February 27, 2015

Dear Friends,

Here is the 96th issue of our weekly gardening newsletter for Houston, the Gulf Coast and beyond. This is a project of The Lazy Gardener, Brenda Beust Smith, John Ferguson and Mark Bowen (both John and Mark are with Nature's Way Resources). We also have a great supporting cast of contributing writers and technical specialists who will chime in and tweak away regularly. We would love to keep receiving your input on this newsletter . . . . comments . . . . suggestions . . . . questions. . . .Email your thoughts to: lazygardenerandfriends@gmail.com. Thanks so much for your interest.
 
Please  or sign yourself up to receive this newsletter by clicking the "Join Our Mailing List" link just below. We will never sell or share our mailing list to protect the privacy of our subscribers.

Enjoy!



THIS WEEK: Left, It's "What's this flower ...?" time again. Center, Kathy Huber retiring? We're so sad! 
Right, just a few of Baxter & Patsy's gorgeous roses.

 
OUR GARDENING HORIZON IS ABOUT TO SIGNIFICANTLY 

CHANGE . . . WHAT'S THIS FLOWER? . . . BAXTER'S ROSE TIPS

BY BRENDA BEUST SMITH

 
For almost three decades, Kathy Huber has been our gardening mentor, guide, educator, advocate and, most importantly, my good friend. 

Even more than that, for almost as long, she edited my Houston Chronicle gardening columns and I relied so heavily on her expertise and absolute thoroughness in every aspect of gardening coverage we tackled.  

Even before that, she was my copy editor on general assignment articles - a wonderful stickler for correct grammar, perfect punctuation, minute fact-checks. We go back a LONG way.

Kathy is retiring. She's earned it!  She was Chronicle Features Copy Desk Chief before becoming, in 1988, the Chronicle's first full-time (and only) Garden Editor. She's a Texas Master Gardener, author of The Texas Flower Garden, a familiar speaker at area gardening events and a member of many local gardening boards.  

I can't even imagine a Houston garden scene without Kathy Huber's input. Hopefully she will re-surface to continue as a gardening advisor in some capacity.
 
Ever wonder what Kathy's own garden looks like? Houston House and Home  magazine did a wonderful article on Kathy last year, with beautiful pictures taken by her husband, in-demand photographer John Everett. Check it out: 
 

And don't miss her farewell column: "Dear Readers, Thanks for all the memories... " 

A wonderful chance to congratulate Kathy on her retirement is coming up.  Kathy will be the official Ribbon Cutter to open the March 6-8 2015 Azalea Trail

This free activity March 6 at 10:30am kicks off this very special Trail, it's 80th birthday, at the Lazy Lane entrance to Bayou Bend, 2940 Lazy Lane. Don't come late, it doesn't take long. 

No ticket is necessary for the free ribbon-cutting ceremony, but it will not include access to Bayou Bend, a perennial stop on the Azalea Trail. But Trail tickets will be available at the ribbon cutting, including Bayou Bend, home of the late Miss Ima Hogg, famed philanthropist who created a museum that now houses one of the nation's finest collections of American antiques, along with 18 acres of organically-maintained, Southern-influenced gardens. It was Miss Ima who introduced azaleas to Houston.

At one stop on the Trail, however, admission is free all three days: the River Oaks Garden Club's Forum of Civics, 2503 Westheimer at Kirby, where numerous also-free activities are planned, including:
     * "Ask The Experts" - bring your gardening questions. 
     *  A "Flower Shop" where flowers will be available for sale. 
     * A 2 p.m. flower arranging demonstration by award-winning ROGC members
     * A spotlight on the Sundial Garden, recently been renovated by McDugald-Steele, on the Forum's east side. (The west garden will be updated next year.)
 
While you're there, look for the incredible crape myrtle trees in all their winter bark sculptural splendor.  If you are considering wacking  your crapes off across the top (crape murder!), check these out first and see what a horrible mistake you will be making.  http://www.riveroaksgardenclub.org

 

 
CAN YOU IDENTIFY THIS PLANT FOR ME. . .

 

Perhaps it's we're all so desperate for a true indication spring is coming that several readers have sent in pictures lately asking "What is this flower?"  All three of these are definitely spring joys for us and should be in every yard:

Left to right above:
* PINK MAGNOLIA (Magnolia  soulangeana or tulip magnolia). While these can get quite large (  Jane Hoffert Moore's record-book tree in the Museum District was almost three stories high), they more often are moderate growers. But when they're in bloom, wow, do they immediately draw the eye!  But, be forewarned. Jane's treasured tree became infested with ball moss and despite heroic efforts to save it, gradually succumbed. Imagine the delight of Jane and everyone who mourned this tree loss, when new branches sprouted from the base.  May take them a while to reach such proportions again, but just the fact that green leaves have reappeared is cause for celebration.

