with drip irrigation that allow for more production by easier control of lateral branching. They average 10-12 pounds of grapes per plant. 

Pre-Ike they grew the super-tough native Muscadine grapes (mainly the cultivars 'Carlos' and 'Black Beauty'). Now they grow 'Blanc-du-bois,' a French white, and 'Black Spanish,' a red.  Both were bred to stand coastal challenges, strong winds, salt spray and threatening storms. 

Before Ike, James recalls, smiling, "We just let nature take its course. Muscadines only needed a little fertilizer once in a while." Now he regularly uses Bio-Wash and is rewarded greater and better production. 
 
To those who would like to get into grape growing, James offers this advice:
  • Find a vineyard close to you and join in the pruning usually the end of January or February to get  cuttings
  • Check classified ads too for vines for sale
  • Root these cutting. These should turn into beautiful grape vines that will endure
  • His favorite varieties now? 'Blanc-du-bois' & 'Black Spanish'
Biggest mistake he sees beginners make?  Too little watering the first two years when plants need about a gallon a day.  Slowly reduce. By third year, water plants only once a week or less.  "Stressing the vine produces the sweetest grapes," he explains.
 
Another tip: plant roses nearby.  "Roses will show sickness before it gets to the grapes," he explains. "Gives you time to determine what's going on in your vineyard."


While Jim focuses on his grapevines, center, Kathy (right) harvests
and sells colorful peppers and Oriental favorites like Green Tiger zucchini.
 
Jim and Kathy live above the winery and have surrounded Jim's lone Ike survivor - a pear tree - with a virtual United Nations array of herbs and vegetables, including many of her own Vietnamese favorites. Regular customers drop by to browse through, and buy, their usual selections of sweet potatoes, squash, okra, tomatoes, figs, limes, lemons, apples and pears among other choices seldom found in grocery stores.

The Gulf Coast Mead Fest will be a great place to learn more about grape growing. Better sign up early for the Lucy-style Grape Stomp competition - entries fill up quickly!  (Gulf Coast Mead Fest & Grape Stomp).

Other great resources for local (important!!) grape growing advice:
  • Urban Harvest (urbanharvest.org)
  • County AgriLife Extension offices (counties.agrilife.org)
  • Master Gardener Demonstration Gardens (mastergardener.tamu.edu/county-programs/)
  • Gulf Coast Fruit Study Group (gcfsg.weebly.com
  • Google "Houston Wineries" (we have lots!)
P.S. I know, this has nothing to do with gardening, but in case you wonder, as I did, the difference between "mead," "beer" and "wine" . . .  
  • Mead comes from fermenting honey; wine from fermenting fruit
  • Sugars in beer come from grains; sugars in mead come from fruit
  • Mead & wine usually have higher alcohol content than beer
  • Mead (sometimes called honey wine) is one of the oldest forms of fermented drink, dating back to ancient times
Who else would tell you these things?

*  *  *

Left to right, St. Augustine grass, Barbara's "alien circle" and Bermudagrass


ALIEN CIRCLES IN THE LAWN?
That's what Barbara Pottlitzer thought she might have in her St. Augustine.  What should she do? My advice below probably won't propitiate lawn fanatics and lawncare folks, but I told her it looked like happy chinch bugs to me. Chinch bugs are always present in our lawns. They're part of the natural soil ecology around here.

YUM . . . A CAVIER CAROUSAL! Chinch bugs are particularly fond of heat-exhausted, drought-defeated St. Augustine at the point when it's starting to go dormant in the summer --  which, of course, is what St. A. is genetically programmed to do. It's not dead-dead. It's dormant, with still viable roots, waiting for the cooler, more moist days of fall before it returns. Our lawn has died so many times over the years in the heat of summer.  We did nothing. It always comes back.

Somehow we easily tolerate plants going dormant in winter, but we don't like it when the poor St. A. does what it's supposed to do in summer. We can stop this, of course, by watering heavily. Dead grass won't come back to life. But watering will help the rest of the lawn fill in the dead area with new runners.

It's taken me 100+/- years, but I have finally convinced Husband it makes more sense to let the St. A. and Bermuda have a happy lawn marriage. St. A is prettiest fall thru late spring & Bermuda really greens up in summer. Mow it all as you normally do and it looks fine. Don't these two grasses look pretty much alike in the pictures?

Also, there's a reason why grass in that particular spot was the most appetizing to chinch bugs.  Probably the soil is somewhat deficient there -- could be a million reason why.  Easy palliative: spread some high quality compost on the dead areas to compensate for whatever's missing in the soil. That's the beauty of compost.  (I told you lawn fanatics and lawn care companies wouldn't like this.)



