July 23rd, 2016

Dear Friends,

Here is the 166th issue of our weekly gardening newsletter for Houston, the Gulf Coast and beyond. We really appreciate all of our readers hanging in there with us, sharing stories and inspiring us in so many ways. 
 
Thanks so much!
 
This newsletter is a project of The Lazy Gardener, Brenda Beust Smith, John Ferguson and Mark Bowen (John and Mark are with Nature's Way Resources). We also have a great supporting cast of contributing writers and technical specialists who will chime in and tweak away regularly. We would love to keep receiving your input on this newsletter . . . . comments . . . . suggestions . . . . questions. . . .Email your thoughts to: lazygardenerandfriends@gmail.com. Thanks so much for your interest.
 
Please  or sign yourself up to receive this newsletter by clicking the "Join Our Mailing List" link just below. We will never sell or share our mailing list to protect the privacy of our subscribers.

Enjoy!

 




BE PATIENT . . . FALL IS PERHAPS OUR BEST BLOOMING
SEASON  . . . SO PROTECT THOSE ROSES NOW!

By BRENDA BEUST SMITH 
 
The other day a newcomer to our area said to me: "Boy, I can't wait for September when Fall arrives."
 
All I could do was sigh, and try to explain that, in this area, "fall" doesn't really arrive until mid-October. August and September are traditionally just as hot, or even hotter, than it is now.
 
That's why, if you're into using plant hardiness zone maps, for heaven's sake use one for HEAT tolerance. The American Horticultural Society has one, but I don't think it's very useful for us.  Most maps focus on cold tolerance, a big problem for the rest of the country.  Hence the importance of using LOCAL advice in plant selection.
 
The good news: fall is normally a better growing/blooming/gardening period for us than is spring. Days gradually get cooler, rain more reasonable (fewer monsoons as in spring) and bugs less active. I kid you not!
 
Best of all, in late Sept.-Oct-Nov-Dec, (sometimes even January!) we see our most beautiful blooms on many wildflowers, fall- and long-blooming shrubs, many bulbs and, most of all, on roses.
 
 
Super splashy fall bloomers - (l to r above) gloriosa daisy, firespike, lobelia, petunias.  
And below: African daisies, alyssum, calendula, drummond phlox



Some of our best plant sales are in fall -- ideal time to plant almost all ornamental shrubs, wildflowers, bulbs and fall/winter vegetables. In spring, the soil heats up so quickly, many poor plants never have a chance to set strong roots. The true heat of summer hits, they die (or look peaked) and you wonder why.  Topgrowth reflects root growth.   
 
Among the big Fall Plant Sales already listed in our calendar below (see calendar for details):  
  • MON., AUG. 1 & MON., AUG 15: OPEN GARDEN DAY & PLANT SALE, Harris County Master Gardener. hcmga.tamu.edu
  • SAT.-SUN., OCT. 1-2: SPRING BRANCH AFRICAN VIOLET CLUB ANNUAL ALL SALE. kjwross@yahoo.com
  • FRI.-SAT., OCT. 14-15: 2016 BULB & PLANT MART.  gchouston.org  (Early Bird Shopping Oct. 13)
  • FRI.-SUN., OCT. 21-23: AMERICAN ROSE SOCIETY SOUTH CENTRAL DISTRICT 2016 FALL ROSE SHOW & CONVENTION, houstonrose.org.

 

Altho this next one, a Mead Festival, may be about grapes, but it isn't a fall plant sale. It's just too much fun not to give a little extra publicity to a Lucy-Style Grape Stomp for teams of two -- one to stomp and one with a bottle-brush to keep the drain hole open. How often does one get to do that around here? Sign up to make sure you're entered!   

More in a later column on James, his wonderful gardens and the great Neil Diamond story behind his beloved Oak Island. Stay tuned for "the rest of the story" - as Paul Harvey used to say.    
 
