JULY 24, 2015

Dear Friends,

Here is the 117th issue of our weekly gardening newsletter for Houston, the Gulf Coast and beyond. We really appreciate all of our readers hanging in there with us, sharing stories and inspiring us in so may ways. 
 
Thanks so much!
 
This newsletter is a project of The Lazy Gardener, Brenda Beust Smith and John Ferguson.(John is with Nature's Way Resources). We also have a great supporting cast of contributing writers and technical specialists who will chime in and tweak away regularly. We would love to keep receiving your input on this newsletter . . . . comments . . . . suggestions . . . . questions. . . .Email your thoughts to: lazygardenerandfriends@gmail.com. Thanks so much for your interest.
 
Please  or sign yourself up to receive this newsletter by clicking the "Join Our Mailing List" link just below. We will never sell or share our mailing list to protect the privacy of our subscribers.

Enjoy!

 
Left to right, my dove wallowvolunteers at Buffalo Bend Nature Park and flowers from Spring Creek Greenway Trail flora (magnolia) and fauna (butterfly on mistflower)


 


 


 

TREASURED WALLOW . . . BUFFALO OF A DIFFERENT ILK . . . GREENWAY DELIGHT . . . PLANT THOSE PEPPERS!
 
BY BRENDA BEUST SMITH


 


 


 

Husband doesn't like my dove wallow.
 
I do.
 
For those of you not familiar with buffaloes, wallows are what someone named the huge dusty depressions created by bison when they would roll around on their backs, probably to relieve an itch?  
 
The phrase dates back to the 12th Century. It's old English for "to roll."  Who else would tell you these things?
 
Our bird feeder, which hangs suspended between two trees, is weight-triggered to stop (HA!), make that, to discourage squirrels. Unfortunately this also discourages my beloved doves. They're a tad too heavy. 
 
Fortunately the multitude of tiny birds that do love the feeder drop tons of seed onto the ground beneath, which happens to be between two trees.  One's a very healthy pine. The other is an oak that's probably dead inside but is still putting out lots of new leaves.
 
The bark is peeling off and it has black ants on it. Trees often die from the inside out, and may put out new leaves for years.  Still, hope springs eternal. But that's another story.
 
Needless to say, no grass grows in my wallow. Tiny bird and squirrel feet have pounded the soil to a concrete consistency. But buffalo didn't care if no grass grew in their wallows and neither do I.
 
SPEAKING OF BUFFALO AND SPOTS WHERE DELIGHTFUL NATIVE FLORA & FAUNA GATHER . . .  
BUFFALO BEND NATURE PARK. On Houston's East Side, Buffalo Bayou Partnership is transforming a former dumpsite into the 10-acre Buffalo Bend Nature Park.  Already improved with three storm water filtration bonds (a wetland ecosystem), a natural amphitheater and 10,000 wetland plants and native trees, the area is now gaining hike and bike trails and other delights. Although this park isn't open to the public yet, log onto http://buffalobayou.org/our-vision/buffalo-bend-nature-park/ for details.
 
* SPRING CREEK GREENWAY TRAIL. In North Harris County, Spring Creek Greenway Trail now connects five Precinct 4 parks from Dennis Johnson to Jones Park. The goal of this 40-mile long trail is to protect the pristine habitat along Spring Creek.  Phase IV's 13.6 mile trail runs from Jesse H. Jones Park and Nature Center to Highway 59 at the San Jacinto River. Geocaches are being placed along the trail between Pundt and Dennis Johnson Parks. Details: http://springcreekgreenway.org/trees.htm andhttp://www.hcp4.net/community/parks/scgw


 

ANOTHER GREAT SIGN OF SUMMER - RED, YELLOW & GREEN CHILI PEPPERS RIPENING ON LUSH GREEN BUSHES
In our spotlight below, Galveston County Master Gardener Gene Speller gives some great tips for growing, harvesting and surviving a Gulf Coast mainstay: chili peppers.  This is just a preview of the more comprehensive program 
 
 


 

 


 


 

 


 

TOP 10 DO'S AND DON'TS FOR CHILI PEPPER GARDENERS


 

(Especially First Timers in the Area)


 

By Gene Speller
Galveston County Master Gardeners 


 

These pointers for gardeners wishing to grow chile peppers for the first time come from years of experience growing many different varieties. You will have a better chance of being a happy chile pepper gardener if you heed these "Don'ts" and practice these "Do's." Purchase plants at a nursery or start seed at home prior to transplanting to a spring/summer garden.  
 