*   *   *
IF YOU SUBMIT EVENT NOTICES TO PRINT MEDIA: Lately I've received an unusual number of corrections to previously-submitted notices for our calendar, below.

Not a problem, glad to make them.  However, I've been handling group event notice submissions to print media for over 50 years. Changes are usually unavoidable, but are always a time-consuming hassle for media --  locating, retyping/reformatting, and -- in FAR too many cases - trying to figuring out what exactly has changed.  Please send all media corrections this way . . .  
  • ORIGINALLY SUBMITTED: Repeat exactly what you originally sent it so it can be easily found.
  • WHAT HAS CHANGED:  Instead of "9am, Building A, 13333 Road"
  • PLEASE USE: "10am, Building B, 13333 Road"
That way, the media person won't have to retype/reformat the entire thing or spend time searching for what's changed. On behalf of all print media folks handling calendars of all types, I thank you.  P.S.  As long as I have you Publicity Chairmen's eyes, another favor?  Please always put the name of your organization in the subject box. THANKS!

*   *   * 
Brenda's column in the free, emailed LAZY GARDENER & FRIENDS HOUSTON GARDEN NEWSLETTER
is based on her 45+ years as the Houston Chronicle's Lazy Gardener. To sign up: CLICK HERE .
Favors? 1. If I don't respond to your email, send it again! 2. Always check the LG&F Newsletter*  Calendar
to make sure your submitted event is listed! If not, let me know!
 
 
 
JOHN'S CORNER 
 
 
 



Nut sedge can drive gardeners nuts!

Questions from readers:

On 8/3/2016 3:56 PM: a reader wrote:
 
I read the lazy gardener newsletter and read all the books you recommend. I have gardened organically successfully for 35 years until 3 years ago. I have never used insecticides or herbicides and only used your compost and micro life fertilizer. The past 3 years I have been overrun with nut sedge. I have tried molasses drenches with no success. I have dug the nuts days, weeks and months on end. Every time I go to the nursery and ask for help they recommend roundup, image or sedge hammer. I have refused to use these products based on toxicity.
 
Do you have any suggestions for me?
Thank you for any insight into this overwhelming problem.
 
ANSWER:

Nut sedge has been a major problem this year as the massive amount of rain created ideal conditions and spread the seeds everywhere. This includes my front lawn, which was under floodwater but had not had nut sedge in over 20 years. I have very healthy fertile soil, hence I have not needed to water my lawn in 3 years, and the nut sedge is now slowly disappearing.
There are a few cultural controls:

General:

1) Nut sedge grows geometrically from the roots. On week one you have one plant, by the second week there are five plants, the third week there are 25 plants, week 4 there are 125 plants, etc. Never let it go to seed or you will have hundreds of plants to deal with. Prevention is the key, never let it become established.

2) Do not water as nut sedge loves moist soil. The best way to start to eliminate nut sedge organically is to eliminate the conditions that are causing it to thrive - poorly drained soil.

3) Do not use water-soluble fertilizers as nut sedge loves nitrate.

4) Aerate the soil if needed, as nut sedge tends to grow better in soils with low oxygen.

5) Like all plants, especially the ones we classify as weeds, it has a role in nature and is trying to do something. If we change the conditions then it cannot compete as well.

6) In the book "The Organic Lawn Care Manual", Paul Tukey notes that nut sedge is a sign of low calcium levels; so have your soil tested and add lime, wood ash or greensand as recommended. Everyone agrees that this weed thrives in anaerobic (low oxygen) soils. Paul recommends using compost tea to introduce more life to the soil; Howard Garrett prefers liquid molasses. Feeding with bulk compost will help.

7) Animals like ducks, geese and guinea hens will unearth and eat the tubers for you.

8) Eat the nuts! The tubers of yellow nutsedge are so edible the plant is known as the "Earth Almond" and its grown professionally. One source says they taste like almonds; the USDA says "between fresh coconut and raisins".

(9) Solarization - In case of extreme sedge weed infestation, solarization is a powerful option that will kill everything growing within the given area. By wetting the sedge area and covering the space with black polythene plastic sheets during days of hot sunshine, the combination of heat and suffocation will complete destroy plant matter beneath the sheet. Most bulbs and sedge seeds will remain unaffected by this process and further sedge weed control will be needed.

10) The best control for nut sedge appears to be molasses, believe it or not. Drench problem spots with liquid horticultural molasses at to cup per gallon of water. Start with about a gallon of drench per 9 - 10 sq. ft. This simple technique fires up the microbes in the soil and the nut sedge simply fades away. It takes a while to work and requires at least 2 - 3 applications. As opposed to toxic chemicals, it makes the soil healthier with every application (Howard Garrett website). Note: Research has shown that nut sedge does not like sugars, especially complex sugars found in molasses.