 
CAROLINA JESSAMINE  (Gelsemium sempervirens). Mine's been blooming for quite a while, but soon the woods north and east of Houston should be exploding in yellow, if they aren't already. This is an evergreen vine so is a great choice for covering fences for a little privacy.  

 
* REDBUDS. Most of what you see around Houston are Eastern Redbuds (Cercis canadensis var. canadensis).  Not a bad choice - as all the incredible color testifies. But a better choice is our Texas redbud (Cercis canadensis var. texensis) or Mexican redbud (Cercis canadensis var. mexicana).

 
IF YOUR ROSES AREN'T ALREADY IN BLOOM, they should be soon. As promised last week, below are tips from Rosarian Extraordinaire Baxter Williams. At the March 14-15 Galveston Home and Garden Show, Baxter will speak Saturday at 1pm, right before I get to do my dog-and-pony-show at 2. I hope you'll drop by to see us and the other great speakers.  (Sat.-Sun., Mar. 14-15 Galveston Home & Garden Show, Convention Center, 56th street at Seawall Blvd. Fees, hours: www.galvestonhomeandgarden.com)

If you've never had a chance to see Baxter & Patsy's incredible rose gardens in Pasadena during one of the annual Houston Rose Society garden tours, there's a glimpse at the top of this column. What you're seeing, of course, is only a fraction of their 500-plus bushes. An American Rose Society award recipient, Baxter is as generous with his expertise as he is totally knowledgeable - as he shows with his Spotlight tips below.

Hopefully Baxter will so whet your appetite, you'll check the calendar for these other learn-about-growing-roses here (it's different!). Check our calendar below for even more.

Wed., Mar. 11: "Why Do Rose Grow by the Side of the Road? ... and Why Do They Not Grow in My Garden!" by Jon Jons. 10:30 am, League City Garden Club, 2105 Dickinson Ave. Free.www.leaguecitygardenclub.org 
* Sat., Mar. 14: "Roses," by Mary Fulgham. 10:00 am to noon, Mary will be available for nursery assistance after her talk. Congo Nursery, 2018 Strawberry Rd, Pasadena. Free. www.congonursery.webs.com
Sat., Mar. 28: "Roses and Companion Plants," by Gaye Hammond. 10:00 am and 2:00 pm, The Enchanted Garden and Enchanted Nursery, Richmond, TX. www.myenchanted.com 

Another great source for local horticultural (and more) events: "Cheryl On The Beach."

* Brenda's GROUP LECTURES include: "How to Reduce the Size of Your Front Lawn to Save Water  Without Infuriating Your Neighbors," "Landscaping for Security," "10 Commandments of Lazy Gardening," and "What's Blooming in the Lazy Gardener's Garden." Details: lazygardener@sbcglobal.net. 



 

 

Among the many good advice offerings on the Houston Rose Society's website (www.houstonrose.org) is an introduction to the Griffin Buck Roses which HRS is recommending for Greater Houston area gardeners. Among them, as pictured on the website are, left to right, are Frontier Twirl and Wild Ginger

 

Some Rose Tips from Baxter Williams

Rose growing has been said to be relatively hard to do in the Houston/Galveston area, but such just isn't true. Anyone can successfully grow our National Flower --- "The Queen of Flowers" --- the rose. But the real secret to doing so with ease for us is learning the proper horticulture for growing them on the Gulf Coast. So let's mention the most important facets.

 
1. Plant roses in the sunniest spot in the yard. Roses aren't very efficient converters of solar energy, and should receive 6-8 hours of full sun per day. Less isn't good.

 
2. Raised beds are recommendedMost of our soils are black clay, which is not friable enough and therefore doesn't drain well. Raised beds inherently drain by gravity, and won't allow too much water to remain in the root zones of roses. Too much water excludes oxygen to the roots, and that is bad.

 
3. Choose No. 1 bushesCheap bushes are poor choices. The best ones are 3- to 5-gallon pots, and have been fed and kept free of diseases prior to your purchase.

 
4. Don't fertilize a newly planted bush until it has bloomed once in your flower bedAs a bush puts out new roots it is best to not have roots against fertilizer granules. After that first bloom, begin to give the bush required nutrients.