#10.  Don't plant in existing soil. Most Greater Houston/Galveston Area soils are either hard black "gumbo" clay or sandy soil. Clay drains too slowly; sandy too quickly.Do amend existing soil with compost and other recommended soil additives. Guidelines can be found in the "Easy Garden Reference Document, Soil Preparation."  
 
Slope existing soil for better drainage.  A raised bed garden is a good alternative for first time gardeners. Another alternative for those with limited space: containers (5-gal. minimum) with potting soil.
 
#9.    Don't plant in shade.  Do plant in at least 8 hours of sunshine per day.
 
#8.  Don't plant peppers in the same garden space year after year. Do rotate with different vegetable plantings like broccoli, cabbage, peas, beans, and sweet corn.     
 
#7.  Don't  plant in ground until warm enough - after mid March for most of us. Ideal air temperature: 65o to 85 o F.  Do provide cold protection when temps drop into the 40s or below.
 
#6.  Don't plant too close together.  Do place plants at least 24" apart in rows at least 36" apart.  Maintain a clear 12-18" area from lower leaves to soil.  Better spacing promotes a healthier garden.     
 
#5.  Don't let weeds take over.  Do keep garden area clear of weeds and fallen fruit/foliage to minimize disease and insect issues.
 
#4.  Don't pick color hybrid peppers (red, orange, yellow) too soon (still green). Do be patient. Let peppers mature to advertised colors. The difference in flavor, nutrition, and beauty is well worth the wait.
 
#3.  Don't worry about sweet/bell peppers planted next to hot peppers becoming hot. It does not happen in the same generation. Do keep in mind cross pollination could affect subsequent plantings if you save seed.  
 
#2.  Don't worry about eating ornamental peppers grown from seed. Do be aware pepper plants from a nursery may have been treated with an unwanted pesticide.                 
 
#1.  Don't be careless with hot peppers!  Do use rubber gloves when handling. Don't use water to "put out the fire" of a hot pepper if you have over indulged. This still seems to be the #1 mistake of the na´ve. 
 
Do use cold milk instead. Bread helps but not as well as milk.

SAT., AUG. 8: THE GREAT PEPPER EXTRAVAGANZA - SEMINAR & TASTING, 9am-noon, , Galveston County AgriLife Extension in Carbide Park, 4102 Main, La Marque. Free. Master Gardener event. Reservations to galv3@wt.net. Details: 
 
 


 
 

JOHN'S CORNER 

Question From Readers:

Hi there,

I just got finished reading your latest newsletter and would like to suggest a follow-up commentary from Mr. Ferguson regarding Round-Up (glyphosate).

I'm new to organic gardening/lawn care and in my uninformed, misguided former practices, I've been guilty of using Round Up in the past.

So, with this being the case, could Mr. Ferguson perhaps write a column on how to go about remediating any damage from Round Up?  Is it simply a matter of letting time go by and the ingredients bio-degrade by themselves.  Is it a matter of adding compost -- and if so, does the compost need to be added after a certain time period has passed?  Are some other types of additives/supplements needed?

I've attended a couple of OBHA events and have learned quite a bit in the last six months, but I still feel at a loss sometimes on how to handle situations without resorting to "chemicals".  Your newsletter certainly helps in that regard.  Please keep up the great work!

K.K.

 

K.K. there are many factors involved in the breakdown of the chemicals in Round-Up but they will naturally degrade over time.  From memory, breakdown rates vary greatly from a few months to one study that found significant residues after 15 years. Over the next few weeks I will be going back through all the research articles and will cover bio-remediation in detail if I find additional information.

The active ingredient Glyphosate is broken down mainly by bacteria as there is a bacterial population explosion in the soil after application and a decrease in beneficial fungus. This means the bacteria are feeding on the chemicals.  This is also why weed problems almost always get worse after Round-up application.  From soil biology we know that most of the plant species we call "weeds" like soils with lots of bacteria and very little fungus. Hence the application of Round-Up creates conditions that favor weed growth over desired perennial plants.


