October 22, 2014
  
Fall means mulching time in the garden

 

Soil Matters

 

Landscape mulches come in wide arrays of colors and textures. Pine straw is common in some areas, shredded hardwood bark in others. Mulches can even be cocoa hulls or gravel. They help conserve moisture and suppress weeds, but how well they do those jobs, or how often they need to be replenished, varies from mulch to mulch, according to Susan Day, professor at Virginia Tech. And, research is showing that mulches benefit the environment by reducing erosion.

 

David Mitchell, a graduate student working with Day, studied how mulches would affect water runoff and sediment transport. He studied eight different mulch types and their performance. A few results stand out, and research reports are in preparation now with full details.

 

First, all mulches have a huge effect on total suspended solids running off site. Bare soil lost about five times as much sediment as soils with mulches covering them. Thus, mulches help control erosion.

 

Second, geotextiles underneath mulches (such as "landscape fabric" meant to suppress weeds) appeared to accelerate water runoff production in Mitchell's studies.

 

Finally, each mulch wears differently, and absorbs a lot of runoff on its own, independent of the soil beneath it.

 

"Think of mulch as a temporary forest floor," says Day. "It affects the traditional realms of aesthetics, moisture conservation, and elimination of competition for landscape plants. But, it is also an important cog in the machinery of the water cycle by keeping the soil surface receptive to water. This improves water quality by allowing the water to get into the soil, instead of the stormwater control system. Soil is an important part of the water cleansing cycle."

 

The right mulch can:  

  • Suppress weeds
  • Help soil retain moisture
  • Reduce water runoff
  • Reduce erosion of sediments
  • Provide aesthetic value

"Ideally, landscape plantings will fill in and cover the soil surface everywhere, including mulches," says Day. "People are starting to recognize the potential of 'stacked' or 'bundled' ecosystem services and having every piece of nonpaved land in urban areas provide multiple benefits is part of this. Mulch can play a role in making urban landscapes part of our green infrastructure."

 

Day is a professor in the departments of Horticulture and Forest Services/Environmental Conservation at Virginia Tech.

 

This material is excerpted from a blog post on Soils Matter, a public service of the Soil Science Society of America. Soils Matter subjects are written to help the public understand that soil is a precious natural resource, http://soilsmatter.wordpress.com/. SSSA has additional soils information for the public on their www.soils.org/discover-soils website, a website for teachers, www.soils4teachers.org, and for students through 12th grade, www.soils4kids.org.
Planting perennials in the fall

 

Birds & Blooms

 

Why should spring get all the glory? Fall presents a golden opportunity to get outside and plant new perennials. 

 

Not only is it bargain time for many perennials at the garden store, the growing conditions are perfect for establishing roots. The basics of fall planting include:

 

Start Planning: In autumn, the garden's peak is fresh in your mind, so it's easy to remember where you need to add some pizzazz. Remember that dead spot you noticed in midsummer? How about the garden bed that needs a splash of yellow or blue? Now is the time to address those areas.

 

Gardening Basics to Picking up a Bargain: At the end of the season, you can find big discounts on plants that have passed their peak. Expect to find perennials at 50 percent or even 75 percent off.

 

Don't Fret about Frost: Frost might seem like your biggest fall planting challenge, but it's actually not a huge problem and it won't affect the root growth. The roots will grow until the soil freezes solid, which is often weeks or even months after the first frost hits. In temperate regions, soil usually doesn't freeze until after Thanksgiving.

 

Time It Right: In Zones 6 and 7, the cool-down period starts around the end of September, about six weeks before the first fall frost. This is the ideal time to start your fall plants. In Zones 3 to 5, you'll want to plant earlier if you can. And of course, Zones 8 to 11 can pretty much plant year-round without a problem (Lucky!). Still, get an early start to give roots time to get established.

 

Grow the Roots: In spring the soil is cold, so the roots of newly planted perennials grow slowly. Counter-intuitively, the soil is warm in the fall, so roots grow faster. Since the plants aren't producing flowers, they have more energy for sending vigorous roots into the soil of their new home.

 

Give 'Em a Fighting Chance: Once you get your bargain plants home, the first order of business is to give them a thorough drink. Set them in a tray or saucer to catch the water that pours through the potting mix, and let them take their time soaking it up. Then proceed as if they were the healthiest plants in the world. Remember that, even when the soil freezes, those roots are still growing under the ground.

 

Put Them to Bed: Wait until the soil freezes hard, then spread a few inches of mulch around your perennials - not to prevent the soil from freezing, but to keep it from thawing. Roots that aren't solidly anchored can "frost heave" out of the soil when the ground freezes and thaws, putting the plant in danger of getting killed by cold. Once mulch is on, you're all set.

 

Remember, fall planting gives you a big jump on spring gardening, so you have more time in the busy season. 