 
5. The most important tip is to KEEP THE LEAVES ON THE BUSHMost dead bushes have been weakened by allowing disease to invade the bush. A new bush won't likely come to you with disease in it, so if it becomes diseased it is likely because of infections in neighboring bushes in your garden or across the fences. Usual diseases are blackspot and mildew, both of which are treatable. There are NO roses in today's market that won't contract a disease, if exposed to enough of it...NONE. A leaflet with a black dot is a doomed leaflet.

 
6. There are people to help youYour Houston Rose Society has American Rose Society Consulting Rosarians who can give you free advice. And the monthly Rose-Ette newsletter is the best one in the nation. Membership cost is less than one rose bush, and can be paid for on-line at www.houstonrose.org

 
7. Pruning is importantBushes grow best when properly pruned. And using the right tools in the proper manner is key to success. Sharp bypass shears are the right choice, and there is much misinformation about when and where and how to cut stems for best flower production, so ask a Consulting Rosarian to show you how to do it.

 
8. Water is importantToo much cause the leaves to turn yellow and fall off. Too little causes the leaves to turn yellow and fall off.
 
Baxter Williams is an American Rose Society Master Rosarian, and has been growing roses in the Houston area since early 1967. His garden has approximately 500 bushes of all types. He currently serves as Programs VP of the Houston Rose Society, the nation's largest local rose society. Email Baxter at bxtwms@att.net.

 


 
 
JOHN'S CORNER 
 
Organic Fertilizers and Nutrients - 27

MINERAL SANDS - PART 3


There are many types of mineral sands (sometimes called rock dusts) used in horticulture and gardening. Each offers different nutrients and benefits. We have talked about granite and basalt sand the last couple weeks. Today I want to look at Lava Sand which is a 3rd type of igneous material that is used as rock dusts to increase the fertility of soils.

Most of the lava sand sold in Texas comes from New Mexico. A few years ago I visited several of the mines that were selling lava sand and learned a little bit about them. There are many types of lava and depending on many factors related to chemistry and physics of the lava, these lavas produce different types of rocks. At the mines in New Mexico some of these lavas had a lot of dissolved gases in them that were trapped as it cooled. As a result they are lighter and softer than granite or basalts. This type of lava rock is crushed to make decorative landscaping stones and gravels. Lava sand is the by-product of this mining and crushing and depending on the minerals in the lava it may be reddish or black. The magma that produced the lava flows often cools relatively quickly in geologic terms, often leaving the rock material paramagnetic. The crushing and screening process often produces very small particles (silt sized to fine sand) that are called "lava sand". These smaller particles will help courser and sandier soils hold water better. They do not decompose over time as would organic materials like humates or compost so they can permanently change the physical properties of the soil. The relatively quick cooling (geologically speaking) leave the minerals in lava sand unstable as compared to granite or basalt, hence they release quicker into the soil.
The beneficial properties of lava sand varies greatly depending on the source.
SUMMARY:

Lava sand is another tool in a gardeners tool box. It is often added to soils to improve their physical properties and add valuable trace elements. Often available in North and West Texas with very limited availability along the Gulf Coast, hence other rock sands are a better choice for this area.


PROS:

- source of a few major nutrients
- small amounts of minor and trace elements
- releases nutrients relatively quick as compared to granite or basalt
- aerates heavy tight clay soils
- helps light sandy soils hold moisture
- improves soils structure for many soils
- may be a source of Paramagnetism
- fine sizes are often added to vermi-compost bins to use as grit
- lighter than granite or basalt sand
- increases the CEC (cation exchange capacity) of soils

CONS:
- expensive since shipping charges from New Mexico are high
- may release nutrients too quickly
- often dusty when dry
- less diversity and quantity of nutrients as compared to granite or basalt sand
- quality and value varies greatly depending on the source
- extremely limited availability




 

  
   WEEKLY GARDENING EVENTS &
ANNOUNCEMENTS
 
CALENDAR

TO SUBMIT EVENTS: Find a similar event in our calendar below and copy the format EXACTLY. 

Then you can add additional information. Email to lazy gardener@sbcglobal.net

Any other formatting will result in a delay in publication. Events will not be picked up from newsletters.


 

Sat., Feb. 28: Harris County Master Gardener Tomato & Pepper Sale & Symposia. AgriLife Extension office, 3033 Bear Creek Dr. Details: http://hcmga.tamu.edu/Public/pubSales.aspx

Sat., Feb. 28: Fort Bend Master Gardeners Vegetable-Herb Plant Sale, 9am-noon or sell-out, Agricultural Center Greenhouse, 1402 Band Road, Rosenberg. Details: www.fbmg.org or 281-341-7068.