Fall is an incredible blooming period for all roses here. Most well-adapted antique roses will easily survive without extra summer care.  But even the hardiest one will appreciate a little TLC during August, perhaps our worst summer month of all. And grafted roses definitely need to be closely watched.

In our Spotlight article below, Rosarian extraordinaire Baxter Williams shares summer survival tips from his "It Is As Hot As H____" article in  The Rosette, newsletter of the Houston Rose Society, the nation's largest rose society.
 
A must-have resource if you are growing roses in this area, The Rosette also keeps you up-to-date on our numerous rose events, such as the big Oct. 21-23 American Rose Society South Central 2016 Fall Rose Show & Convention.  
 
Only catch re the article below, you have to be a HRS member to read the full version.  Details: houstonrose.orgCheck out HRS's Facebook Page (with this gorgeous cover photo (among many others):
 
 
 

Excerpted from The Rosette 
 
"It Is As Hot As H____"
 
By BAXTER WILLIAMS 
ARS Master Rosarian
For complete version, join the Houston Rose Society  houstonrose.org
 
The roses seem to handle the heat much better than I do; at least they don't show sweat and need to have their clothes washed every evening.
 
Since there is so much insolation (sunshine) the roses can grow to their potential size . . . as long as they are fed and sufficiently hydrated (watered) . . .  and their leaves are kept intact. Note: All successful rose growing is a function of healthy leaflets - no leaflets, no good growth.
 
There are some little tricks that you can employ to make things grow better.
 
1.   Water regularly. A full-grown Hybrid Tea bush will aspirate about 5 gallons of water a week. That translates to 1-inch of water in each 3' x 3' space in the rose bed. Bury an open cat-food can even with the top of the mulch, and if it is full at the end of your watering cycle, you have done it right.
 
2. Cut spent blooms away. Make the cuts at the cane diameter that you wish the next growth to be. To support a large bloom, you will need a -inch stem. Otherwise, cut it off. Make the cut 1/8-inch above the second or third 5-leaflet leaf below the old bloom --- longer than 1/8-inch will likely cause dieback. Remove the first two leaflets, leaving the next two and the one at the end of the leaf (to) help it to form a new growth.
 
3. Watch for three stems. If three new stems come from the same cut, snap the outer two away using your fingernail (to) make it larger. If all three are left, the center one will almost always be smaller and weaker than the outer ones.
 
4. Remove blind shoots. Little clusters of leaflets (sometimes 5 or 6 on almost no stem at all) will never bear a flower, often contract blackspot, harbor insect pests and shade more-productive leafs so that less good growth occurs.
 
5. Remove suckers.  Growths from the shank below the bud union are from the rootstock, not the variety that will give the blooms for which you hope. They will draw energy from bloom stems. Break them off. Damage at that location helps stop new suckers.
 
6. Don't forget to feed

7. Add mulch.  First broadcast some alfalfa pellets around the rose plants to give the earthworms a treat - they love that stuff!
 
8. Remove dead canes. Especially at the bud union. Don't leave stubs. Apply White Glue (Elmer's?) to seal the cut surface to prevent deterioration. Canes up in the plant do not need to be sealed.
 
9. Remove seed pods.  Seed pods will slow down the formation of new blooms, and new growth will attempt to come from that location on the plant, which might not be where you would wish it to form.
 
10. Remove older canes, favoring new ones. New canes have the smooth, green bark. Old canes usually have grey or streaked bark, and seldom produce new growths of best size.
 
11. KEEP LEAVES ON THE BUSH! When the leaf falls off, the bush must derive replacement leaf growth from its internal energy. But that energy should have been used to produce new blooms, so the bloom cycle is compromised. For healthy and productive bushes, get rid of blackspot. A blackspotted leaflet is a doomed leaflet.
 
* * *

Baxter will be one of the many internationally-recognized Rosarians on hand at the: 
FRI.-SUN., OCT. 21-23: AMERICAN ROSE SOCIETY SOUTH CENTRAL DISTRICT 2016 FALL ROSE SHOW & CONVENTION, Pasadena Convention Center, 7902 Fairmont Parkway. houstonrose.org.
 