Dry molasses consists of organic material, such as soy meal, that is sprayed with liquid molasses. It provides a carbon source, which triggers beneficial microorganisms to decompose organic matter in the soil (including nutgrass tubers) at an increased rate. For effective control the dry molasses used to control nutgrass should have a 42 percent sugar level. Dry molasses applied with a drop spreader at a rate of 20 pounds for a 1,000-square-foot area helps kill nutgrass. This treatment should be repeated 14 days later. Control individual plants by sprinkling a handful of the dry molasses on each one.

11) If you continue to remove the new plants before they have a chance to replenish the reserves you can eventually starve and kill them. In order to do this, remove nut sedge plants before they have 5 or 6 leaves. This means eradication of any visible plants a minimum of once a week. Up to that stage new side tubers have not yet had time to form. The USDA says almost 60% of the energy is stored in the nut is used in the first sprouting. Another 20% in the second sprouting, IF the nut sedge is not allowed to grow and recharge the nut via sunlight.

Lawns:

1) If the grass is cut high (at least 4 inches) then the grass St Augustine or Bermuda will tend to choke it out over time. On my mower I drilled holes in the frame about one inch higher that the highest factory setting and inserted a sheet metal screw for the "stop". This allows me to grow taller grass. In nature, St. Augustine will grow 15-18 inches tall. When we cut it short, the grass becomes stressed and cannot compete as well.

2) A couple times this year I waited till the St. Augustine was 8-10 inches tall before mowing so it would shade and choke the nut sedge.

3) If there is only a small amount, one can take an eyedropper with agriculture vinegar and let a few drops run down the nut sedge stem where it can reach the roots and nut.  This is tedious but does work.

Flowerbeds:

1) Smothering can be effective. Sheet of cardboard from scrap cardboard boxes laid down between plants and covered with 4 inches of mulch. Without light the nut sedge will die. Note: If the cardboard becomes wet, the nut sedge will punch right through the cardboard and mulch.

2) Shading - nut sedge needs lots of light. If they cannot get enough sunlight, they tend to die out, as they cannot compete. Let your landscape plants become very full and do not prune until the nut sedge has died off.

Chemical:

1) Never use Round-Up as it creates soil conditions that favor nut sedge

 
If any reader has other organic methods that has worked for them please let us know.




 







                                                                    *   *   *
 
WEEKLY GARDENING EVENTS &
ANNOUNCEMENTS 
CALENDAR

TO SUBMIT AN EVENT FOR THIS CALENDAR, PLEASE NOTE.
Events NOT submitted in the EXACT written format below may take two weeks or longer
to be reformatted/retyped. After that point, if your event does not appear, please email us.
Submit to: lazygardener@sbcglobal.net 
 
If we inspire you to attend any of these events, please let them know you heard about it in
THE LAZY GARDENER & FRIENDS HOUSTON GARDEN NEWSLETTER 
 


TUES., AUG. 16: CONTAINER GARDENING by HARRIS COUNTY MASTER GARDENERS. 6:30-8:30 pm, Spring Branch Memorial Library, 930 Corbindale. Free. hcmga.tamu.edu/Public/docs/2016-green-thumb.pdf; 281-855-5600         
.
TUES., AUG. 16:  GARDENING BY THE SQUARE FOOT, by JON JOHNS, 6:30-8:30 pm. AgriLife Extension Building, Carbide Park, 4102-B Main St. (Hwy 519), La Marque. Galveston County Master Gardener event. Free; register: galv3@wt.net. aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston

THURS., AUG. 18: CONTAINER GARDENING by HARRIS COUNTY MASTER GARDENERS. 6:30-8:30 pm. Freeman Branch Library, 16616 Diana Lane. Free. hcmga.tamu.edu/Public/docs/2016-green-thumb.pdf; 281-855-5600          

THURS., AUG. 18: REWINDING: SUSTAINABLE LANDSCAPING AT MD ANDERSON CANCER CENTER by DAVID RENNINGER, 7-8:30 pm, Houston Arboretum & Nature Center, 4501 Woodway. Free. Native Plant Society of Texas-Houston event. npsot.org

SAT, AUG. 20: CONTAINER GARDENING by HARRIS COUNTY MASTER GARDENERS. 10am-Noon. Maude Smith Marks Library, 1815 Westgreen Blvd., Katy. Free. hcmga.tamu.edu/Public/docs/2016-green-thumb.pdf281-855-5600