Sat., Feb. 28: Soil Management for the Home Garden by Dr. Joe Novak, 9-11am, White Oak Conference Center, 7603 Antoine. Near Northwest Management District event. $20. Details/registration: www.nnmd.org or 713-895-8021


Sat., Feb. 28: Successful Organic Gardening by Michael Serant, Suzzanne Chapman and Danny Milikin, 9am-noon, Kingwood Community Center, 4102 Rustic Woods Dr., Kingwood. $5. Register here. Details:  281-855-5600

  

Sat., Feb. 28: Spring Vegetable Gardening by Ray Sher, 9-11:30am, University of Houston Campus, 4361 Wheeler. $35. Details: 713-880-5540, www.urbanharvest.org/classes-calendar 

  

Sat., Feb. 28: Make Your Lawn Luxuious-Spring Lawn Care, 10:15am, Cornelius Nursery, 2233 S. Voss. Details:corneliusnurseries.com/events.  


Mon., Mar. 2: Citrus Gardening with a Harris County Master Gardener, 1-2pm, Thomas A. Glazier Senior Education Center, 16600 Pine Forest Lane. Free. Details: 713-274-3250; www.pct3.hctx.net/senior/glaziersec.aspx 


Tues., Mar. 3: Gardening for Jewels...Hummingbirds by Deborah Repasz, 6:30-8:30pm, Galveston County AgriLife Extension in Carbide Park, 4102 Main, La Marque. Free. Galveston County Master Gardener event. Details www.aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston


Thurs., Mar. 5: History of Shangri La Botanical Gardens by Joseph Johnson, 9:30am, Municipal Utility Building, 805 Hidden Canyon Drive, Katy.  Free.  Nottingham Country Garden Club program. Details: nottinghamgardenclub.org;  o713-870-5915 or 979-885-6199

  

Thurs., Mar. 5: Plant and Seed Swap, 10-11am, Thomas A. Glazier Senior Education Center, 16600 Pine Forest Lane. Free. Details: 713-274-3250; www.pct3.hctx.net/senior/glaziersec.aspx 


Fri.-Sun., Mar. 6-8: 2015 80th Annual Azalea Trail. River Oaks Garden Club event. Details;


Sat., Mar. 7: Compost Class, 10-11am, The Woodlands Township Parks, Recreation and Environmental Services Campus, 2801 Millennium Forest Dr. The Woodlands.  Free. Co-sponsorsThe Woodlands Township, Montgomery County Master Gardeners, Nature's Way Resources & Waste Management. Details: http://thewoodlandstownship-tx.gov or 281-201-3800


Sat., Mar. 7: Pest ID and Management in the Home Garden Garden by Dr. Joe Novak, 9-11am, White Oak Conference Center, 7603 Antoine. Near Northwest Management District event. $20. Details/registration: www.nnmd.org 

or 713-895-8021

Sat., Mar. 7: Successful Organic Gardening by Michael Serant, Boone Holladay and Danny Milikin, 9am-noon, Harmon Center, 226 Matlage Way, Sugar Land. $5. Register here. Details:  281-855-5600


Sat., Mar. 7: Starting a School or Community Garden Series, #1 of 2 by Becky Blanton, 9-11:30am, Urban Harvest, 2311 Canal St., $50. Details: 713-880-5540, www.urbanharvest.org/classes-calendar 

  

Sat., Mar., 7: Real Food, Garden-Grown Vegetables, 10:15am, Cornelius Nursery, 2233 S. Voss. Details:corneliusnurseries.com/events.  


Sat., Mar. 7, Precinct 2, Harris County Master Gardeners Perennial, Pepper, Tomato and Herb Sale, Campbell Hall, Pasadena Fairgrounds, 7600 Red Bluff, Pasadena.   8am-Preview of Perennials by Heidi Sheesley, 9am-1pm- Sale.  Details: https://hcmga.tamu.edu 


Sat., Mar. 7: NatureFest, 9am-3:30pm, Jesse H. Jones Park & Nature Center, 20634 Kenswick Dr., Humble. Free. Details: 281-445-8588; www.hcp4.net/community/parks/jones 


Sat.-Sun., Mar. 7-8: Spring Branch African Violet Club 35th Annual Show and Spring Sale, Judson Robinson Jr., Community Center, 2020 Hermann Park Drive. Sat.: Show 1-5pm, Sale 9am-5pm. Sun.: Show & Sale 10am-3pm. Details: Karla Ross, 281-748-8417, kjwross@yahoo.com


Tues., Mar. 10: Plumeria Society of America quarterly meet, 7pm, Garden Center, 1500 Hermann Drive in Hermann Park. Details: www.theplumeriasociety.org


Thurs., Mar. 12, Documenting Your Garden by Harris County Master Gardeners. 6:30-8:30pm. Barbara Bush Library, 6817 Cypresswood Dr., Spring Free. Details: http://harris.agrilife.org/hort. Register 281-855-5600. 