Brenda's column in the free, emailed LAZY GARDENER & FRIENDS HOUSTON GARDEN NEWSLETTER
is based on her 45+ years as the Houston Chronicle's Lazy Gardener.  Two favors?  1. If I don't respond
to an email, assume I didn't receive it and send it again! 2. Always check the calendar for submitted event notices.
If you don't see them, let me know immediately at lazygardener@sbcglobal.net

 
 
 
 
JOHN'S CORNER 
 


News from the wonderful world of soil and plants
 
 
 

One of the common spices many of us love is cinnamon. It is obtained from the inner bark of several trees in the genus Cinnamomum. Many studies have shown this spice can be used to help control diabetes, kill viruses and infections, and help with cramps. When we consume cinnamon on a regular basis, it has been found to help prevent cold and flu viruses. It helps improve motor function, increase the health of our neurons, and boost our memory. It has also been found that it can increase our good cholesterol and lower bad cholesterol. Many have found that it can help clear mucus and improve our circulation. Animal studies have shown that it can help protect the body from carcinogens.

Another study from Rush University Medical Center found that feeding cinnamon to mice with poor learning ability made the mice better learners. The cinnamon reversed biochemical, cellular and anatomical changes that led to poor learning. Science Daily July 7, 2016 summarizing a study in Journal of Neuroimmune Pharmacology 2016. 

A study from the Journal of the European Society of Endocrinology (2016) has found that happy cows produce higher quality of milk. They found that serotonin a chemical associated with the feelings of happiness, plays a role in maintaining calcium levels. Pasture raised cattle are happier than those confined to a feedlot leading to higher quality milk and beef.

As part of our sustainability effort, more people are using grey water for irrigation, which is often high in salt (NaCl). Researchers have found that some species of plants are very sensitive to the salt in the grey water. Sweetspire exhibited symptoms of stress when grey water was used to water them. Other species like Anise and muhly grass were very tolerant of the salts in grey water. HortTechnology June 2016.

Many reports are showing up on the news about toxic algae showing up on Florida's beaches. It has been found that this was caused by the application of Biosolids (sewage sludge) applied to areas near the contamination sites. Even though they pass federal regulations Biosolids often contain dangerous bacteria and other pathogens and regularly test for heavy metals, flame retardants, pharmaceuticals, phthalates, dioxins and other dangerous components. This is important for gardeners since many compost companies regularly use Biosolids in their compost (including several in Texas). It does increase nutrient content and is cheap, but the low cost comes at a price to our health and environment.

In the July 7th issue of PLOS Pathogens, researchers have found that a species of fungus (Metarhizium brunneum) will kill the larva of the Aedes mosquito that transmit the diseases of zika, dengue and chikungunya diseases. After exposure to this fungus, the larva dies within 12-24 hours.

All gardeners love butterflies. A study from the University of Connecticut has found that several species of butterflies such as Northern Hairstreaks will feed on non-nectar sources such as oak galls and honeydew from aphids and other insects.

In the Journal Plant Biology, researchers have found that when plants were injured and are threatened by insects it disrupts the electrical signals that plant cells use to communicate.

An article in American Nurseryman has reported that the emerald ash borer has now reached Texas. Several biocontrol agents (tiny parasitic wasps) have proven to be extremely effective in controlling this pest. They observed a 90% decline in live larva in infected trees when the wasps were used as a biocontrol agent.

Many garden centers still sell an invasive plant called heavenly bamboo (Nadina domestica). This plant is poisonous as it contains cyanide. There are reports of cedar waxwings dying from eating the berries. Horticulture, July/August 2016.

New information (research) on the importance on microbes for soil, plants, animals, and people seem to be released almost daily. In the journals Genome Medicine (2016) and Arthritis & Rheumatology (2016) two separate studies found that bacteria in our guts can predict rheumatoid arthritis. They identified species of bacteria that are rare or absent in healthy people but are in high levels in those with arthritis. In animal studies, they found that treating with certain good bacteria decreased symptom frequency and severity. There were also less inflammatory conditions associated with arthritis.

