April 30, 2014
  

Don't let summer droughts stop you from gardening 

 

By Melinda Myers

Gardening expert, TV/radio host & columnist

  

No matter where you live, being a waterwise gardener makes environmental and economic sense. And it's really easier than you think.

 

Here are just a few of the easy and affordable ways to conserve water while growing a beautiful garden.

 

Grow plants suited to your climate, and this includes the average rainfall for your area. Select drought-tolerant plants, that once established, require less on-going care. Consider native plants like coneflower, yucca and penstemon as well as native and non-invasive ornamental grasses.

 

Be sure to group moisture-loving plants together and near a source of water. You'll save time and water by concentrating your efforts on fewer plants. Move containers to the shade or provide additional shade during hot dry weather to reduce the plant's water needs.

 

Use organic nitrogen fertilizer. This slow release fertilizer encourages slow steady growth that requires less water. Plus, it will not burn plants during hot dry weather. It simply stays in the soil until the growing conditions, moisture and temperature are right for the plants.

 

Install a rain barrel or two to capture rain for watering in-ground and container gardens. Or place a rain barrel near your garden and collect rain directly from the sky. Use this water to supplement your garden's moisture needs during drought.

 

Decorate or mask the barrels with vines, decorative fencing, containers, or nearby plantings. And check with your local municipality as several states and communities have banned rain harvesting on private property.

 

Use soaker hoses and drip irrigation to save water by applying the water directly to the soil where it is needed. Consider connecting your rain barrel to a soaker hose in a nearby garden. Just open the spigot and allow gravity to slowly empty the water throughout the day. Check to make sure water is evenly distributed throughout the garden.

 

And always water thoroughly and less frequently to encourage deep drought tolerant roots. Add a layer of organic mulch like shredded leaves, evergreen needles or herbicide-free grass clippings to conserve moisture and keep roots cool. As these break down they add organic matter to the soil improving the water holding ability of sandy and rocky soils.

 

Allow lawns to go dormant during droughts. Apply 1/4-inch of water every three to four weeks during extended droughts. This keeps the crown of the plant alive while the grass remains dormant. Do not apply weed killers and minimize foot and equipment traffic on dormant lawns.

 

Incorporate one or more of these techniques to your garden care this season. You'll conserve water while creating healthier and more attractive gardens.

 

Gardening expert, TV/radio host, author & columnist Melinda Myers has more than 30 years of horticulture experience and has written more than 20 gardening books, including Can't Miss Small Space Gardening and the Midwest Gardener's Handbook. She hosts The Great Courses "How to Grow Anything" DVD series and the nationally syndicated Melinda's Garden Moment segments. Myers' web site, www.melindamyers.com, offers gardening videos and tips.

Great veggies for beginning gardeners

 

Park Seed

 

The popularity of fresh, local produce is encouraging many Americans to try their hand at something their great-grandparents did most years of their lives: grow vegetables in the garden! What might surprise their ancestors, however, is that rather than reading books or taking courses to become familiar with the art of vegetable garden, today's young farmers are more likely to seek help from the Internet.

 

"There are so many resources at the disposal of new gardeners today," Park Seed Director of Seed Merchandising Stephanie Turner remarks. "In addition to websites packed with growing information, there are huge networks of experienced gardeners just dying to help you learn. And social media puts the expertise of master gardeners and farmers at your fingertips."

 

As more and more varieties are available as plants compact enough for containers, vegetable gardening is expanding from rural and suburban gardens to urban balconies and front stoops. "Self-watering" containers include a built-in reservoir that keeps plants hydrated for days, making maintenance easier for today's busier gardeners. Hanging pouches and flexible sacks are available for growing strawberries, carrots, blueberries, and even potatoes in very little space. No matter what the space constraints, if a gardener can find sunshine, vegetables can be grown!

 

So what should a new gardener grow first? For at least a few feet of available garden space in the sun, Turner recommends radishes, beans, and squash. "These are among the easiest of all vegetables," she notes, "and they have a high harvest potential." Beans are valuable for another reason: as legumes, they are nitrogen-fixers in the soil. Turner recommends not only growing these easy vines, but also chopping up the plants after the beans have been harvested and working them back into the soil, to create a richer loam for next season.

 

For new gardeners preferring to begin with container varieties, Turner advocates lettuce. It sprouts quickly, and the loose-leaf types such as romaine and arugula can be picked leaf by leaf as needed for salads all season long.