EPA's WaterSense Program recognizes Texas A&M AgriLife Center for national excellence in education

 

EPA

 

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced its 2014 WaterSense Partners of the Year for their commitment to promoting water efficiency and strengthening the resilience of communities across the country. The Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center in Dallas was also recognized for excellence in outreach and education.

 

The center was awarded for their efforts to advance and promote the WaterSense program and water efficiency. Among Texas A&M AgriLife's achievements include transforming an on-campus home to demonstrate the benefits of indoor and outdoor water savings, holding classes and trainings for landscape and irrigation professionals, participating in regional outreach events, and even touring across Texas with an 8' x 12' model WaterSense labelled home.

 

The award winners' efforts, along with those of more than 1,500 other WaterSense partners, have helped Americans save 757 billion gallons of water and $14.2 billion in water and energy bills since 2006.

 

WaterSense, a partnership program led by EPA, seeks to protect the future of our nation's water supply by offering people a simple way to use less water with water-efficient products, homes, and services.

 

"EPA is pleased to honor this impressive group of WaterSense program leaders", said Ken Kopocis, Deputy Assistant Administrator in EPA's Office of Water. "Their efforts to build strong, resilient water systems are helping communities nationwide meet challenges of extreme storms, drought, and other effects of our changing climate."

 

EPA announced the 2014 Partners of the Year during a WaterSense awards ceremony at the WaterSmart Innovations Conference in Las Vegas, Nevada. The Alliance for Water Efficiency and the Southern Nevada Water Authority cosponsored the ceremony, which recognized organizations for their efforts in 2013.

 

2014 Sustained Excellence Award Winner: Kohler Co. received the highest level of WaterSense recognition for the second year in a row for continuing to implement new, innovative technologies. One example is a dual-flush trip lever for tank-type toilets that makes selecting a smaller flush easier for those with dexterity challenges. Kohler also promoted WaterSense labeled products in 2013 with its cross-country "Trust the Flush" bus tour to showcase WaterSense labeled toilets' proven performance at more than 185 events.

 

2014 Partners of the Year: Promotional Partner of the Year: Cobb County (Ga.) Water System's robust rebate program for WaterSense labeled toilets contributed to a decrease in the county's annual average daily water use by 10 million gallons per day compared to 2010. This is the third WaterSense Promotional Partner of the Year award for Cobb County, which also promoted WaterSense campaigns in its Water $aver quarterly e-newsletter and via Twitter with the #fixaleak and #showerbetter hashtags.

 

Promotional Partner of the Year: Colorado Springs (Colo.) Utilities earned its second WaterSense Promotional Partner of the Year award by hosting more than 20,000 visitors in its Conservation and Environmental Center. The center displayed WaterSense labeled products, a water savings comparison between labeled products and less efficient fixtures, and facts about the water, energy and cost savings achieved with WaterSense labeled products.

 

Manufacturer Partner of the Year: Delta Faucet Company, a three-time Manufacturer Partner of the Year, created an online faucet video gallery and website that featured WaterSense labeled products in more than 20 videos, collectively receiving more than 38,000 views.

 

Manufacturer Partner of the Year: HydroPoint Data Systems helped customers sustain their water savings in 2013 with the release of a Water Budget Manager tool that allows users to see, track and report a landscape's water consumption and water bills after installing WaterSense labeled irrigation controllers.

 

Retailer Partner of the Year: The Home Depot was recognized by EPA for the third time for its strong efforts to support rebate programs across the country for WaterSense labeled toilets, showerheads and irrigation controllers, helping consumers achieve more than $36 million in product markdowns.

 

Builder Partner of the Year: KB Home won its fourth consecutive WaterSense Builder Partner of the Year award and broke new ground in 2013 with the introduction of its Double ZeroHouse 2.0 concept to increase water efficiency and other resource savings.

 

Professional Certifying Organization Partner of Year: The Irrigation Association received its second award for its efforts to educate irrigation professionals and contractors about WaterSense and cross-promote WaterSense's Sprinkler Spruce-Up alongside its Smart Irrigation Month campaign.

 

Professional Certifying Organization Partner of Year: Sonoma-Marin (Calif.) Saving Water Partnership worked with other professional certifying organizations to collectively certify nearly 200 irrigation professionals as part of its WaterSense labeled certification program in 2013, bringing the total number of certified professionals to 837.

 

Licensed Certification Provider Partner of the Year: Energy Inspectors Corporation inspected 51 WaterSense labeled new homes in 2013 and collaborated with KB Home to educate homeowners about the water- and energy-saving benefits of WaterSense labeled models.

 

Six Excellence Awards were also given to partners for their efforts in specific program areas:

  • Athens-Clarke County (Ga.) Public Utilities Department, San Francisco Public Utilities Commission, and Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center in Dallas for Excellence in Outreach and Education
  • Denver Water for Excellence in Strategic Collaboration
  • Puget Sound Energy (Wash.) for Excellence in Promoting WaterSense labeled Products

Learn more about the 2014 Sustained Excellence Award winner, WaterSense Partners of the Year, and Excellence Award winners at www.epa.gov/watersense.