SAT., AUG. 20: GROWING GREAT TOMATOES by URBAN HARVEST, 10-11am, Buchanan's Native Plants, 611 E 11th. Free. 713-861-5702; buchanansplants.com/events

MON. AUG. 22: ORGANIC METHODS IN GARDENING - THE SOIL FOOD WEB, by JOHN FERGUSON, South Montgomery County Friends of The Library, 2pm, Mitchell Library, 8125 Ashland Way, The Woodlands. 281-681-0470
.       
TUES., AUG.  23: HARRIS COUNTY MASTER GARDENERS OPEN GARDEN DAY & SEMINAR: CONTAINER GARDENING 10-11 am, Weekley Community Center,8440 Greenhouse Road. Free. harrishort@gmail.com 

SAT., AUG 27: PECKERWOOD GARDEN OPEN DAY, 10am-2pm tours, 20559 FM 359 Road, Hempstead. $10. Garden Conservancy event. peckerwoodgarden.org; 979-826-3232; info@peckerwoodgarden.org

SAT., AUG. 27:  ARRANGING GARDEN FLOWERS, by JACKIE AUER, 9-11am, & GROWING STRAWBERRIES by ROBERT MARSHALL, 1-2pm, AgriLife Extension Building, Carbide Park, 4102-B Main St. (Hwy 519), La Marque.  Galveston County Master Gardener event. Free; register: galv3@wt.net. aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/ 
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WED., AUG 31:  CHILDREN'S PHOTO & PRESCHOOL PICTURE CONTESTS ENTRY DEADLINE. Matzke Butterfly Garden competition. Contest rules: matzkebutterflygarden.blogspot.com 

THURS., SEPT. 1: AROMATHERAPY & FRAGRANCE IN THE GARDEN by LUCIA BETTLER, 9:30am, Municipal Utility Building #81, 805 Hidden Canyon Drive, Katy.  Free.  Nottingham Country Garden Club event. nottinghamgardenclub.org 

SAT., SEP 3 : PECKERWOOD INSIDER'S TOUR, 10am & 6pm, 20559 FM 359 Road, Hempstead. Garden Conservancy event. $15. Register: peckerwoodgarden.org. 979-826-3232; info@peckerwoodgarden.org 

MON., SEPT/ 5: ANYONE CAN GROW ROSES, by JOHN JONS, 2- 3pm, The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Rienzi, 1406 Kirby Drive. $10. 713-639-7800, mfah.org/visit/rienzi/

THURS., SEPT. 8: GROWING PALMS by O. J. MILLER, 10am, Clear Lake Meeting Room, 5001 Nasa Parkway, Seabrook. Free. Harris County Pct. 2 event. hcmga.tamu.edu

THURS., SEPT. 8: ROSES OF THE DUTCH MASTERS by DR. JIM JOHNSON, 7:30pmCherie Flores Garden Pavilion, 1500 Hermann Dr. Free. Houston Rose Society event. houstonrose.org

FRI., SEPT. 10: THE EVIL HOUSE OF ROSES: WHY JOSEPHINE BONAPARTE IS ALIVE IN YOUR GARDEN by DR. MARTIN STONE, 10am, White Oak Convention Center, 7603 Antoine. Free. Houston Federation of Garden Clubs event. houstonfederationgardenclubs.org
.
SAT., SEP. 10:  KITCHEN GARDENING, by MARY DEMENY, 9-11:30am, & COMPOSTING by JIM GILLIAM, 1-2pm, AgriLife Extensio Building, Carbide Park, 4102-B Main St. (Hwy 519), La Marque.  Galveston County  Master Gardener event. Free Register: galvcountymgs@gmail.com. aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/
.
SAT., SEPT. 10: 2016 (18th ANNUAL) WILDSCAPES WORKSHOP, 8am-3:30pm, Houston Community College-West Loop Center, 5601 W. Loop S. $40 / $50 after Aug. 27. Native Plant Society of Texas-Houston event. npsot.org/wp/houston/wildscapes-workshop
 
SAT. SEPT. 10: KEYHOLE GARDENS MADE EASY by ANGELA CHANDLER, Garden Academy. 10-12pm, Arbor Gate,15635 FM 2920,Tomball, TX. 281-351-8851. Free; register@arborgate.com

TUESDAYS, SEPT. 13-NOV. 15: TEXAS GULF COAST GARDENER TIER II - OUTSTANDING LANDSCAPE PLANTS, 9am-3pm, Mercer Botanic Gardens, 22306 Aldine Westfield Rd, Humble. $225. Register: hcp4.net/Community/Parks/Mercer; jgarrison@hcp4.net
 