 

And for gardeners seeking beauty as well as nutrition, flowering annuals make splendid companions to all vegetables. Super-easy varieties include zinnia, marigold, and cosmos. These flowers also attract the pollinating bees and butterflies that vegetables need, and add pops of eye-catching color that help remind new gardeners it's time to water the garden or check the harvest!

 

With today's online resources, the availability of a wide array of varieties, and the versatility of new types of containers, growing vegetables at home is easier and more fun than ever before.

Gardening tips

 

As the weather warms up, keep an eye out for sprouting weed seed. Remove them when they are small and easy to dislodge. Weeds respond well to the fertility in your garden and divert moisture and nutrients from your vegetables and ornamentals.


Have a favorite gardening tip you'd like to share? Texas Gardener's Seeds is seeking brief gardening tips from Texas gardeners to use in future issues. If we publish your tip in Seeds, we will send you a free Texas Gardener 2014 Planning Guide & Calendar. Please send your tips of 50 words or less to the editor at: Gardening Tips. 

Upcoming garden events
 
If you would like your organization's events included in "Upcoming Garden Events" or would like to make a change to a listed event, please contact us at Garden Events. To ensure inclusion in this column, please provide complete details at least three weeks prior to the event.
MAY

 

Austin: "Drip Irrigation Systems" will be presented Thursday, May 1, 10 a.m.-noon, at the Travis County East Service Center, 6011 Blue Bluff, Austin. As the heat of summer arrives, your garden will need more water to continue to produce those beautiful flowers and delicious homegrown veggies we all appreciate. Reduce the amount of wasted water in your garden this year with irrigation targeted for your plants' specific needs. Learn how to install an effective water-wise drip irrigation system from Joe Posern, current president of the Travis County Master Gardeners Association. Joe will describe the key factors involved in a system and how to gauge and monitor its efficiency. Register at https://agriliferegister.tamu.edu/TravisCounty or by phone 979-845-2604. $10 fee, $15 at site. When you register, you'll automatically be entered in a drawing for a gift certificate to The Great Outdoors on South Congress. Class is limited to 40 people.

 

Austin: The Inside Austin Gardens tour features six gardens of exemplary quality and design. The tour is presented by Travis County Master Gardeners Association in cooperation with the Travis County AgriLife Extension Service on Saturday, May 3, from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. Tour includes gardens to explore, continuous one-on-one educational offerings, kids' activities, and book sales. Complete tour information can be found at www.InsideAustinGardens.org. Purchase tickets online or at each garden on tour day. Cash, CC accepted at gardens. Further information including addresses, educational topics, maps, kid's activities and ticket prices can be found at www.InsideAustinGardens.org.

  

Humble: Mercer Arboretum & Botanic Gardens, 22306 Aldine Westfield Road, Humble, will host a Garden Party and Auction: Fabulous at Forty. Saturday, May 3, starting at 6 p.m. Enjoy an enchanting evening under the stars while bidding on unique treasures during this annual event. Festivities begin with a silent auction followed by gourmet cuisine, a wine and beer reception, plus live music and dancing. Guests will also delight in live auction items as well as an appearance from the guest of honor, Texas Gardener columnist Greg Grant. Don't miss this opportunity to celebrate Mercer's 40th anniversary and recognize the legacy of Charles and Thelma Mercer. Proceeds benefit special garden projects and programs at Mercer. Call 281-443-8731 for reservations.

 

Kerrville: RNC Naturalist Susan Sander will lead "Wicked Family Fun with Bugs," 9 a.m.-10 a.m., May 3, at Riverside Nature Center, 150 Francisco Lemos St., Kerrville. Learn what "bugs" plants by looking for evidence of insects. $10 suggested donation per family ot $5 individual. For additional information, visit www.riversidenaturecenter.org or email naturalist@riversidenaturecenter.org.

Fort Bend: Saturday, May 3, attend Saturday with the Master Gardeners - Presentation on "Drip Irrigation" by Fort Bend Master Gardeners. Improve your understanding of landscape water usage, including calculating costs of excessive water usage and finding sources of irrigation system problems with hands-on demonstrations. Master Gardeners' Demonstration gardens open for tours and Master Gardeners available for tips and advice, 8:30-11 am. Park in front of the Agriculture Center located at 1402 Band Road in Rosenberg and take one of the sidewalks back to the area behind the building. Call 281-341-7068 or visit http://www.fbmg.com/ for more information. 