Gardening tips

Tom Harris suggests the following for wooden-handled tools such as shovels, hoes, rakes, and pruners: "Sand off any rough spots on the wood with 150-180 grit sandpaper. Give them a coat of boiled linseed oil. Apply a liberal coating, wait 15 minutes and then wipe off any excess. Be sure to use boiled linseed oil; raw linseed oil takes forever to dry. Do this every fall and you'll probably never have to replace a wooden handle." 

 

Have a favorite gardening tip you'd like to share? Texas Gardener's Seeds is seeking brief gardening tips from Texas gardeners to use in future issues. If we publish your tip in Seeds, we will send you a free Texas Gardener 2015 Planning Guide & Calendar. Please send your tips of 50 words or less to the editor at: Gardening Tips.

Upcoming garden events
 
If you would like your organization's events included in "Upcoming Garden Events" or would like to make a change to a listed event, please contact us at Garden Events. To ensure inclusion in this column, please provide complete details at least three weeks prior to the event.
OCTOBER

 

San Antonio: Celebrate National Food Day with Green Spaces Alliance and area community gardeners from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Friday, October 24 at Beacon Hill Community Garden, 1144 W. Gramercy Place, San Antonio. This evening event will be open to the public and recommended for both families and friends of all ages. The event includes kids' activities, a potluck, garden tours and tips, and screening of the film "Fed Up! "The event is free (donations invited) but Green Spaces asks that you bring a healthy food item to share at the potluck and chair or blanket for movie viewing. Register in advance. For additional information, visit www.greensatx.org/upcoming-events .

 

Bryan: Brazos County Master Gardeners 2014 Town and Country Garden Tour, Saturday, October 25, from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. Tickets are $15 per person and allow visitors into all six garden gardens. Tickets go on sale September 25 at the Brazos County Extension Office, 2619 Highway 21 West, Bryan. Checks only will be accepted at this location. 979/823-0129. Tickets On Site: On the day of the tour at any of the garden sites and checks or cash only are accepted. For more information, visit www.brazosmg.com or email brazosmg@brazosmg.com.

 

Fort Worth: Hortipalooza, a festival of fun, friends and horticultural enlightenment, and family day devoted to all things gardening, will be held Saturday, October 25, at the Resource Connection, Building 2300, 2300 Circle Drive, Fort Worth. The Resource Connection is located off Campus Drive, across from the Tarrant County College - South Campus. Sponsored by Texas A&M AgriLife Extension, doors open at 8:30 a.m. and feature storytellers, vendors and talks on 20 Must Have Plants, Gardens in a Drought, Creating Herbal Combo Containers, Propagation Magic, Maple Madness and Success with Seeds, as well as hands-on classes on Papercrete Pots (beginner and advanced), Copper Rain Chains and Concrete Leaves. The event will end around 4:30 p.m. Speakers include area Master Gardeners, the Herb 'n' Cowgirl Ann McCormick, Steve Rosenbaum of Steve's Leaves, Tucker Reed, horticulture manager at Dallas Arboretum and Botanic Garden and Steve Chamblee, chief horticulturalist at Chandor Gardens in Weatherford. Lee Coats, the Papercrete Potter from Missouri, will be teaching the papercrete container classes. Papercrete is made with portland cement, perlite and paper. Registration fee if purchased before the event is adults, $25; couples, $45; and children under 16, $15 which includes lunch, snacks and the talks. Fee the day of the event is adults, $35 and kids under 16, $15. There is an extra fee for the hands-on classes. Complete information on the schedule and registration is at www.tarrantmg.org.

 

Sugar Land: "Conserving Water in the Landscape" Saturday, Oct. 25, 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the T.E. Harman Center, 226 Matlage Way, Sugar Land. Learn about plant selection and planning to maximize a landscape's beauty while reducing water use, water efficiency practices, tips on managing irrigation systems and harvesting rainwater for outdoor use. The $25 registration fee incudes a rain barrel kit. Jointly presented by the City of Sugar Land, the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service-Fort Bend County and the Fort Bend Master Gardeners. To download a registration form, visit www.fbmg.com, or call 281-341-7068.

 

Austin: Green Corn Project's 16th Annual Fall Festival, Grow Locally, Cook Globally, is October 26, 2013 from noon-4 p.m. Tickets are $35.00 in advance, $40 at the gate, and ticket sales will end at 3 p.m. that afternoon. The Fall Festival will be at Boggy Creek Farm, 3414 Lyons Road, Austin, and will feature many of Austin's best restaurants, live music on the front porch, cooking demonstrations on the back porch, and a silent auction.    