WED., SEPT. 14: BUILD A HABITAT & THEY WILL COME!, noon-2 pm, Mercer Botanic Gardens, 22306 Aldine Westfield Rd, Humble. Free. Register: 713-274-4160

WED. SEPT. 14: EASY EDIBLES by JUDY BARRETT, noon-1pm, Arbor Gate, 15635 FM 2920, Tomball. 281-351-8851. Free; register: arborgate.com
 
THURS. SEPT. 15: BEYOND BUTTERFLIES: PLANTING A POLLINATOR GARDEN by NANCY GREIG, Cockrell Butterfly Center, 10-12pm, Arbor Gate, 15635 FM 2920, Tomball. 281-351-8851. Free; register: arborgate.com

THURSDAYS, SEPT. 15-NOV. 17: TEXAS GULF COAST GARDENER TIER I - INTRO TO GARDENING, 9 am-3 pm, Mercer Botanic Gardens, 22306 Aldine Westfield Rd, Humble. $225. Register: hcp4.net/Community/Parks/Mercer; jgarrison@hcp4.net


FRI., SEPT. 16: FRI., SEPT. 16: GREATER HOUSTON PLANT CONFERENCE 2016, 8am-4pm, Trini Mendenhall Community Center, 1414 Wirt Rd. $60. Texas A&M AgriLife Extension. Details/registration

SAT., SEPT. 17:  A PASSION FOR PLUMERIA by LORETTA OSTEEN, 1-3pm, Galveston County AgriLife Extension Building, Carbide Park, 4102-B Main St. (Hwy 519), La Marque.  Free. Register: galvcountymgs@gmail.com.
aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/
. 
SAT., SEPT. 17: GARDENING IN SMALL SPACES by SKIP RICHTER, 10-noon, Arbor Gate,15635 FM 2910, Tomball. 281-351-8851. Free; register: arborgate.com
 
SUN. SEPT. 18: BEE FORUM by ANGELA CHANDLER, MATT AND KELLY BRANTLEY, 11-1pm, Arbor Gate, 15635 FM 2920, Tomball. 281-351-8851. Free; register: arborgate.com

MON., SEPT. 19: OPEN GARDEN DAY & PLANT SALE, 8:30-11am, Genoa Friendship Garden, 1202 Genoa Red Bluff Rd.  Free. Harris County Master Gardener Pct. 2 event. hcmga.tamu.edu

SAT., SEP 24: PECKERWOOD GARDEN OPEN DAY, 10am-2pm tours, 20559 FM 359 Road, Hempstead. $10. Garden Conservancy event. peckerwoodgarden.org; 979-826-3232; info@peckerwoodgarden.org 
SAT., SEPT. 24:  T-BUD GRAFTING HANDS-ON WORKSHOP by SUE JEFFCO, 9-11:30am, & UNUSUAL EDIBLE PLANTS by ED NASPINSKI, 1-2pm, AgriLife Extension Building, Carbide Park, 4102-B Main St. (Hwy 519), La Marque.  Galveston County Master Gardener event. Free. Register: galvcountymgs@gmail.com; http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/
.  
SAT., SEPT. 24:  LEAGUE CITY GARDEN WALK - "THROUGH THE GARDEN GATE", 10am-4pm. $15. leaguecitygardenclub.org.
 
SAT., SEPT. 24: AUTUMN PLANT SALE & MARKET, 9 am - 3 pm, Mercer Botanic Gardens, 22306 Aldine Westfield Rd, Humble. Free event. 713-274-4160

SAT. SEPT. 24: FALL GARDENING: THE BEST VEGGIE GARDEN OF ALL by BILL ADAMS & TOM LEROY, 10-noon, Arbor Gate, 15635 FM 2920, Tomball. 281-351-8851. Free; register: arborgate.com
 
WED. SEPT 28: WINTERY BREWS FROM THE GARDEN by CYNTHIA GRAHAM, RN, BSN, 12-1pm, Arbor Gate, 15635 FM 2920, Tomball. 281-351-8851. Free; register: arborgate.com

SAT., OCT 1 : PECKERWOOD INSIDER'S TOUR, 10am and 6pm, 20559 FM 359 Road, Hempstead. Garden Conservancy event. $15. Register: peckerwoodgarden.org, 979-826-3232; info@peckerwoodgarden.org 

SAT., OCTOBER 1: FALL FEST - BNP 30th ANNIVERSARY, 11am-4pm, Buchanan's Native Plants, 611 E 11th. Free. 713-861-5702; buchanansplants.com/events