Researchers at Duke University have been studying the microbiome as plants are home to millions of microbes. There can be thousands of different species of bacteria within a single leaf. They also found 4,000 species of bacteria living inside of plants. Plant roots had 2-10 times more bacteria than leaves. Science Daily July 7, 2016.

Several studies have found that wood pulp (think sawdust) was added to Parmesan cheese in multiple brands sold by Wal-Mart, Whole Foods, and Kraft amongst others. Several lawsuits by the FDA are pending for false advertizing.
 
 
 
 
 





                                                                    *   *   *
 
WEEKLY GARDENING EVENTS &
ANNOUNCEMENTS 
CALENDAR

TO SUBMIT AN EVENT FOR THIS CALENDAR, PLEASE NOTE.
Events NOT submitted in the EXACT written format below may take two weeks or longer
to be reformatted/retyped. After that point, if your event does not appear, please email us.
Submit to: lazygardener@sbcglobal.net 
 
If we inspire you to attend any of these events, please let them know you heard about it in
THE LAZY GARDENER & FRIENDS HOUSTON GARDEN NEWSLETTER 
 
 
 

MON., AUG. 1: OPEN GARDEN DAY & PLANT SALE, 8:30-11am, Genoa Friendship Garden, 1202 Genoa Red Bluff Rd.  Free. Harris County Master Gardener event.  hcmga.tamu.edu

SAT., AUG. 6: PECKERWOOD INSIDER'S Tour, 10am, 20559 FM 359 Road, Hempstead. Garden Conservancy event. $10. Register: peckerwoodgarden.org,  979-826-3232; info@peckerwoodgarden.org 
    
THURS, AUG. 11: CONTAINER GARDENING BY HARRIS COUNTY MASTER GARDENERS. 6:30-8:30 pm. Barbara Bush Library, 6817 Cypresswood Dr., Spring. Free. hcmga.tamu.edu/Public/docs/2016-green-thumb.pdf; 281-855-5600

THURS., AUG. 11: ROSES OF RUSSIA, 7:30pm, Cherie Flores Garden Pavilion, 1500 Hermann Dr. Free. Houston Rose Society event. houstonrose.org
 
THURS., AUG. 11: FALL VEGETABLE GARDENING IN OUR AREA by CHRIS HAMMEN, 10am, Clear Lake Meeting Room, 5001 Nasa Parkway, Seabrook. Free.  Harris County Master Gardeners at Precinct 2 event. hcmga.tamu.edu

SAT.,
AUG. 13: STARTING A COMMUNITY OR SCHOOL GARDEN WORKSHOP, 8:30am-2:30pm, University of St. Thomas, Malloy Hall, Rm 017, 2812 Yoakum Blvd. Urban Harvest event. $20. 713-880-5540;  urbanharvest.org
.         
SAT.-SUN., AUG. 13-14: FALL HOME & GARDEN SHOW, Waterway Marriott Hotel & Convention Center, 1601 Lake Robbins Dr., The Woodlands, WoodlandsShows.com

MON., AUG. 15: OPEN GARDEN DAY & PLANT SALE, 8:30-11am, Genoa Friendship Garden, 1202 Genoa Red Bluff Rd.  Free. Harris County Master Gardener event.  hcmga.tamu.edu

TUES., AUG. 16: CONTAINER GARDENING by HARRIS COUNTY MASTER GARDENERS. 6:30-8:30 pm, Spring Branch Memorial Library, 930 Corbindale. Free.
hcmga.tamu.edu/Public/docs/2016-green-thumb.pdf; 281-855-5600         
.
TUE.S, AUG. 16:  GARDENING BY THE SQUARE FOOT, by JON JOHNS, 6:30-8:30 pm.  Galveston County AgriLife Extensio Building, Carbide Park, 4102-B Main St. (Hwy 519), La Marque. Master Gardener event. Free, but register at  galv3@wt.net; http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/      