  

Thurs., Mar. 12 : Fertilizers and Soil Additives by Dr. Robert Unruh, 7:30pm, St. Andrews Episcopal Church parish hall, 1819 Heights Blvd. Free. Houston Rose Society event. Details: www.houstonrose.org 


Sat., Mar. 14: City of Houston STAR Master Composter program begins. 20-hour, 10am-2pm class meets alternate Saturdays through May 9, City of Houston Building Resource Center, 1002 Washington. Details: 

http://www.greenhoustontx.gov/gbrceducation-2015spring.pdf


Sat., Mar. 14: Growing Vegetables in Containers Garden by Dr. Joe Novak, 9-11am, White Oak Conference Center, 7603 Antoine. Near Northwest Management District event. $20. Details/registration: www.nnmd.org or 713-895-8021. 

  

Sat., Mar 14: Fashionista Flower Design, 10:15am, Cornelius Nursery, 2233 S. Voss. Details:corneliusnurseries.com/events.


Sat., Mar. 14: Open Days at Peckerwood Gardens, Hempstead. Garden Conservancy event. Tours 11am & 1pm. $10. Details: peckerwoodgarden.org, 979-826-3232; info@peckerwoodgarden.org


Sat.-Sun., Mar. 14-15 Galveston Home & Garden Show, Convention Center, 56th street at Seawall Blvd. Horticulture speakers: Saturday 10:30am-Rainwater Harvesting-Jim Jahnke; 11:30-Tree Conservancy-Priscilla Files; 1-Roses-Baxter Williams; 2:30-Lazy Gardening-Brenda Beust Smith. Sunday 11:30-Growing Peppers-Gene Sepller; 12:30-Plumeria-Loretta Osteen. Other speakers,fees, hours: www.galvestonhomeandgarden.com  


Tues., March 17: Hummingbirds!  Allen or Rufous, it's all Selaphorus to Me. Details: http://sugarglandgardenclub.org 


Mon., Mar. 16: Open Garden Day with Harris County Master Gardeners at Precinct 2, 8:30-11am, Genoa Friendship Garden,1202 Genoa Red Bluff Rd. Details:https://hcmga.tamu.edu 


Wed., Mar. 18: Texas SuperStars by Paul Winski, 10 am, Clear Lake  Park Meeting Room, 5001 NASA Parkway, Seabrook.  Harris County Master Gardeners at Precinct 2 event.  Details: https://hcmga.tamu.edu 


Tues., Mar. 17: Honey Bees Around The Garden by Stewart McAdoo and Robert Marshall,

6:30-8:30pm, Galveston County AgriLife Extension in Carbide Park, 4102 Main, La Marque. Free. Galveston County Master Gardener event. Details www.aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston
 
Thurs., Mar. 19: Providing Homes for Outdoor Wildlife by a Texas Parks and Wildlife Urban Biologist,
 

Thur., Mar. 19, Documenting Your Garden by Harris County Master Gardeners. 6:30-8:30pm. Freeman Branch Library. 16616 Diana Lane, Free. Details: http://harris.agrilife.org/hort. Register 281-855-5600

  

Fri., Mar. 20: March Mart Plant Sale, noon-4pm. Mercer Botanic Gardens, 22306 Aldine Westfield Road, Humble. Free. Details: http://www.hcp4.net/community/parks/mercer 

  

Sat., Mar. 21, March Mart Plant Sale. 8am-4pm. Mercer Botanic Gardens, 22306 Aldine Westfield Road, Humble. Free. Details: http://www.hcp4.net/community/parks/mercer; 281-443-8731


Sat., Mar 21: MCMGA Spring Plant Sale, Montgomery Co. Extension Office, 9020 Airport Road, Conroe. 8am: Program; 9am-1pm: Sale Details: 936-539-7824 or www.mcmga.com


Sat., Mar. 21, Documenting Your Garden by Harris County Master Gardeners. 10am-Noon. Maude Smith Marks Library 1815 Westgreen Blvd. Katy, TX. Free. Details: http://harris.agrilife.org/hort. Register 281-855-5600


Sat., Mar. 21: Save Water and Money with Drip Irrigation, 10:15am, Cornelius Nursery, 2233 S. Voss. Details: corneliusnurseries.com/events.