Austin: Children and families will bloom outside this spring as the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center unveils its new Luci and Ian Family Garden at a public grand opening on Sunday, May 4. The 4.5-acre Family Garden is the only native plant garden developed for families in Central Texas. It is designed to encourage hands-on, creative outdoor play, with sustainable features including giant birds' nests, a creek, caves, and a maze. The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center is located at 4801 La Crosse Avenue, Austin. To learn more about the Family Garden, built by SpawGlass, visit, http://www.wildflower.org/family_garden.

  

Kerrville: RNC Naturalist Susan Sander will present "Cinco de Mayo: Nature's Tex-Mex Connection," 6:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m., May 5, at Riverside Nature Center, 150 Francisco Lemos St., Kerrville. Wild things do not recognize political borders and many native plants can be found in Texas and Mexico. $10 suggested donation per family to $5/individual. For more information, email naturalist@riversidenaturecenter.org or visit www.riversidenaturecenter.org.

 

Humble: Mercer Arboretum & Botanic Gardens, 22306 Aldine Westfield Road, Humble, will host Cypress Creek Daylily Show, Saturday, May 10, noon-4:30 p.m. Come out to see favorite large and small blooms as they put on a stunning show! Cultivars like spiders with long, draping petals and others with frilled and picotee edges or dark eye zones will be on display. Daylilies bloom in the hot months in full sun and are show stoppers in any garden. 

 

La Marque: "Rainwater Harvesting" presented by GC Master Gardener Tim Jahnke, 9-11:00 a.m., May 10, at Galveston County AgriLife Extension in Carbide Park, 4102 Main, La Marque. Ph 281-534-3413; email reservations to galv3@wt.net, further details www.aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston. Free.

 

Rosenberg: "Backyard Basics - Culinary Herbs," sponsored by Fort Bend Master Gardeners will be presented Saturday, May 10. Learn which herbs to grow, how to grow them, and their culinary uses. Dual format: indoor program and outdoor instruction in the Master Gardeners' herb garden. Master Gardeners' Demonstration gardens open for tour. 8:30-11 a.m., Fort Bend County Extension Office, 1402 Band Rd, Rosenberg. $15 ($25 couple). For more information, call 281-342-3034, email brandy.rader@ag.tamu.edu, or visit http://fortbendagrilife.org or www.fbmg.com.

 

Seabrook: Harris County Master Gardeners will present "Insects in your Garden" at 6:30 p.m., Tuesday, May 13, at Clear Lake Park Meeting Rook, 5001 Nasa Parkway, Seabrook. For more information, visit https://hcmga.tamu.edu/Public/pubP2.aspx.  

 

Seguin: The Guadalupe Master Gardeners will meet on Thursday, May 15, at the Justice Center on 211 Court Street, Seguin. The meeting will start at 7 p.m., after a social function starting at 6:30. The topic is Guadalupe County's Heritage Pecans: Tips for a Successful Harvest, presented by John Pape and Kevin McCormick, of Pape Pecan Company, Seguin. For further information visit www.guadalupecountymastergardeners.org or call 830-303-3889.

 

La Marque: Tour three orchards during the "Galveston County Fruit Growers Tour," 9 a.m-noon.. May 17. For further details, contact the Galveston County AgriLife Extension in Carbide Park, 4102 Main, La Marque; Ph 281-534-3413; or email galv@wt.net, or see full details and maps at www.aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston. Free.

 

San Antonio: Gardening Volunteers of South Texas presents "Watersaver Landscape Design School" Saturday, May 31, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at San Antonio Garden Center, 3310 N. New Braunfels, San Antonio. Four presentations on Basic Principles of Low Water Landscapes, Design Ideas, Plants That Thrive in the San Antonio area, and Understanding and Scheduling Your Drip Irrigation System. $25 or $40 for household of two people. Includes three full color plant and landscape guides, and a CD version of the book "Drip-Line Gardening." After enrolling, you will receive graph paper to draw your yard and/or ideas to bring with you for one-on-one idea consultations after the presentations. Find more information and an enrollment form on the GVST website at www.GardeningVolunteers.org or info@gardeningvolunteers.org.

JUNE

 

Austin: The Garden Club of Austin's annual show & plant sale will be held June 6 and 7 at Zilker Park Botanical Gardens, 2220 Barton Springs Rd., Austin. The juried plant, vegetable & flower show is open to all amateur gardeners. Show contest plants will be accepted Friday, June 5, from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. and on Saturday, June 6, from 8 a.m. until 9:30 a.m. Plant sale hours will be Sat. from 9 until 5 and Sunday from 10 until 5. Enter your favorite plant or vegetable or buy some beautiful very well priced items at the plant sale. More information is available at www.thegardenclubofaustin.org. Click on events and scroll down to the garden show. 