THURS., AUG. 18: CONTAINER GARDENING by HARRIS COUNTY MASTER GARDENERS. 6:30-8:30 pm. Freeman Branch Library, 16616 Diana Lane. Free. hcmga.tamu.edu/Public/docs/2016-green-thumb.pdf; 281-855-5600          

SAT, AUG. 20: CONTAINER GARDENING by HARRIS COUNTY MASTER GARDENERS. 10am-Noon. Maude Smith Marks Library, 1815 Westgreen Blvd., Katy. Free. hcmga.tamu.edu/Public/docs/2016-green-thumb.pdf281-855-5600

MON. AUG. 22: ORGANIC METHODS IN GARDENING- THE SOIL FOOD WEB, by JOHN FERGUSON, South Montgomery County Friends of The Library (SMCFOL), 2pm, Mitchell Library, 8125 Ashland Way, The Woodlands. 281-681-0470
 
TUES., AUG.  23: HARRIS COUNTY MASTER GARDENERS OPEN GARDEN DAY & SEMINAR: CONTAINER GARDENING 10-11 am, Weekley Community Center,8440 Greenhouse Road. Free. harrishort@gmail.com

SAT., AUG 27: PECKERWOOD GARDEN OPEN DAY, 10am-2pm tours, 20559 FM 359 Road, Hempstead. $10. Garden Conservancy event. peckerwoodgarden.org 979-826-3232; info@peckerwoodgarden.org

SAT., AUG. 27:  ARRANGING GARDEN FLOWERS, by JACKIE AUER, 9-11am, & GROWING STRAWBERRIES by ROBERT MARSHALL, 1-2pm, Galveston County AgriLife Extension Building, Carbide Park, 4102-B Main St. (Hwy 519), La Marque.  Galveston County Master Gardener event. Free, but register at  galv3@wt.net; http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/         
.
WED., AUG
31:  CHILDREN'S PHOTO & PRESCHOOL PICTURE CONTESTS ENTRY DEADLINE. Matzke Butterfly Garden competition. Contest rules: matzkebutterflygarden.blogspot.com 

THURS., SEPT. 1: AROMATHERAPY & FRAGRANCE IN THE GARDEN by LUCIA BETTLER, 9:30am, Municipal Utility Building #81, 805 Hidden Canyon Drive, Katy.  Free.  Nottingham Country Garden Club event. nottinghamgardenclub.org .

SAT., SEP 3 : PECKERWOOD INSIDER'S TOUR, 10am and 6pm, 20559 FM 359 Road, Hempstead. Garden Conservancy event. $15. Register:peckerwoodgarden.org, 979-826-3232; info@peckerwoodgarden.org         

MON., SEPT/ 5: ANYONE CAN GROW ROSES, by JOHN JONS, 2- 3pm, The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Rienzi, 1406 Kirby Drive. $10. 713-639-7800, mfah.org/visit/rienzi/

FRI., SEPT. 10: THE EVIL HOUSE OF ROSES: WHY JOSEPHINE BONAPARTE IS ALIVE IN YOUR GARDEN by DR. MARTIN STONE, 10am, White Oak Convention Center, 7603 Antoine. Free. Houston Federation of Garden Clubs event. houstonfederationgardenclubs.org
 
SAT., SEP. 10:  KITCHEN GARDENING, by MARY DEMENY, 9-11:30am.  Galveston County AgriLife Extensio Building, Carbide Park, 4102-B Main St. (Hwy 519), La Marque.  Master Gardener event. Free Register: galvcountymgs@gmail.com; http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/
 
SAT., SEP. 10:  COMPOSTING, by JIM GILLIAN, 1-2pm; Galveston County AgriLife Extension Building, Carbide Park, 4102-B Main St. (Hwy 519), La Marque.  Master Gardener event. Free. Register: galvcountymgs@gmail.com; http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/