 

There have been reports that the degradation can be greatly accelerated by the use of products that stimulate the growth of bacteria. So as a first step spraying the affected area with agricultural molasses will provide a food source and stimulate the growth of many species of bacteria. It may take 2 or 3 applications over a couple weeks.  After the initial breakdown has begun it would be beneficial to treat the area with 1/4 inch of a good compost to help re-establish the good microbes as the pathogen levels in the soil will be very high. Without a food source (plants) the pathogen levels will start to decline back to normal levels. In addition, secondary remediation of the initial breakdown products may require various fungus species in the compost.

 

John, enjoyed reading your article and would appreciate any reference points for your information so I can research the matter further

Thank you, D.B.

 

I will be providing some references in later articles.  There is a list of books, magazines, journals, DVD's, e-newsletters, etc. on all sorts of subjects: 


 

http://www.natureswayresources.com/infosheets/sources.html


Many of the e-newsletters by different consumer awareness groups scour the scientific literature for information. They will often give a one or two sentence summary of the article. If one is interested they can click on the link for short summary of a research article. There is almost always a link back to the full research paper as published in the journal. Note: Many journals charge a fee to download articles. One can go to the websites of these consumer groups and search for articles.

You will not find out information to protect your families and pets from publications that accept advertizing from the chemical companies as they are more concerned about the advertising revenue than helping their readers. A few magazines that are written for the average reader are Mother Earth News, "E", Acres,USA, Organic Gardening and Organic Living.


 



 

WEEDS and HERBICIDES


 

"Round-Up" (Part 2)


 

In the book "When Weeds Talk", Brookside Laboratories ran tests that showed only one application of the herbicide tied up 84 pounds of pure phosphate per acre! This type of nutrient tie-up leads to compaction and decreases the depth of available topsoil for roots to grow. With a smaller root zone the gardener must water more often and fertilize more often.  It is then often recommended to aerate the soil to break up the compaction, another cost. The tight compacted soils favor disease development and of course, more weed pressure (one of the roles of the plants we call weeds is to loosen tight compacted soils).  The process of using just one application of herbicide greatly increases the problems, also the time and money required to take care of your landscape.

Experienced gardeners know that plant growth hormones are very important to have plants that grow fast and are healthy. One of the most powerful of these hormones is the group called "auxins".  One study (L.T. Biosyn Labs) found a 96% reduction in this hormone after a single Round-up application.


 

Similarly many enzymes required for plant health are suppressed as shown in the chart below. Note: The slide caption is "Fold" not percent change.


 

This slide is courtesy of Dr. Don Huber , Purdue University


 


 

The combined effects of Glyphosate from nutrient tie-up, increased pathogens in the soil, reduction in plant hormones, reduction in enzyme efficiency, etc. create weak plants that are very susceptible to insects and diseases.


 

We have all heard the phrase, "survival of the fittest".  In nature the microbes that we call diseases or pathogens and the insects we call pests, have a role to play.  Their job is to get rid of weak and unhealthy plant species so only the strong survive. Hence, they attack plants grown in herbicide treated soils or plants treated with herbicides (the herbicide is excreted into the soil by root exudates).


 

The slide below is pictorial summary of all the damage done by Glyphosate.


 

This slide is courtesy of Dr. Don Huber , Purdue University


 


 

 

Round-Up is slow to breakdown in the soil, hence the negative effects tend to be cumulative. The slide below of a wheat crop illustrates this effect. The first year Round-Up was applied the wheat crop germinated and grew, however by the 10th year of using Round-Up the seeds could not germinate and the ones that did had problems growing and were not healthy. We see the same effects in our landscape where Round-up has been used repeatedly.


 

This slide is courtesy of Dr. Don Huber , Purdue University


 


 

Note: Don Huber, PhD is now Professor Emeritus of Plant Pathology at Purdue University.  He has over 50 years of agricultural research on soil and plant pathogens and microbial ecology. He has served as Associate Director of the Armed Forces Medical Intelligence Center after 41+ years of active and reserve duty with the rank of Colonel. He has served as a consultant for the Center for Disease Control and many other organizations.


 

It has been stated that Glyphosate is many time more toxic than DDT and in conjunction with GMO crops a threat to the survival of humanity.


 


   WEEKLY GARDENING EVENTS &
ANNOUNCEMENTS 
CALENDAR


TO SUBMIT EVENTS:   

Find a similar event in our calendar below and copy the format EXACTLY. 

Then you can add additional information. Email to lazy gardener@sbcglobal.net

Not using our format will result in a delay in publication.   

Events will not be picked up from newsletters.