TUE., OCT 4: EASY BUTTERFLY GARDENING by PHYLLIS KOENIG, 6:30-8 pm. AgriLife Extension, Carbide Park, 4102 Main, La Marque. Galveston County Master Gardener event. Free, but pre-register: galvcountymgs@gmail.com,281-534-3413, aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston 
 
THURS.OCT.6: GET YOUR GREENS ON - ASIAN STYLE!! by Jeremy Kollaus and Chef Chris Crowder, 10-12pm, Arbor Gate,15635 FM 2920 Tomball. 281-351-8851. Free; register: arborgate.com

SAT., OCT. 8: PECKERWOOD GARDEN OPEN DAY, 10am-2pm tours, 20559 FM 359 Road, Hempstead. $10. Garden Conservancy event. peckerwoodgarden.org 979-826-3232; info@peckerwoodgarden.org

SAT., OCT 8: BULBMANIA!, by DODIE JACKSON, 9-10 am, & GARDENING FOR JEWELS...HUMMINGBIRDS by DEBORAH REPASZ, 1-2:30 pm. AgriLife Extension, Carbide Park, 4102 Main, La Marque. Galveston County Master Gardener events. Free, but pre-register: galvcountymgs@gmail.com, 281-534-3413, aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston 
 
SAT. OCT.8: BULBS AND BUDDIES by Chris Wiesinger Southern Bulb Company and Heidi Sheesley of Treesearch Farms, 10-12pm, Arbor Gate, 15635 FM 2920, Tomball. 281-351-8851. Free; register: arborgate.com
 
SUN. OCT.9: INDOOR COMPOSTING-OUTDOOR SUCCESS by ANGELA CHANDLER of The Garden Academy, 11-1pm, Arbor Gate,15635 FM 2920,

TUES., OCT. 11: GROWING PLUMERIAS, 7:30pm, Cherie Flores Garden Pavilion, Hermann Park Conservancy, 1500 Hermann Dr. Free. Plumeria Society of America event. theplumeriasociety.org 

TUE., OCT 11: MY FAVORITE PERENNIALS by JAN BRICK, 6:30-8 pm. AgriLife Extension, Carbide Park, 4102 Main, La Marque. Galveston County Master Gardener event. Free. Register: galvcountymgs@gmail.com. 281-534-3413, aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston 
 
WED. OCT. 12: DIGGING OUT OF DEPRESSION by CYNTHIA GRAHAM, RN, BSN, 12-1pm, Arbor Gate, 15635 FM 2920, Tomball. 281-351-8851. Free; register: arborgate.com

THURS., OCT. 13: 2016 BULB & PLANT MART'S EARLY BIRD SHOPPING PARTY 4:30-7pm, St. John the Divine Church, 2450 River Oaks Blvd. $20. Garden Club of Houston. gchouston.org

FRI.-SAT., OCT. 14-15: 2016 BULB & PLANT MART, 9am-5pm Fri., 9am-2pm Sat., St. John the Divine, 2450 River Oaks Blvd. Free admission/ tax free shopping. Garden Club of Houston event.  gchouston.org 
.
THURS. OCT.13: ATTRACTING BLUEBIRDS TO YOUR GARDEN by LINDA CRUM, 10-noon, Arbor Gate 15635 FM 2910, Tomball. 281-351-8851. Free; register: arborgate.com
 
FRI., OCT. 14: EMPOWERING MONARCH HEROES COMMUNITY BY COMMUNITY by MARYA FOWLER, 10am, White Oak Convention Center, 7603 Antoine. Free. Houston Federation of Garden Clubs event. houstonfederationgardenclubs.org
 
SAT., OCT. 15:  GALVESTON COUNTY MASTER GARDENER ANNUAL FALL SALE. 8am-SALE PREVIEW by JOHN JONS; 9am-1pm-PLANT SALE, Galveston County Fair Grounds, Jack Brooks Park - Rodeo Arena, Hwy 6 at Jack Brooks Road, Hitchcock.
 
SAT., OCT.15: EDIBLE FLOWERS by HENRY FLOWERS of Festival Hill Gardens, 10am-12pm, Arbor Gate, 15635 FM 2920, Tomball. 281-351-8851. Free; register: arborgate.com
 
SUN., OCT.16: FLOWERING HERBS AND FESTIVE TREATS by ANN WHEELER and CHRIS CROWDER 11am-1pm, Arbor Gate, 15635 FM 2920, Tomball. 281-351-8851. Free; register: arborgate.com
 
THURS., OCT. 20: HAPPY HERBAL NEW YEAR by Ann Wheeler of Log House Herbs, 10am-noon, Arbor Gate, 15635 FM 2920, Tomball. 281-351-8851. Free; register: arborgate.com

FRI.-SUN., OCT. 21-23: AMERICAN ROSE SOCIETY SOUTH CENTRAL DISTRICT 2016 FALL ROSE SHOW & CONVENTION, Pasadena Convention Center, 7902 Fairmont Parkway. houstonrose.org.
 