SAT., SEP 24: PECKERWOOD GARDEN OPEN DAY, 10am-2pm tours, 20559 FM 359 Road, Hempstead. $10. Garden Conservancy event. peckerwoodgarden.org 979-826-3232; info@peckerwoodgarden.org        
.
SAT., SEPT. 24:  T-BUD GRAFTING HANDS-ON WORKSHOP by SUE JEFFCO, 9-11:30am, Galveston County AgriLife Extension Building, Carbide Park, 4102-B Main St. (Hwy 519), La Marque.  Master Gardener event. Free. Register: galvcountymgs@gmail.com; http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/
 
SAT., SEPT. 24:  UNUSUAL EDIBLE PLANTS by ED NASPINSKI, 1-2pm; Galveston County AgriLife Extensio Building, Carbide Park, 4102-B Main St. (Hwy 519), La Marque.  Master Gardener event. Free, Register: galvcountymgs@gmail.com; http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/

SAT., OCT 1 : PECKERWOOD INSIDER'S TOUR, 10am and 6pm, 20559 FM 359 Road, Hempstead. Garden Conservancy event. $15. Register: peckerwoodgarden.org, 979-826-3232; info@peckerwoodgarden.org 

SAT.-SUN., OCT. 1-2: SPRING BRANCH AFRICAN VIOLET CLUB ANNUAL ALL SALE, 10am-4pm Sat., 10am-3pm Sun., Judson Robinson Jr. Community Center, 2020 Hermann Dr. 281-748-8417, kjwross@yahoo.com
     
SAT., OCT. 8: PECKERWOOD GARDEN OPEN DAY, 10am-2pm tours, 20559 FM 359 Road, Hempstead. $10. Garden Conservancy event. peckerwoodgarden.org 979-826-3232; info@peckerwoodgarden.org

TUES., OCT. 11: GROWING PLUMERIAS, 7:30pm, Cherie Flores Garden Pavillion, Hermann Park Conservancy, 1500 Hermann Dr. Free. Plumeria Society of America event. theplumeriasociety.org 

THURS., OCT. 13: 2016 BULB & PLANT MART'S EARLY BIRD SHOPPING PARTY 4:30-7pm, St. John the Divine Church, 2450 River Oaks Blvd. $20. Garden Club of Houston. gchouston.org

FRI.-SAT., OCT. 14-15: 2016 BULB & PLANT MART, 9am-5pm Fri., 9am-2pm Sat., St. John the Divine, 2450 River Oaks Blvd. Free admission/ tax free shopping. Garden Club of Houston event.  gchouston.org 
.
 FRI., OCT. 14: EMPOWERING MONARCH HEROES COMMUNITY BY COMMUNITY by MARYA FOWLER, 10am, White Oak Convention Center, 7603 Antoine. Free. Houston Federation of Garden Clubs event. houstonfederationgardenclubs.org
 
SAT., OCT. 15:  GALVESTON COUNTY MASTER GARDENER ANNUAL FALL SALE. 8am-SALE PREVIEW by JOHN JONS; 9am-1pm-PLANT SALE, Galveston County FairGrounds, Jack Brooks Park - Rodeo Arena, Hwy 6 at Jack Brooks Road, Hitchcock.
 
FRI.-SUN., OCT. 21-23: AMERICAN ROSE SOCIETY SOUTH CENTRAL DISTRICT 2016 FALL ROSE SHOW & CONVENTION, Pasadena Convention Center, 7902 Fairmont Parkway. houstonrose.org.

SAT., OCT 24: PECKERWOOD GARDEN OPEN DAY, 10am-2pm tours, 20559 FM 359 Road, Hempstead. $10. Garden Conservancy event. peckerwoodgarden.org, 979-826-3232; info@peckerwoodgarden.org 
    
SAT., OCT. 29: GULF COAST MEAD FESTIVAL, LUCY-STYLE GRAPE STOMP COMPETITION & GRAPE GROWING DISCUSSIONS, 10am-5pm, Frascone Winery, 308 Bayside Dr., Anahuac. Free. Frascone Winery, Mystic Oak Meadery, Bentley Bees & Crane Meadows event. Facebook: Gulf Coast Mead Festival.