  

   

  

  
 
 

 

SAT., JULY 25: PLUMERIA SOCIETY OF AMERICA SALE, 9:30am-3pm, Fort Bend County Fairgrounds, Richmond.  Details: www.theplumeriasociety.org 

  

SAT., JULY 25: URBAN HARVEST'S FALL VEGETABLE GARDENING CLASS, 9am-11:30am.  $45. Location TBA. Details: 713-880-5540 or www.urbanharvest.org.

  

SAT., JULY 25: A HOMEOWNER'S GUIDE TO WEED CONTROL BY ANNA WYGRYS,9-11am, Galveston County AgriLife Extension, Carbide Park, 4102 Main, La Marque. Free. Email reservations: galv3@wt.net. Details: www.aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston; 281-534-3413

  

TUES., JULY 28: HARRIS COUNTY MASTER GARDENERS OPEN GARDEN DAY AND SEMINAR: FALL VEGETABLE GARDENING, 9-11:30am, 3033 Bear Creek Drive. Free. Details: https://hcmga.tamu.edu/Public/docs/2015-open-garden-days.pdf  281-855-5600

  

  

SAT., AUG. 1: BACKYARD GARDENING - STRAWBERRIES BY ROBERT MARSHALL, 9-11am, Galveston County AgriLife Extension in Carbide Park, 4102 Main, La Marque. Free. Master Gardener event. Reservations to galv3@wt.net. Details: www.aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston; 281-534-3413

 

SAT, AUG. 1: CONSTRUCTING THE HOME VEGETABLE AND FRUIT GARDEN, 9-11:30am, University of St. Thomas,  Strake Hall, Room 207, 3918 Yoakum Blvd., $45. Urban Harvest event. Details: 713-880-5540 or www.urbanharvest.org.

 

MON., AUG. 3: OPEN GARDEN DAY & PLANT SALE WITH HARRIS COUNTY MASTER GARDENERS AT PRECINCT 2, 8:30-11am, Genoa Friendship Garden,1202 Genoa Red Bluff Rd. Free. Details:https://hcmga.tamu.edu   

  

TUES., AUG 4: ALL ABOUT HUMMINGBIRDS (children), 9am-12:30pm, The Arbor Gate, 15635 FM 2920, Tomball.  Free.  Details: www.arborgate.com or 281-351-8851

    

SAT., AUG. 8: THE GREAT PEPPER EXTRAVAGANZA - SEMINAR & TASTING, 9am-noon, , Galveston County AgriLife Extension in Carbide Park, 4102 Main, La Marque. Free. Master Gardener event. Reservations to galv3@wt.net. Details: www.aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston; 281-534-3413

 

SAT., AUG. 8: PROPAGATE YOUR OWN PLANTS, 9-11:30am, University of St. Thomas,  Strake Hall, Room 207, 3918 Yoakum Blvd., $45. Urban Harvest event. Details: 713-880-5540 or www.urbanharvest.org.


TUES., AUG. 11: SOIL FOOD WEB - LATEST ADVANCES IN SOIL BIOLOGY BY ELAINE INGHAM, Ph.D., 8am-4pm, Museum of Natural Science, 1 Hermann Circle. Organic Horticultural Benefit Alliance (OHBA) event. Fee, Register at: www.ohbaonline.org

 

TUES., AUG. 11: ADVANCES IN SOIL BIOLOGY BY DR. ELAINE INGHAM, 8am-4pm, Houston Museum of Natural Sciences, 1 Hermann Park Circle. Organic Horticulture Benefits Alliance (OHBA) & Houston Museum of Natural Sciences event. Register: www.ohbaonline.org or facebook.com/OHBAonline

 

THURS., AUG. 13: WATERING SYSTEMS BY BAXTER WILLIAMS, 7:30pm, St. Andrews Episcopal Church parish hall, 1819 Heights Blvd. Free. Houston Rose Society event. Details: www.houstonrose.org 

 

SAT., AUG.15: STARTING A COMMUNITY OR SCHOOL GARDEN WORKSHOP, 8:30am-2pm, University of St. Thomas, Robertson Hall, Room 116, 3918 Yoakum Blvd., $20. Urban Harvest event. Details713-880-5540 or www.urbanharvest.org.