 

Austin: The Austin Pond Society will host its 20th Annual Pond Tour in June and will feature ponds and gardens at more than 20 locations in North, Central and South Austin. Ponds of every size and description are included in the tour, along with waterfalls, streams, and fountains. Some gardens are Certified Wildlife Habitats, and most have native plants.Tour Dates and Times: Saturday, June 7 - South and Central Austin (9 a.m. to 5 p.m.) Saturday Night - Night pond locations (8 p.m. to 10 p.m.) Sunday, June 8 - North Austin (9 .am. to 5 p.m.) Wristbands for the three events are $15 in advance and can be purchased using PayPal at austinpondsociety.org; at Emerald Garden, Hill Country Water Gardens, McIntire's Garden Center, Shoal Creek Nursery, and The Great Outdoors. Wristbands can be purchased at each site during the event for $20. Wristbands for children 12 and under are free with a paid adult. Volunteers who work a four-hour shift on either day of the tour will receive entry to all of the tour sites, a tour T-shirt, and an invitation to the SPLASH! Party on May 31. Sign up at volunteers@austinpondsociety.org. For more information visit austinpondsociety.org.

Monthly meetings

 

If you would like your organization's events included in "Monthly Meetings" or would like to make a change to a listed meeting, please contact us at Monthly Meetings. To ensure inclusion in this column, please provide complete details. 

 

FIRST WEEK

 

Kaufman:The Kaufman County Master Gardeners meet the first Monday of each month at the First Community Church at 1401 Trinity Drive in Crandall. January through April and August and September meetings are at 9 a.m., with the remaining meetings beginning at 7 p.m. For additional information visit http://www.kcmga.org, call 972-932-9069 or email to sbburden@ag.tamu.edu.


Houston: The Harris County Master Gardeners meet at noon the first Tuesday of each month at the Texas AgriLife Extension, 3033 Bear Creek Drive (near the intersection of Highway 6 and Patterson Road), Houston. For additional information visit http://hcmga.tamu.edu
or call 281-855-5600.

 

Midland: The Permian Basin Master Gardeners meet at noon, the first Wednesday of each month at the Permian Basin Readiness Center at the Midland International Airport. For more information, call 432-498-4071.

  

Allen: The Allen Garden Club meets at 7 p.m. on the first Thursday of each month, February through December, at the Allen Heritage Center, 100 E. Main St., Allen. For more information, visit www.allengardenclub.org.

 

Brownwood: The Brown County Master Gardeners Association meets the first Thursday of each month from noon to 1 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 605 Fisk Ave., Brownwood. For further information, call Mary Green Engle at 325-784-8453.

 

Gonzalas: Gonzales Master Gardeners hold their monthly meeting at noon on the first Thursday of each month at 623 Fair Street, Gonzales. Bring a bag lunch, drinks provided. Contact AgriLife Extension Office at 830-672-8531 or visit http://gonzalesmastergardeners.org for more information.

 

SECOND WEEK

 

Austin: Austin Organic Gardeners Club meets at 6:30 p.m. on the second Monday of each month (except December) at the Austin Area Garden Center, 2220 Barton Springs Road, Zilker Botanical Gardens in Austin. For more information, visit www.austinorganicgardeners.org.

 

Marion: The Guadalupe County (Schertz/Seguin) Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets on the second Tuesday of each month except July, August and December at St. John's Lutheran Church in Marion. Directions to St. John's Lutheran Church: From FM 78 turn south onto FM 465 and the church is just past the Marion School on the right. From IH-10 go north on FM 465 towards Marion. The Church will be on the left, just before you get to town. A plant exchange and meet-and-greet begins at 6:30 p.m. followed by the program at 7 p.m. Visitors are welcome. For more information or an application to join NPSOT visit www.npsot.org/GuadalupeCounty/ or contact guadalupecounty@npsot.org.

 

Quitman: The Quitman Garden Club meets at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month at the Quitman Library on E Goode Street, Quitman. It is a diverse group that welcomes all visitors. For more information, e-mail quitmangardenclub@gmail.com.