SAT., OCT. 22: GUNTERS HEIRLOOM VEGETABLES by PAM AND LEAH GUNTER 9am-1pm, & THE FALL AND WINTER FRUIT GARDENER by ANGELA, 10am-noon, Arbor Gate, 15635 FM 2920, Tomball. 281-351-8851. Free; register: arborgate.com
 
WED OCT 26: FALL AND WINTER HABITAT GARDENING by DIANA FOSS, Houston Urban Biologist, noon-1pm, Arbor Gate, 15635 FM 2920, Tomball. 281-351-8851. Free; register: arborgate.com

SAT., OCT. 29: GULF COAST MEAD FESTIVAL, LUCY-STYLE GRAPE STOMP COMPETITION & GRAPE GROWING DISCUSSIONS, 10am-5pm, Frascone Winery, 308 Bayside Dr., Anahuac. Free. Frascone Winery, Mystic Oak Meadery, Bentley Bees & Crane Meadows event. Facebook: Gulf Coast Mead Festival.

SAT., OCT. 29: GARDEN TO VASE by PAT HERMES ,10am-noon, Arbor Gate, 15635 FM 2920, Tomball. 281-351-8851. Free; register: arborgate.com

SAT., NOV 5 : PECKERWOOD INSIDER'S TOUR, 10am & 6pm, 20559 FM 359 Road, Hempstead. Garden Conservancy event. $15. Register: peckerwoodgarden.org. 979-826-3232; info@peckerwoodgarden.org 
   
FRI., NOV. 11: FLOWER SHOW - JUDGING DEMYSTIFIED by SUZANNE MILSTEAD & NELL SHIMEK, 10am, & TRAFFIC FLOW, 1pm, White Oak Convention Center, 7603 Antoine. Free. Houston Federation of Garden Clubs event. houstonfederationgardenclubs.org

SAT., NOV 12: PECKERWOOD GARDEN OPEN DAY, 10am-2pm tours, 20559 FM 359 Road, Hempstead. $10. Garden Conservancy event. peckerwoodgarden.org 979-826-3232; info@peckerwoodgarden.org 
    
SAT., NOV 26: PECKERWOOD GARDEN OPEN DAY, 10am-2pm tours, 20559 FM 359 Road, Hempstead. $10. Garden Conservancy event. peckerwoodgarden.org, 979-826-3232; info@peckerwoodgarden.org 
    
SAT., DEC 3 : PECKERWOOD INSIDER'S TOUR, 10am and 6pm, 20559 FM 359 Road, Hempstead. Garden Conservancy event. $15. Register:peckerwoodgarden.org, 979-826-3232; info@peckerwoodgarden.org

SAT. DEC. 3: THE ARBOR GATE CHRISTMAS OPEN HOUSE, 2-6pm, 15635 FM 2920, Tomball. 281-351-8851. Free; register: arborgate.com

FRI., DEC. 9: HOLLY-JUJAH by JIM JOHNSON, 10am, White Oak Convention Center, 7603 Antoine. $10 advance sale only. Houston Federation of Garden Clubs event. houstonfederationgardenclubs.org
 
SAT., DEC 17: PECKERWOOD GARDEN OPEN DAY, 10am-2pm tours, 20559 FM 359 Road, Hempstead. $10. Garden Conservancy event. peckerwoodgarden.org, 979-826-3232; info@peckerwoodgarden.org

FRI., JAN. 13: PENNY WISE / POUND FOOLISH: WHEN & WHY TO HIRE A LANDSCAPE PROFESSIONAL by PENNY WISE & RITA HODGE, 10am, White Oak Convention Center, 7603 Antoine. Free. Houston Federation of Garden Clubs event. houstonfederationgardenclubs.org

FRI., FEB.10: FLORAL DESIGN INSPIRED BY ART by HOUSTON DESIGNING WOMEN, 10am, White Oak Convention Center, 7603 Antoine. Free. Houston Federation of Garden Clubs event. houstonfederationgardenclubs.org
 
 
  
If we inspire you to attend any of these events,
please let them know you heard about it in . . .

THE LAZY GARDENER & FRIENDS NEWSLETTER!
 