 

Bryan: Dwight Bohlmeyer, Program Manager for the Salter Farm Education Research,Institute for Quantum Physics & Engineering at Texas A&M University, will present "Fall Wildflowers of the Salter Research Farm" Tuesday, October 28, 7-8 p.m. at Brazos Center, 3232 Briarcrest Drive, Room 102. Bryan. This program features the habitats, flora and fauna of the Salter Research Farm in Robertson County, Texas.  Biodiversity surveys are being conducted at this historical property and those results will be discussed with an emphasis on fall blooming wildflowers. For additional information, visit brazosmg.com.

 

Humble: The 3rd Annual Sustainable Landscape Conference will be held Friday, October 31, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. at the Mercer Arboretum & Botanic Gardens, 22306 Aldine Westfield Road, Humble. Learn from industry leaders about sustainable parking design and development during this year's conference at Big Stone Lodge at Dennis Johnston Park. For additional information or to make reservations, call Mercer Botanic Gardens at 281-443-8731.

NOVEMBER

Dallas: A Fall Plant Sale and Garden Safari will be held from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m., Saturday, November 1, at Texas Discovery Gardens at Fair Park, 3601 Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd., Dallas. Enjoy native and adapted plants that are rare to find in local nurseries. Arrive at hor early, at 9 a.m., for a guided plant sale safari, and learn what plants are on sale. The tour is $10, $5 for members. Register in advance. For additional information, visit http://texasdiscoverygardens.org/events_and_classes.php.

Rosenberg: Saturday with the Master Gardeners - "Fall Vegetable Gardening" Saturday, November 1, 10 a.m. in the Vegetable Garden. Learn about the crops that can be grown in the fall in a talk presented by Fort Bend Master Gardeners Vegetable Specialists. Visit the Demonstration Gardens before or after the Garden Talk while Master Gardeners are working in the gardens and available to answer questions. Join us at the Agriculture Center at 1402 Band Road, Rosenberg. Call 281-341-7068 or visit www.fbmg.com  for more information.

 

San Antonio: San Antonio Garden Center Clubs will meet Wednesday, November 5 at 10 a.m. at 3310 N. New Braunfels @ Funston. Program will feature John R. Thomas, owner and founder of Wildseed Farms, the nationally-known wildflower farm and nursery in Fredericksburg.He will share the story of Wildseed's success and offer tips on planting and growing wildflowers in your own yard. Coffee at 9:30. Free and open to the public. For more information, visit http://www.sanantoniogardencenter.org/ or call 210-824-9981.

 

Round Rock: The Round Rock Public Library, 216 E. Main St., Round Rock, presents "The Best Trees for the Texas Landscape," from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 6. One of the most valuable plants of the urban landscape, trees add value, create shade, impart seasonal beauty and provide a habitat for our native wildlife. Join a discussion of how to select, plant and care for the best tree choices for Central Texas. The program will be conducted by Jeff Ferris, a gardener in Austin for more than 25 years, staff horticulturist and diagnostician at The Natural Gardener, certified Permaculturist, and instructor in the ACC Landscape and Horticulture program since 2008. Through Neighborhood Harvest Project, he co-founded the first public community garden in Round Rock - Unity Park Community Garden. Jeff is a frequent guest and occasional host of "John Dromgoole's Gardening Naturally" program on KLBJ radio, the longest running organic gardening show in the country. For more information, please contact Julie Chapa, 512-218-7014.

 

Seguin: The Guadalupe County Master Gardeners present their brown bag luncheon at the Seguin Public Library, 707 E. College, Seguin, on Friday, November 7, from noon to 1:30 p.m. featuring Nancy Masterson, Master Gardener and member of the Guadalupe Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas. She will be recommending plants with outstanding blooms and berries for Seguin. This program about native plants will provide free handouts.According to Nancy Masterson, "The program is NICE: Natives Instead of Common Exotics. Learn how to save money, save water and save the natural legacy of our beautiful state. Fall is a great time to add new plants to the landscape and some native plants put on their best show in autumn. Admission is free and feel free to bring your lunch.

 

Hempstead: Peckerwood Garden, 20559 FM 359 Rd, Hempstead, offers Fall 2014 Open Weekends, November 8 and 9 - First tour 10 a.m., Second tour 1 p.m.., Plant sale hours 10-3 p.m.., and November 22 and 23 - First tour 10 a.m., Second tour 1 p.m.., Plant sale hours 10-3 pm. Tour admission is $10 per person, members free. No advanced reservation required. Pay at the gate (cash, check, credit cards). Students (12 and older) admitted free to the garden. Unfortunately, small children, baby strollers, and pets are not allowed in the garden due to the delicate and sharp plants. We also offer private tours of the garden." Visit www.peckerwoodgarden.org for more information.  