 

Sat., Mar. 21: The Culture and Care of Palms by O.J. Miller,  9-11:30am, and Minimize Tomato Stress Factors to Maximize Yields-Part 3 by Ira Gervais, 1-3pm, Galveston County AgriLife Extension in Carbide Park, 4102 Main, La Marque. Free. Galveston County Master Gardener event. Details

www.aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston 

 

Tues., Mar. 24: 50 Ways to Live a Greener Life by Ken Steblein,

 

Fri., Mar. 27: Plant Propagation by Jean Fefer Ph.D., 1-2pm, Thomas A. Glazier Senior Education Center, 16600 Pine Forest Lane. Details: 713-274-3250; www.pct3.hctx.net/senior/glaziersec.aspx 

 

Sat., Mar. 28: Birthday Party for Jerry Seymore (Jerry's Jungle Gardens), 1pm, Baker's Back Yard, 417A Gentry St., Spring. Free. Details: www.bakersbackyard.com 

 

Sat., Mar. 28: Nottingham Country Garden Club Annual Plant Sale, 10am-1pm, Villagio Courtyard, Westheimer Pkwy. @ Peek Rd. Details: nottinghamgardenclub.org; 713-870-5915 or 979-885-6199.  

  

Sat., Mar. 28: Secrets to Spectacular Roses, 10:15am, Cornelius Nursery, 2233 S. Voss. Details: corneliusnurseries.com/events.


Sat., Mar. 28: Memorial Northwest Ladybugs Garden Club Plant and Tree Sale, 9am-2pm, Memorial Northwest Community Center Parking lot, 17440 Theiss Mail Route, Rd., Spring 


Sat., Mar. 28: Roses and Companion Plants by Gaye Hammond, 10am and 2pm, The Enchanted Gardens, 6420 FM 359, Richmond, and Enchanted Forest Nursery, 10611 FM 2759, Richmond. Free. Details: www.myenchanted.com


Sat., Mar. 29: Open Days at Peckerwood Gardens, Hempstead. Garden Conservancy event. Tours 11am & 1pm. $10. Details: peckerwoodgarden.org, 979-826-3232; info@peckerwoodgarden.org 


Tues., Mar. 31: Vegetable Container Gardening by Robert "Skip" Ritcher, 1-2pm, Thomas A. Glazier Senior Education Center, 16600 Pine Forest Lane. Details: 713-274-3250; www.pct3.hctx.net/senior/glaziersec.aspx 

  

Tues., Mar. 31: Tool Care by Tim Jahnke and Henry Harrison III, 6:30-8:30pm, Galveston County AgriLife Extension in Carbide Park, 4102 Main, La Marque. Free. Galveston County Master Gardener event. Details www.aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston


Wed., Apr. 1: Orchid Gardening by John Stubbing, 11am-noon, Thomas A. Glazier Senior Education Center, 16600 Pine Forest Lane. Details: 713-274-3250; www.pct3.hctx.net/senior/glaziersec.aspx 

  

Thurs., April 2: Planting for Bees and Butterflies by Fort Bend Master Gardeners Entomology Group, 9:30 am, Municipal Utility Building, 805 Hidden Canyon Drive, Katy.  Free.  Nottingham Country Garden Club Program. Details: nottinghamgardenclub.org; 713-870-5915.

 

Sat., Apr. 4: Perennials - Best Picks for Texas, 10:15am, Cornelius Nursery, 2233 S. Voss Rd. Free. Details: www.corneliusnurseries.com/events

  

Wed., Apr. 8: Hibiscus gardening by Marti Graves, 2-3pm, Thomas A. Glazier Senior Education Center, 16600 Pine Forest Lane. Details: 713-274-3250; www.pct3.hctx.net/senior/glaziersec.aspx 

  

Thurs., Apr. 9: Basic Irrigation & Rainwater Harvesting by Harris County Master Gardeners. 6:30-8:30pm. Barbara Bush Library, 6817 Cypresswood Dr., Spring. Free. Details: http://harris.agrilife.org/hort. Register 281-855-5600

  

Sat., Apr. 11: White Oak Garden Spring Plant Sale, 9-10am Presentation on featured plants by Heidi Sheesley, 10am-2pm Sale; White Oak Conference Center, 7603 Antoine Dr. Details: www.nnmd.org 

  

Sat., Apr. 11: Open Days at Peckerwood Gardens, Hempstead. Garden Conservancy event. Tours 11am & 1pm. $10. Details: peckerwoodgarden.org, 979-826-3232; info@peckerwoodgarden.org 