 
TO SUBMIT AN EVENT FOR THIS CALENDAR, PLEASE NOTE.
Events NOT submitted in the EXACT written format below may take two weeks or longer
to be reformatted/retyped. After that point, if your event does not appear, please email us.
Submit to: lazygardener@sbcglobal.net  
 
 
 
THIS NEWSLETTER IS MADE
POSSIBLE BY THE FOLLOWING SPONSORS











ADOPTABLE DOG OF THE WEEK

DIESEL

Diesel was abandoned by his owners when they moved, and he ended up at Montgomery County Animal Shelter. 

Diesel is a American Blue Pittbull Mix and is thought to be about 10 years old. 

He knows basic commands- is housebroken and crate trained- loves everyone he meets... Loves bones, treats and squeaky toys- even likes a nice jog. He has a good amount of life to live and would love to have somewhere to spend it. If he has siblings- they have to be female. 

Diesel loves to play and socialize and is so much fun to have around.

He is fixed and has all of his shots.

If interested in adopting Diesel, please reply to this newsletter and type "Diesel" in the subject line. Diesel is not at the shelter currently. He is in foster care.
                                             


                                                ABOUT US



 
BRENDA BEUST SMITH
 
WE KNOW HER BEST AS THE LAZY GARDENER . . . 

. . . but Brenda Beust Smith is also:

   * a national award-winning writer & editor
   * a nationally-published writer & photographer 
   * a national horticultural speaker
   * a former Houston Chronicle reporter
   
When the Chronicle discontinued Brenda's 45-year-old Lazy Gardener" print column a couple of years ago, it ranked as the longest-running, continuously-published local newspaper column in the Greater Houston area.

Brenda's gradual sideways step from Chronicle reporter into gardening writing led first to an 18-year series of when-to-do-what Lazy Gardener Calendars, then to her Lazy Gardener's Guide book and now to her Lazy Gardener's Guide on CD (which retails for $20. However, $5 of every sale is returned to the sponsoring group at her speaking engagements).

A Harris County Master Gardener, Brenda has served on the boards of many Greater Houston area horticulture organizations and has hosted local radio and TV shows, most notably a 10+-year Lazy Gardener run on HoustonPBS (Ch. 8) and her call-in "EcoGardening" show on KPFT-FM. 

Brenda recently ended her decades-long stint as Production Manager of the Garden Club of America's BULLETIN magazine. Although still an active horticulture lecturer and broad-based freelance writer,  Brenda's main focus now is  THE LAZY GARDENER & FRIENDS HOUSTON GARDEN NEWSLETTER with John Ferguson and Mark Bowen of Nature's Way Resources.

A native of New Orleans and graduate of St. Agnes Academy and the University of Houston, Brenda lives in Aldine and is married to the now retired Aldine High School Coach Bill Smith. They have one son, Blake.

Regarding this newsletter, Brenda is the lead writer, originator of it and the daily inspiration for it. We so appreciate the way she has made gardening such a fun way to celebrate life together for such a long time.
 
 
JOHN FERGUSON
 
John is a native Houstonian and has over 27 years of business experience. He owns Nature's Way Resources, a composting company that specializes in high quality compost, mulch, and soil mixes. He holds a MS degree in Physics and Geology and is a licensed Soil Scientist in Texas. 
 
John has won many awards in horticulture and environmental issues. He represents the composting industry on the Houston-Galveston Area Council for solid waste. His personal garden has been featured in several horticultural books and "Better Homes and Gardens" magazine. His business has been recognized in the Wall Street Journal for the quality and value of their products. He is a member of the Physics Honor Society and many other professional societies.  John is is the co-author of the book Organic Management for the Professional. 
 
For this newsletter, John contributes articles regularly and is responsible for publishing it.


MARK BOWEN
 
Mark is a native Houstonian, a horticulturist, certified permaculturist and organic specialist with a background in garden design, land restoration and organic project management. He is currently the general manager of Nature's Way Resources. Mark is also the co-author of the book Habitat Gardening for Houston and Southeast Texas, the author of the book Naturalistic Landscaping for the Gulf Coast, co-author of the Bayou Planting Guide and contributing landscape designer for the book Landscaping Homes: Texas. 
 
With respect to this newsletter, Mark serves as a co-editor and periodic article contributor.



PABLO HERNANDEZ
 
Pablo Hernandez is the special projects coordinator for Nature's Way Resources. His realm of responsibilities include: serving as a webmaster, IT support, technical problem solving/troubleshooting, metrics management, quality control, and he is a certified compost facility operator.
 
Pablo helps this newsletter happen from a technical support standpoint. 


 

 
 
COUPON: Nature's Way Resources. 50% off pomegranates, apples, asian pears and selected antique roses. 
 (Offer good for retail purchases of this product (101 Sherbrook Circle, Conroe TX). Expires 08/22/16.
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