 

Rosenberg: Saturday, November 8 - "Jams & Jellies," presented by Anne Ondrusek, Owner, Honeys Homemade Jams & Jellies, for the Fort Bend Master Gardeners' "Backyard Basics" series. Demonstration included. 9 a.m. Agriculture Center, 1402 Band Rd, Rosenberg. $15 ($25 couple). Details: Call 281-342-3034 or visit www.fbmg.com.

 

Humble: Herb Gardening for Home Use will be presented Wednesday, November 12, noon-2 p.m. at the Mercer Arboretum & Botanic Gardens, 22306 Aldine Westfield Road, Humble. Join Marilyn O'Conner, "The Herb Lady," to learn about the wide variety of herbs and their uses in homes and gardens. For additional information or to make reservations, call Mercer Botanic Gardens at 281-443-8731.

 

San Antonio: Join Green Spaces Alliance for lessons in Saving Water and Growing More Food. It can be done in concert and they will demonstrate how from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. on Saturday, November 15 at Terrell Heights Community Garden, triangle at 120 Larchmont, San Antonio 78209. This workshop is open to the public. Tickets are $10 for members and $20 non-members to attend the workshop or $50 members and $60 non-members for workshop and a prepared rainbarrel to take home. Register in advance; rainbarrels will only be supplied for attendees prepaying for item. For additional information, visit http://www.greensatx.org/upcoming-events/register-for-a-workshop .

 

San Antonio: Numa Laiche and Jamie Daily will discuss Heritage, Heirloom and Passalong Plants at the November 20 meeting of the Bexar County Master Gardeners. The meeting begins with a social at 6 p.m., followed by the 6 p.m.-8 p.m. presentation, at Colonies House Meeting Room, 3511 Colony Dr., San Antonio. For additional information, call 210-467-6575. 

DECEMBER

 

Round Rock: The Round Rock Public Library, 216 E. Main St., Round Rock, presents "Seed Starting for Those with a Brown Thumb," from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m., Thursday, Dec. 4. Many people are intimidated by the thought of having to start their own seeds for the garden or the landscape. Learn why starting your own seeds is easier, less costly and provides you with a wider choice of plants. The program will be conducted by Jeff Ferris, a gardener in Austin for more than 25 years, staff horticulturist and diagnostician at The Natural Gardener, certified Permaculturist, and instructor in the ACC Landscape and Horticulture program since 2008. Through Neighborhood Harvest Project, he co-founded the first public community garden in Round Rock - Unity Park Community Garden. Jeff is a frequent guest and occasional host of "John Dromgoole's Gardening Naturally" program on KLBJ radio, the longest running organic gardening show in the country. For more information, please contact Julie Chapa, 512-218-7014.  

 

Bryan: Future use of water and its impact on agriculture will be the focus of the 2014 Texas Plant Protection Association conference scheduled Dec. 10-11 at the Brazos Center, 3232 Briarcrest Drive, Bryan. Dr. Travis Miller, interim director for state operations with the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service, will be one of the featured speakers during the opening general session Dec. 10. Dr. John Nielsen-Gammon, Texas state climatologist, and Carlos Rubinstein, chairman of the Texas Water Development Board, will also be general session featured speakers. Nielsen-Gammon will discuss climate variability and Rubinstein will give a Texas water outlook. Other presentations during the general session will focus on water conservation, comparative irrigation methods, agricultural innovations from industry in dealing with climate change, and a Texas farmer's perspective on dealing with water management. Afternoon sessions on Dec. 10 will include a look at the Texas drought's impact on wildlife, unmanned aerial vehicles in agriculture, and decision and precision applications of nitrogen. The second day of the conference will feature sessions on grain, cotton, horticulture/turf, and pasture and rangeland. A student poster contest will be held as well as an awards luncheon. For registration information, visit http://bit.ly/ZwpjOD.

 

Humble: Succulentarriums will be presented Wednesday, December 10, noon-2 p.m.

at the Mercer Arboretum & Botanic Gardens, 22306 Aldine Westfield Road, Humble.

Learn how to combine remarkable succulents, moss, and cacti with recycled glassware to create fun and fanciful display items for your home or office. These unique items also make great holiday gifts! For additional information or to make reservations, call Mercer Botanic Gardens at 281-443-8731.

MARCH 2015

Quitman: Wood County Master Gardeners will host a Spring Conference, "Time to Plant Smarter," 8 a.m.-noon, Saturday, March 28, at the Quitman High School. Vendors, speakers and mini garden-related demonstrations. For more information, contact Gloria Jean Rosewall at gloriajeanrosewall@gmail.com or Roy Culbertson at royculb@gmail.com.
Monthly meetings

 

If you would like your organization's events included in "Monthly Meetings" or would like to make a change to a listed meeting, please contact us at Monthly Meetings. To ensure inclusion in this column, please provide complete details. 