SAT., NOV 5 : PECKERWOOD INSIDER'S TOUR, 10am and 6pm, 20559 FM 359 Road, Hempstead. Garden Conservancy event. $15. Register:peckerwoodgarden.org, 979-826-3232; info@peckerwoodgarden.org 
   
FRI., NOV. 11: FLOWER SHOW - JUDGING DEMYSTIFIED by SUZANNE MILSTEAD & NELL SHIMEK, 10am, & TRAFFIC FLOW, 1pm, White Oak Convention Center, 7603 Antoine. Free. Houston Federation of Garden Clubs event. houstonfederationgardenclubs.org

SAT., NOV 12: PECKERWOOD GARDEN OPEN DAY, 10am-2pm tours, 20559 FM 359 Road, Hempstead. $10. Garden Conservancy event. peckerwoodgarden.org 979-826-3232; info@peckerwoodgarden.org 
    
SAT., NOV 26: PECKERWOOD GARDEN OPEN DAY, 10am-2pm tours, 20559 FM 359 Road, Hempstead. $10. Garden Conservancy event. peckerwoodgarden.org, 979-826-3232; info@peckerwoodgarden.org 
    
SAT., DEC 3 : PECKERWOOD INSIDER'S TOUR, 10am and 6pm, 20559 FM 359 Road, Hempstead. Garden Conservancy event. $15. Register:peckerwoodgarden.org, 979-826-3232; info@peckerwoodgarden.org

FRI., DEC. 9: HOLLY-JUJAH by JIM JOHNSON, 10am, White Oak Convention Center, 7603 Antoine. $10 advance sale only. Houston Federation of Garden Clubs event. houstonfederationgardenclubs.org
 
SAT., DEC 17: PECKERWOOD GARDEN OPEN DAY, 10am-2pm tours, 20559 FM 359 Road, Hempstead. $10. Garden Conservancy event. peckerwoodgarden.org, 979-826-3232; info@peckerwoodgarden.org

FRI., JAN. 13: PENNY WISE / POUND FOOLISH: WHEN & WHY TO HIRE A LANDSCAPE PROFESSIONAL by PENNY WISE/POUND FOOLISH by RITA HODGE, 10am, White Oak Convention Center, 7603 Antoine. Free. Houston Federation of Garden Clubs event. houstonfederationgardenclubs.org

FRI., FEB.10: FLORAL DESIGN INSPIRED BY ART by Art by HOUSTON DESIGNING WOMEN, 10am, White Oak Convention Center, 7603 Antoine. Free. Houston Federation of Garden Clubs event. houstonfederationgardenclubs.org
 
 
  
If we inspire you to attend any of these events,
please let them know you heard about it in . . .

THE LAZY GARDENER & FRIENDS NEWSLETTER!
 
 
TO SUBMIT AN EVENT FOR THIS CALENDAR, PLEASE NOTE.
Events NOT submitted in the EXACT written format below may take two weeks or longer
to be reformatted/retyped. After that point, if your event does not appear, please email us.
Submit to: lazygardener@sbcglobal.net  
 
 
 
THIS NEWSLETTER IS MADE
POSSIBLE BY THE FOLLOWING SPONSORS











ADOPTABLE DOG OF THE WEEK

DIESEL

Diesel was abandoned by his owners when they moved, and he ended up at Montgomery County Animal Shelter. 

Diesel is a American Blue Pittbull Mix and is thought to be about 10 years old. 

He knows basic commands- is housebroken and crate trained- loves everyone he meets... Loves bones, treats and squeaky toys- even likes a nice jog. He has a good amount of life to live and would love to have somewhere to spend it. If he has siblings- they have to be female. 