 

MON., AUG. 17: OPEN GARDEN DAY & PLANT SALE WITH HARRIS COUNTY MASTER GARDENERS AT PRECINCT 2, 8:30-11am, Genoa Friendship Garden,1202 Genoa Red Bluff Rd. Free. Details:https://hcmga.tamu.edu 

 

WED., AUG. 19: BEGONIAS BY TONY COLLINS, 10am, Clear Lake Park Meeting Room, 5001 NASA Parkway, Seabrook. Free. Harris County Master Gardeners at Precinct 2. Details: https://hcmga.tamu.edu 

 
THURS., AUG. 20: PLANTING FOR THE HOUSTON TOAD AND OTHER LOCAL AMPHIBIANS BY Dr. CASSIDY JOHNSON. 7-9pm. Houston Arboretum and Nature Center, 4505 Woodway. Free. Native Plant Society of Texas - Houston Chapter event. Details: npsot.org/wp/houston/activities/monthly-meetings/

SAT., AUG. 22: THE PATIO GARDEN BY TOM LEROY, , 9-11am, Galveston County AgriLife Extension in Carbide Park, 4102 Main, La Marque. Free. Master Gardener event. Reservations to galv3@wt.net. Details: www.aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston; 281-534-3413

 

SAT., AUG. 22: RAINWATER HARVESTING FOR HOMEOWNERS, 9-11:30am, University of St. Thomas,  Strake Hall, Room 207, 3918 Yoakum Blvd., $45. Urban Harvest event. Details: 713-880-5540 or www.urbanharvest.org.

 

SAT., AUG. 25: STARTING A COMMUNITY OR SCHOOL GARDEN WORKSHOP, 8:30am-2pm, University of St. Thomas Robertson Hall, Room 116, 3812 Yoakum Blvd. $20. Urban Harvest event. Registration required. Details: www.urbanharvest.org/classes-calendar or 713-880-5540.   


 
SAT., AUG. 29: SUCCESSFUL FALL VEGETABLE GARDENING BY LUKE STRIPLING, 9-11:30am, Galveston County AgriLife Extension in Carbide Park, 4102 Main, La Marque. Free. Master Gardener event. Reservations to galv3@wt.net. Details: www.aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston; 281-534-3413

 

SAT., AUG. 29: ALL ABOUT HERBS, 9-11am, University of St. Thomas,  Strake Hall, Room 207, 3918 Yoakum Blvd., $45. Urban Harvest event. Details: 713-880-5540  or www.urbanharvest.org.

 
TUES., SEPT. 1: PRE-ORDER BULB DEADLINE FOR THE OCT. 1-3 2015 BULB & PLANT MART. Details: www.gchouston.org, 713-683-9450 or cgerikson99@gmail.com.
 
THURS., SEPT. 17: PREVIEW OF UPCOMING WILDSCAPES WORKSHOP PLANT SALE BY JOE BLANTON. 7-9pm. Houston Arboretum and Nature Center, 4505 Woodway. Free. Native Plant Society of Texas - Houston Chapter event. Details: npsot.org/wp/houston/activities/monthly-meetings/ 

MON.-TUES., SEPT. 21-22: LANDSCAPE DESIGN SCHOOL COURSE III, George HW Bush Presidential Ampitheater, College Station. $145 by Sept. 1; $165 after. Texas Garden Clubs, Inc.,/AgriLife Extension Service/Bush Library event. Registration/details: texaslandscapedesignschool@gmail.com or Michele Wehrheim, 313-649-1067

  

THURS.-SAT., OCT. 1-3: 2015 BULB & PLANT MART, St. John the Divine Church, 2450 River Oaks Blvd. Free. Garden Club of Houston event. Details: www.gchouston.org.     

 

SAT.-SUN., OCT. 3-4: SPRING BRANCH AFRICAN VIOLET CLUB ANNUAL FALL SALE, 10am-4pm Sat.; 10am-3pm Sun. Judson Robinson Jr. Community Center, 2020 Hermann Dr. Free. Details: Karla Ross, 281-748-8417, kjwross@yahoo.com.