 

FIRST WEEK

 

Kaufman: The Kaufman County Master Gardeners meet the first Monday of each month at the First Community Church at 1401 Trinity Drive in Crandall. January through April and August and September meetings are at 9 a.m., with the remaining meetings beginning at 7 p.m. For additional information visit http://www.kcmga.org, call 972-932-9069 or email to sbburden@ag.tamu.edu.


Houston: The Harris County Master Gardeners meet at noon the first Tuesday of each month at the Texas AgriLife Extension, 3033 Bear Creek Drive (near the intersection of Highway 6 and Patterson Road), Houston. For additional information visit http://hcmga.tamu.edu
or call 281-855-5600.

 

Midland: The Permian Basin Master Gardeners meet at noon, the first Wednesday of each month at the Permian Basin Readiness Center at the Midland International Airport. For more information, call 432-498-4071.

  

Allen: The Allen Garden Club meets at 7 p.m. on the first Thursday of each month, February through December, at the Allen Heritage Center, 100 E. Main St., Allen. For more information, visit www.allengardenclub.org.

 

Brownwood: The Brown County Master Gardeners Association meets the first Thursday of each month from noon to 1 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 605 Fisk Ave., Brownwood. For further information, call Mary Green Engle at 325-784-8453.

 

Gonzalas: Gonzales Master Gardeners hold their monthly meeting at noon on the first Thursday of each month at 623 Fair Street, Gonzales. Bring a bag lunch, drinks provided. Contact AgriLife Extension Office at 830-672-8531 or visit http://gonzalesmastergardeners.org for more information.

New Braunfels: The Comal Garden Club meets the first Thursday of each month at 9:30 a.m. at Southbank Clubhouse, 222 Southbank Blvd., New Braunfels. 

 

SECOND WEEK

 

Austin: Austin Organic Gardeners Club meets at 6:30 p.m. on the second Monday of each month (except December) at the Austin Area Garden Center, 2220 Barton Springs Road, Zilker Botanical Gardens in Austin. For more information, visit www.austinorganicgardeners.org.

 

Marion: The Guadalupe County (Schertz/Seguin) Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets on the second Tuesday of each month except July, August and December at St. John's Lutheran Church in Marion. Directions to St. John's Lutheran Church: From FM 78 turn south onto FM 465 and the church is just past the Marion School on the right. From IH-10 go north on FM 465 towards Marion. The Church will be on the left, just before you get to town. A plant exchange and meet-and-greet begins at 6:30 p.m. followed by the program at 7 p.m. Visitors are welcome. For more information or an application to join NPSOT visit www.npsot.org/GuadalupeCounty/ or contact guadalupecounty@npsot.org.

 

Quitman: The Quitman Garden Club meets at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month at the Quitman Library on E Goode Street, Quitman. It is a diverse group that welcomes all visitors. For more information, e-mail quitmangardenclub@gmail.com.

 

Denton: The Denton County Master Gardener Association meets from 9:30 a.m. until 11 a.m. the

second Wednesday of each month at 401 W. Hickory St., Denton. Meetings are open to the public. More information is available at: http://dcmga.com/.

 

Humble: The Mercer Arboretum & Botanic Garden, 22306 Aldine Westfield Road, Humble, hosts a Lunch Bunch the second Wednesday of each month from noon until 2 p.m. Take a sack lunch or order a box lunch from Starbucks when you call 281-443-8731 to reserve your spot. Master Gardeners and Masters Naturalists may earn CEU credits by attending.

 

Jacksboro: The Jacksboro Garden Club meets at 9:30 a.m. the second Wednesday of each month (except June, July and August) at the Concerned Citizens Center, 400 East Pine Street, Jacksboro. For more information, call Melinda at 940-567-6218.

 

Longview: The Gregg County Master Gardeners Association meets the second Wednesday of each month from noon to 1 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 405 E. Marshall Ave., Longview. The public is invited to attend. There is an educational program preceding the business meeting. For further information call Cindy Gill at 903-236-8429 or visit www.gregg-tx.tamu.edu.

 

Rockport: The Rockport Herb & Rose Study Group, founded in March 2003, meets the

second Wednesday of each month at 10 a.m. at 619 N. Live Oak Street, Room 14, Rockport, to discuss all aspects of using and growing herbs, including historical uses and tips for successful propagation and cultivation. Sometimes they take field trips and have cooking demonstrations in different locations. For more information, contact Linda 361-729-6037, Ruth 361-729-8923 or Cindy 979-562-2153 or visit www.rockportherbs.org and http://rockportherbies.blogspot.com.

 

Woodway: The McLennan County Master Gardeners meet on the second Wednesday each month at noon at the Carleen Bright Arboretum, 9001 Bosque Blvd., Woodway. Educational programs follow the business session. For more information, call 254-757-5180.

 

Beaumont: The Jefferson County Master Gardeners meet at 7 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the AgriLife Extension Office, 1225 Pearl Street, Suite 200, Beaumont. For more information, call 409-835-8461.