Diesel loves to play and socialize and is so much fun to have around.

He is fixed and has all of his shots.

If interested in adopting Diesel, please reply to this newsletter and type "Diesel" in the subject line. Diesel is not at the shelter currently. He is in foster care.
                                             


                                                ABOUT US



 
BRENDA BEUST SMITH
 
WE KNOW HER BEST AS THE LAZY GARDENER . . . 

. . . but Brenda Beust Smith is also:

   * a national award-winning writer & editor
   * a nationally-published writer & photographer 
   * a national horticultural speaker
   * a former Houston Chronicle reporter
   
When the Chronicle discontinued Brenda's 45-year-old Lazy Gardener" print column a couple of years ago, it ranked as the longest-running, continuously-published local newspaper column in the Greater Houston area.

Brenda's gradual sideways step from Chronicle reporter into gardening writing led first to an 18-year series of when-to-do-what Lazy Gardener Calendars, then to her Lazy Gardener's Guide book and now to her Lazy Gardener's Guide on CD (which retails for $20. However, $5 of every sale is returned to the sponsoring group at her speaking engagements).

A Harris County Master Gardener, Brenda has served on the boards of many Greater Houston area horticulture organizations and has hosted local radio and TV shows, most notably a 10+-year Lazy Gardener run on HoustonPBS (Ch. 8) and her call-in "EcoGardening" show on KPFT-FM. 

Brenda recently ended her decades-long stint as Production Manager of the Garden Club of America's BULLETIN magazine. Although still an active horticulture lecturer and broad-based freelance writer,  Brenda's main focus now is  THE LAZY GARDENER & FRIENDS HOUSTON GARDEN NEWSLETTER with John Ferguson and Mark Bowen of Nature's Way Resources.

A native of New Orleans and graduate of St. Agnes Academy and the University of Houston, Brenda lives in Aldine and is married to the now retired Aldine High School Coach Bill Smith. They have one son, Blake.

Regarding this newsletter, Brenda is the lead writer, originator of it and the daily inspiration for it. We so appreciate the way she has made gardening such a fun way to celebrate life together for such a long time.
 
 
JOHN FERGUSON
 
John is a native Houstonian and has over 27 years of business experience. He owns Nature's Way Resources, a composting company that specializes in high quality compost, mulch, and soil mixes. He holds a MS degree in Physics and Geology and is a licensed Soil Scientist in Texas. 
 
John has won many awards in horticulture and environmental issues. He represents the composting industry on the Houston-Galveston Area Council for solid waste. His personal garden has been featured in several horticultural books and "Better Homes and Gardens" magazine. His business has been recognized in the Wall Street Journal for the quality and value of their products. He is a member of the Physics Honor Society and many other professional societies.  John is is the co-author of the book Organic Management for the Professional. 
 
For this newsletter, John contributes articles regularly and is responsible for publishing it.


MARK BOWEN
 
Mark is a native Houstonian, a horticulturist, certified permaculturist and organic specialist with a background in garden design, land restoration and organic project management. He is currently the general manager of Nature's Way Resources. Mark is also the co-author of the book Habitat Gardening for Houston and Southeast Texas, the author of the book Naturalistic Landscaping for the Gulf Coast, co-author of the Bayou Planting Guide and contributing landscape designer for the book Landscaping Homes: Texas. 
 
With respect to this newsletter, Mark serves as a co-editor and periodic article contributor.



PABLO HERNANDEZ
 
Pablo Hernandez is the special projects coordinator for Nature's Way Resources. His realm of responsibilities include: serving as a webmaster, IT support, technical problem solving/troubleshooting, metrics management, quality control, and he is a certified compost facility operator.
 
Pablo helps this newsletter happen from a technical support standpoint. 


 

 
 
COUPON: Nature's Way Resources. 50% off pomegranates, apples, asian pears and selected antique roses. 
 (Offer good for retail purchases of this product (101 Sherbrook Circle, Conroe TX). Expires 07/30/16.
I