Sat., Apr. 11: Plants for Butterfly and Hummingbird Gardens, 10:15am, Cornelius Nursery, 2233 S. Voss Rd. Free. Details: www.corneliusnurseries.com/events 


Thurs., Apr. 16: Harris County Master Gardener Green Thumb Lecture on Basic Irrigation & Rainwater Harvesting. 6:30-8:30pm. Freeman Branch Library, 16616 Diana Lane. Free. Details: http://harris.agrilife.org/hort. Register 281-855-5600

  

Sat., Apr. 18: Basic Irrigation & Rainwater Harvesting by Harris County Master Gardeners. 10am-Noon. Maude Smith Marks Library, 1815 Westgreen Blvd., Katy.  Free. Details: http://harris.agrilife.org/hort. Register 281-855-5600

  

Sat., Apr. 18: Colorful Sun & Shade Plants from Burpee Home Garden, 10:15am, Cornelius Nursery, 2233 S. Voss Rd. Free. Details: www.corneliusnurseries.com/events 


Mon., April 21: What's Blooming in the Lazy Gardener's Garden by Brenda Beust Smith, 10am, Walden on Lake Houston Clubhouse. Lake Houston Ladies Club event. Non-member reservations required: Carol Dandeneau, 832-671-4475 


Tues., Apr. 21: Basic Irrigation & Rainwater Harvesting by Harris County Master Gardeners. 6:30-8:30pm. Spring Branch Memorial Library, 930 Corbindale. Free. Details: http://harris.agrilife.org/hort. Register 281-855-5600

  

Thurs., Apr. 23: Plants of the Bible by Jean Fefer Ph.D., 1-2pm, Thomas A. Glazier Senior Education Center, 16600 Pine Forest Lane. Details: 713-274-3250; www.pct3.hctx.net/senior/glaziersec.aspx 

 

Sat., Apr. 25: Easy Care Flowers, Top Picks from "Proven Winners," 10:15am, Cornelius Nursery, 2233 S. Voss Rd. Free. Details: www.corneliusnurseries.com/events 


Sun., May 10: Open Days at Peckerwood Gardens, Hempstead. Garden Conservancy event. Tours 11am & 1pm. $10. Details: peckerwoodgarden.org, 979-826-3232; info@peckerwoodgarden.org 

 

Tues., May 12: Plumeria Society of America quarterly meet, 7pm, Garden Center, 1500 Hermann Drive in Hermann Park. Details: www.theplumeriasociety.org


Thurs., May 14: Basic Pest Control for Gardeners by Harris County Master Gardeners. 6:30-8:30pm. Barbara Bush Library, 6817 Cypresswood Dr., Spring. Free. Details: http://harris.agrilife.org/hort. Register 281-855-5600

 
Sat., May 16: Basic Pest Control for Gardeners by Harris County Master Gardeners. 10am-Noon. Maude Smith Marks Library, 1815 Westgreen Blvd., Katy.  Free. Details: http://harris.agrilife.org/hort. Register 281-855-5600


Tues., May 19: Basic Pest Control for Gardeners by Harris County Master Gardeners. 6:30-8:30pm. Spring Branch Memorial Library, 930 Corbindale. Free. Details: http://harris.agrilife.org/hort. Register: 281-855-5600


Sun., May 17: Payne's in the Grass Daylily Farm Open Garden, 9am-5pm, 2130 O'Day Road, Pearland.  Free. Details: 281-485-3821, 713-419-6661, paynesinthegrassdaylilyfarm.com 


Sun., May 17: Shimek's Open Gardens, 8am-6pm, 3122 Country Road 237, Alvin. Details: 281-331-4395 or 832-489-4395; www.cityscope.net/~neshimek (under Open Gardens)


Thur., May 21: Basic Pest Control for Gardeners by Harris County Master Gardeners. 6:30-8:30pm. Freeman Branch Library, 16616 Diana Lane. Free. Details: http://harris.agrilife.org/hort. Register 281-855-5600

  

Sat., May 23: Open Days at Peckerwood Gardens, Hempstead. Garden Conservancy event. Tours 11am & 1pm. $10. Details: peckerwoodgarden.org, 979-826-3232; info@peckerwoodgarden.org


Sat., June 13: Plumeria Society of America Sale, 9:30am-3pm, Bay Area Community Center, 5002 NASA Parkway, Seabrook. Details: theplumeriasociety.org


Tues., July 14: Plumeria Society of America quarterly meet, 7pm, Garden Center, 1500 Hermann Drive in Hermann Park. Details: www.theplumeriasociety.org


Sat., July 25: Plumeria Society of America Sale, 9:30am-3pm, Bay Area Community Center, Hermann Park Garden Center, 1500 Hermann Dr. Details: theplumeriasociety.org


Tues., Oct. 13: Plumeria Society of America quarterly meet, 7pm, Garden Center, 1500 Hermann Drive in Hermann Park. Details: www.theplumeriasociety.org

  

 
If we inspire you to attend any of these events, 
please let them know you heard about it in THE LAZY GARDENER & FRIENDS NEWSLETTER!