 

TUES., OCT. 13: PLUMERIA SOCIETY OF AMERICA QUARTERLY MEET, 7pm, Garden Center, 1500 Hermann Drive in Hermann Park. Details: www.theplumeriasociety.org
 

THUR.-SUN., OCT. 15-18:  MASTER COMPOSTER PROGRAM, Green Building Resource Center, 1002 Washington Ave. Details: Steve Stelzer, 832-394-9050, steve.stelzer@houstontx.gov 

  

SAT., OCT. 24: HOUSTON ROSE SOCIETY'S ROSE-A-PALOOZA, Harris County AgriLife Extension Center, 3033 Bear Creek Drive. 10am educational programs; noon - Rose Show. $30. Details: www.houstonrose.org ; suzzieq1971@gmail.com; gayeh@LPM-triallaw.com 

  

 

  

  

If we inspire you to attend any of these events, please let them know  

you heard about it inTHE LAZY GARDENER & FRIENDS NEWSLETTER!

 

 

TO SUBMIT EVENTS:   

Find a similar event in our calendar below and copy the format EXACTLY. 

Then you can add additional information. Email to lazy gardener@sbcglobal.net

Not using our format will result in a delay in publication.   

Events will not be picked up from newsletters.

 

 
THIS NEWSLETTER IS MADE
POSSIBLE BY THE FOLLOWING SPONSORS






                                             


                                                ABOUT US



 
BRENDA BEUST SMITH
 
WE KNOW HER BEST AS THE LAZY GARDENER . . . 

. . . but Brenda Beust Smith is also:

   * a national award-winning writer & editor
   * a nationally-published writer & photographer 
   * a national horticultural speaker
   * a former Houston Chronicle reporter
   
When the Chronicle discontinued Brenda's 45-year-old Lazy Gardener" print column a couple of years ago, it ranked as the longest-running, continuously-published local newspaper column in the Greater Houston area.

Brenda's gradual sideways step from Chronicle reporter into gardening writing led first to an 18-year series of when-to-do-what Lazy Gardener Calendars, then to her Lazy Gardener's Guide book and now to her Lazy Gardener's Guide on CD (which retails for $20. However, $5 of every sale is returned to the sponsoring group at her speaking engagements).

A Harris County Master Gardener, Brenda has served on the boards of many Greater Houston area horticulture organizations and has hosted local radio and TV shows, most notably a 10+-year Lazy Gardener run on HoustonPBS (Ch. 8) and her call-in "EcoGardening" show on KPFT-FM. 

Brenda recently ended her decades-long stint as Production Manager of the Garden Club of America's BULLETIN magazine. Although still an active horticulture lecturer and broad-based freelance writer,  Brenda's main focus now is  THE LAZY GARDENER & FRIENDS HOUSTON GARDEN NEWSLETTER with John Ferguson and Mark Bowen of Nature's Way Resources.

A native of New Orleans and graduate of St. Agnes Academy and the University of Houston, Brenda lives in Aldine and is married to the now retired Aldine High School Coach Bill Smith. They have one son, Blake.

Regarding this newsletter, Brenda is the lead writer, originator of it and the daily inspiration for it. We so appreciate the way she has made gardening such a fun way to celebrate life together for such a long time.
 
 
JOHN FERGUSON
 
John is a native Houstonian and has over 27 years of business experience. He owns Nature's Way Resources, a composting company that specializes in high quality compost, mulch, and soil mixes. He holds a MS degree in Physics and Geology and is a licensed Soil Scientist in Texas. 
 
John has won many awards in horticulture and environmental issues. He represents the composting industry on the Houston-Galveston Area Council for solid waste. His personal garden has been featured in several horticultural books and "Better Homes and Gardens" magazine. His business has been recognized in the Wall Street Journal for the quality and value of their products. He is a member of the Physics Honor Society and many other professional societies.  John is is the co-author of the book Organic Management for the Professional. 
 
For this newsletter, John contributes articles regularly and is responsible for publishing it.


PABLO HERNANDEZ
 
Pablo Hernandez is the special projects coordinator for Nature's Way Resources. His realm of responsibilities include: serving as a webmaster, IT support, technical problem solving/troubleshooting, metrics management, quality control, and he is a certified compost facility operator.
 
Pablo helps this newsletter happen from a technical support standpoint. 





 
 
 
 
COUPON: Nature's Way Resources. 20% off our: Native Soil Mix. http://natureswayresources.com/products.html 
. (Offer good for retail purchases of this product by the cubic yard at Nature's Way Resources (101 Sherbrook Circle, Conroe TX). Expires 08/03/15.
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COUPON: Nature's Way Resources. 25% off our: ROSES. 
. (Offer good for retail purchases of this product by the cubic yard at Nature's Way Resources (101 Sherbrook Circle, Conroe TX). Expires 08/03/15.
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