 

Georgetown: The Williamson County Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the Georgetown Public Library, 402 W. 8th Street. Georgetown. For additional information, contract Billye Adams at 512-863-9636 or visit http://www.npsot.org/WilliamsonCounty/default.htm.

 

Orange: The Orange County Master Gardeners Association holds their monthly meeting on the

second Thursday of each month. A short program is presented. The meeting starts at 6:30 p.m. at the new Orange County Expo Center on Hwy 1442 in Orangefield. Enter the building in the front entrance, first door on the right, Texas AgriLife offices. Pot luck supper at 6 p.m. Visit http://txmg.org/orange for more information.

 

San Antonio: The San Antonio Herb Society meets at 7 p.m. on the second Thursday of each month at the San Antonio Garden Center, 3310 N. New Braunfels (corner of Funston & N. New Braunfels). For more information on programs, visit www.sanantonioherbs.org.

Smithville: The Smithville Community Gardens meets at 5:30 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the Smithville Recreation Center. 

 

Angleton: The Brazoria County Master Gardeners meet at 11 a.m. on the second Friday of each month at the Brazoria County Extension Office, 21017 County Road 171, Angleton. There is a general business meeting followed by a brief educational program each month. For further information call 979-864-1558, ext.110.

 

College Station: The A&M Garden Club meets on the second Friday of each month during the school year at 9:30 a.m. in the training room of the College Station Waste Water Facility building at the end of North Forest Parkway, College Station. Expert speakers, plant sharing, and federated club projects help members learn about gardening in the Brazos Valley, floral design, conservation, and more. For more information, visit http://www.amgardenclub.com/.

 

Houston: The Spring Branch African Violet Club meets the second Saturday of each month, January through November, at 10:30am at the Copperfield Baptist Church, 8350 Highway 6 North, Houston. Call Karla at 281-748-8417 prior to attending to confirm meeting date and time.

  

Kilgore: Northeast Texas Organic Gardeners meets at 1:30 p.m. on the second Saturday of each month. For more information, call Carole Ramke at 903-986-9475.

 

Dallas: The Rainbow Garden Club of North Texas meets the second Sunday of each month at 2 p.m. Everyone is welcome. Meetings are held at member's homes and garden centers around the area. For more information, visit www.RainbowGardenClub.com.

 

THIRD WEEK

 

Arlington: The Arlington Men's Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the third Monday of each month (except December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact Lance Jepson at LJepson@aol.com.

 

Cleburne:The Johnson County Master Gardener's meet on the third Monday of each month at McGregor House, 1628 W Henderson, Cleburne. Meeting times are at 2 p.m. October through April, except December and at 6 p.m. May through September. An educational program precedes the business meeting. For additional information, contact Sue Matern at 817-517-9076.

  

New Braunfels: The Comal Master Gardeners meet at 6 p.m. the third Monday of each month (except April and December,) at the GVTC Auditorium, 36101 FM 3159, New Braunfels. An educational program precedes the business meeting. The public is invited to attend. For additional information, call 830-620-3440 or visit http://txmg.org/comal/.

 

Corpus Christi: The Nueces Master Gardeners meet at noon the third Tuesday of each month, except December, at Garden Senior Center, 5325 Greely Dr., Corpus Christi. An educational program precedes the business meeting. For further information call 361 767-5217.

 

Evant: The Evant Garden Club meets on the third Tuesday of each month at 10 a.m., usually at the bank in downtown Evant. To confirm the date, time and place of each month's meeting, call 254-471-5860.  

 

Rockport: Monthly meetings of the Aransas/San Patricio Master Gardeners are held at 10 a.m. on the third Tuesday of each month at Texas AgriLife Extension Service - Aransas County Office, 892 Airport Rd., Rockport. For additional information, e-mail aransas-tx@tamu.edu or call 361-790-0103.

 

Sugar Land: The Sugar Land Garden Club meets on the third Tuesday of each month, September through November and January through April at 10 a.m. at the Sugar Land Community Center, 226 Matlage Way, Sugar Land. The club hosts a different speaker each month. For more information, visit www.sugarlandgardenclub.org.

 

Denton: The Denton Organic Society, a group devoted to sharing information and educating the public regarding organic principles, meets the third Wednesday of each month (except July, August and December) at the Denton Senior Center, 509 N. Bell Avenue. Meetings are free and open to the public. Meetings begin at 7 p.m. and are preceded by a social at 6:30. For more information, call 940-382-8551.

 

Glen Rose: The Somervell County Master Gardeners meet at 10 a.m., the third Wednesday of each month at the Somervell County AgriLife Extension office, 1405 Texas Drive, Glen Rose. Visitors are welcome. For more information, call 254-897-2809 or visit www.somervellmastergardeners.org.