 

TO SUBMIT EVENTS: Find a similar event in our calendar below and copy the format EXACTLY. 

Then you can add additional information. Email to lazy gardener@sbcglobal.net

Any other formatting will result in a delay in publication. Events will not be picked up from newsletters.


 


 


 


THIS NEWSLETTER IS MADE
POSSIBLE BY THE FOLLOWING SPONSORS






                                             


                                                ABOUT US



 
BRENDA BEUST SMITH
 
WE KNOW HER BEST AS THE LAZY GARDENER . . . 

. . . but Brenda Beust Smith is also:

   * a national award-winning writer & editor
   * a nationally-published writer & photographer 
   * a national horticultural speaker
   * a former Houston Chronicle reporter
   
When the Chronicle discontinued Brenda's 45-year-old Lazy Gardener" print column a couple of years ago, it ranked as the longest-running, continuously-published local newspaper column in the Greater Houston area.

Brenda's gradual sideways step from Chronicle reporter into gardening writing led first to an 18-year series of when-to-do-what Lazy Gardener Calendars, then to her Lazy Gardener's Guide book and now to her Lazy Gardener's Guide on CD (which retails for $20. However, $5 of every sale is returned to the sponsoring group at her speaking engagements).

A Harris County Master Gardener, Brenda has served on the boards of many Greater Houston area horticulture organizations and has hosted local radio and TV shows, most notably a 10+-year Lazy Gardener run on HoustonPBS (Ch. 8) and her call-in "EcoGardening" show on KPFT-FM. 

Brenda recently ended her decades-long stint as Production Manager of the Garden Club of America's BULLETIN magazine. Although still an active horticulture lecturer and broad-based freelance writer,  Brenda's main focus now is  THE LAZY GARDENER & FRIENDS HOUSTON GARDEN NEWSLETTER with John Ferguson and Mark Bowen of Nature's Way Resources.

A native of New Orleans and graduate of St. Agnes Academy and the University of Houston, Brenda lives in Aldine and is married to the now retired Aldine High School Coach Bill Smith. They have one son, Blake.

Regarding this newsletter, Brenda is the lead writer, originator of it and the daily inspiration for it. We so appreciate the way she has made gardening such a fun way to celebrate life together for such a long time.
 
 
JOHN FERGUSON
 
John is a native Houstonian and has over 27 years of business experience. He owns Nature's Way Resources, a composting company that specializes in high quality compost, mulch, and soil mixes. He holds a MS degree in Physics and Geology and is a licensed Soil Scientist in Texas. 
 
John has won many awards in horticulture and environmental issues. He represents the composting industry on the Houston-Galveston Area Council for solid waste. His personal garden has been featured in several horticultural books and "Better Homes and Gardens" magazine. His business has been recognized in the Wall Street Journal for the quality and value of their products. He is a member of the Physics Honor Society and many other professional societies.  John is is the co-author of the book Organic Management for the Professional. 
 
For this newsletter, John contributes articles regularly and is responsible for publishing it.


MARK BOWEN
 
Mark is a native Houstonian, a horticulturist, certified permaculturist and organic specialist with a background in garden design, land restoration and organic project management. He is currently the general manager of Nature's Way Resources. Mark is also the co-author of the book Habitat Gardening for Houston and Southeast Texas, the author of the book Naturalistic Landscaping for the Gulf Coast, co-author of the Bayou Planting Guide and contributing landscape designer for the book Landscaping Homes: Texas. 
 
With respect to this newsletter, Mark serves as a co-editor and article contributor.


PABLO HERNANDEZ
 
Pablo Hernandez is the special projects coordinator for Nature's Way Resources. His realm of responsibilities include: serving as a webmaster, IT support, technical problem solving/troubleshooting, metrics management, quality control, and he is a certified compost facility operator.
 
Pablo helps this newsletter happen from a technical support standpoint. 
 
 
 
 
 
COUPON: Nature's Way Resources. 20% off Herb Soil Mix Mix. http://natureswayresources.com/products.html 
. (Offer good for retail purchases of this product by the cubic yard at Nature's Way Resources (101 Sherbrook Circle, Conroe TX). Expires 03/15/15.
I