 

Granbury: The Lake Granbury Master Gardeners meet at 1 p.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at the Hood County Annex 1, 1410 West Pearl Street, Granbury. The public is invited to attend. There is an educational program each month preceding the business meeting. For information on topics call 817-579-3280 or visit http://www.hoodcountymastergardeners.org/.

 

Seabrook: The Harris County Precinct 2 Master Gardeners hold an educational program at 10 a.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at The Meeting Room at Clear Lake Park (on the Lakeside), 5001 NASA Road 1, Seabrook. The programs are free and open to the public. For more information, visit http://hcmgap2.tamu.edu.

 

Brownwood: Brownwood Garden Club meets the third Thursday of each month, 11:30 a.m.- 1 p.m.  The club meetings are at Southside Baptist Church, 1219 Indian Creek Road, with refreshments and a speaker presentation. Visitors are welcome. For more information, email boeblingen@centex.net or call 817-454-8175.

 

Houston: The Native Plant Society of Texas - Houston (NPSOT-H) meets at 7:30 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month except for October (4th Thursday) and December (2nd Thursday). Location varies. For locations, for more information on programs, and for information about native plants for Houston, visit http://www.npsot.org/Houston.

 

Seguin: The Guadalupe County Master Gardeners meets at 6:30 p.m. the third Thursday of each month, at the Justice Center, 211 Court Street, Seguin. After a brief social hour, the meeting and guest speaker begins at 7 p.m. The meeting is free and open to the public. For additional information, call 830-303-3889 or visit www.guadalupecountymastergardeners.org.

 

FOURTH WEEK

 

Brackenridge Park: The Native Plant Society San Antonio Chapter meets every fourth Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. in the Lions Field Adult and Senior Center, 2809 Broadway at E. Mulberry, Brackenridge Park, except August and December. Social and seed/plant exchange at 6:30 p.m. Free and open to the public. For more information, contact Bea at 210-999-7292 or visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio.

 

Bryan: The Brazos County Master Gardeners, a program of Texas AgriLife Extension, meet the fourth Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m. at the Brazos Center, 3232 Briarcrest Drive, Bryan. There is a public gardening program at each meeting and pertinent information may be found at brazosmg.com or 979-823-0129.

 

Edna: The Jackson County Master Gardeners present their "Come Grown With Us" seminars on the fourth Tuesday of each month, January through October, beginning at 7 p.m. at 411 N. Wells, Edna. The seminars are free, open to the public and offer 2 CEU hours to Master Gardeners or others requiring them. For additional information, contact the Jackson County Extension Office at 361-782-3312.

 

Linden: The Caddo Wildflower Chapter of Native Plants Society meets the fourth Tuesday of each month at the senior citizens building at 507 S Kaufman St. in Linden at 6:30. Visitors are welcome. For additional information, contact Karen Tromza at khtromza@yahoo.com.

 

Fort Worth: The Organic Garden Club of Forth Worth meets at 7 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday of each month except July and December at the Deborah Beggs Moncrief Garden Center, 3220 Botanic Blvd., Ft. Worth. Refreshments are served. For more information, call 817-263-9322 or visit www.ogcfw.webs.com.

 

San Antonio: The Native Plant Society of Texas San Antonio Chapter meets the fourth Tuesday of each month, except August and December, at the Lions Field Adult & Senior Center, 2809 Broadway, San Antonio. Social and plant/seed exchange at 6:30 p.m., program at 7:00 p.m. For more information, visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio or email npsot.sanantonio@gmail.com.

 

Houston: The Houston Chapter of the Native Prairie Association of Texas (HNPAT) meets from 7 p.m. until 8:30 p.m. the fourth Thursday of each month at 3015 Richmond Ave., Houston. For more information, contact hnpat@prairies.org.

 

Leander: The Leander Garden Club meets on the fourth Thursday of each month (except July and August) at 10:30 a.m. at the community room behind the Greater Texas Federal Credit Union,1300 N. Bell, Cedar Park, unless there is special event planned. Following a program and short business meeting, we share a pot-luck luncheon. To confirm the meeting place and time, please call president Cathy Clark-Ramsey at 512-963-4698 or email info@leandergc.org.

 

Dallas: The Dallas County Master Gardeners meet the fourth Thursday of each month at 11:30 a.m. For location and program information, visit http://www.dallascountymastergardeners.org/ or contact The Helpdesk, M-F, 8 to 4:30 214-904-3053.

 

Dallas: The Greater Dallas Organic Garden Club meets at 7:00 p.m. on the fourth Thursday of each month at the REI, 4515 LBJ Freeway, Dallas. For more information, call 214-824-2448 or visit www.gdogc.org.

  

Arlington: The Arlington Organic Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the last Thursday of each month (except November and December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact David at 817-483-7746.

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Publisher: Chris S. Corby ● Editor: Michael Bracken 

 

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