 

Denton: The Denton County Master Gardener Association meets from 9:30 a.m. until 11 a.m. the

second Wednesday of each month at 401 W. Hickory St., Denton. Meetings are open to the public. More information is available at: http://dcmga.com/.

 

Humble: The Mercer Arboretum & Botanic Garden, 22306 Aldine Westfield Road, Humble, hosts a Lunch Bunch the second Wednesday of each month from noon until 2 p.m. Take a sack lunch or order a box lunch from Starbucks when you call 281-443-8731 to reserve your spot. Master Gardeners and Masters Naturalists may earn CEU credits by attending.

 

Jacksboro: The Jacksboro Garden Club meets at 9:30 a.m. the second Wednesday of each month (except June, July and August) at the Concerned Citizens Center, 400 East Pine Street, Jacksboro. For more information, call Melinda at 940-567-6218.

 

Longview: The Gregg County Master Gardeners Association meets the second Wednesday of each month from noon to 1 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 405 E. Marshall Ave., Longview. The public is invited to attend. There is an educational program preceding the business meeting. For further information call Cindy Gill at 903-236-8429 or visit www.gregg-tx.tamu.edu.

 

Rockport: The Rockport Herb & Rose Study Group, founded in March 2003, meets the

second Wednesday of each month at 10 a.m. at 619 N. Live Oak Street, Room 14, Rockport, to discuss all aspects of using and growing herbs, including historical uses and tips for successful propagation and cultivation. Sometimes they take field trips and have cooking demonstrations in different locations. For more information, contact Linda 361-729-6037, Ruth 361-729-8923 or Cindy 979-562-2153 or visit www.rockportherbs.org and http://rockportherbies.blogspot.com.

 

Woodway: The McLennan County Master Gardeners meet on the second Wednesday each month at noon at the Carleen Bright Arboretum, 9001 Bosque Blvd., Woodway. Educational programs follow the business session. For more information, call 254-757-5180.

 

Beaumont: The Jefferson County Master Gardeners meet at 7 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the AgriLife Extension Office, 1225 Pearl Street, Suite 200, Beaumont. For more information, call 409-835-8461.

 

Georgetown: The Williamson County Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the Georgetown Public Library, 402 W. 8th Street. Georgetown. For additional information, contract Billye Adams at 512-863-9636 or visit http://www.npsot.org/WilliamsonCounty/default.htm.

 

Orange: The Orange County Master Gardeners Association holds their monthly meeting on the

second Thursday of each month. A short program is presented. The meeting starts at 6:30 p.m. at the new Orange County Expo Center on Hwy 1442 in Orangefield. Enter the building in the front entrance, first door on the right, Texas AgriLife offices. Pot luck supper at 6 p.m. Visit http://txmg.org/orange for more information.

 

San Antonio: The San Antonio Herb Society meets at 7 p.m. on the second Thursday of each month at the San Antonio Garden Center, 3310 N. New Braunfels (corner of Funston & N. New Braunfels). For more information on programs, visit www.sanantonioherbs.org.

Smithville: The Smithville Community Gardens meets at 5:30 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the Smithville Recreation Center. 

 

Angleton: The Brazoria County Master Gardeners meet at 11 a.m. on the second Friday of each month at the Brazoria County Extension Office, 21017 County Road 171, Angleton. There is a general business meeting followed by a brief educational program each month. For further information call 979-864-1558, ext.110.

 

College Station: The A&M Garden Club meets on the second Friday of each month during the school year at 9:30 a.m. in the training room of the College Station Waste Water Facility building at the end of North Forest Parkway, College Station. Expert speakers, plant sharing, and federated club projects help members learn about gardening in the Brazos Valley, floral design, conservation, and more. For more information, visit http://www.amgardenclub.com/.

 

Houston: The Spring Branch African Violet Club meets the second Saturday of each month, January through November, at 10:30am at the Copperfield Baptist Church, 8350 Highway 6 North, Houston. Call Karla at 281-748-8417 prior to attending to confirm meeting date and time.

  

Kilgore: Northeast Texas Organic Gardeners meets at 1:30 p.m. on the second Saturday of each month. For more information, call Carole Ramke at 903-986-9475.

 

Dallas: The Rainbow Garden Club of North Texas meets the second Sunday of each month at 2 p.m. Everyone is welcome. Meetings are held at member's homes and garden centers around the area. For more information, visit www.RainbowGardenClub.com.

 

THIRD WEEK

 

Arlington: The Arlington Men's Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the third Monday of each month (except December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact Lance Jepson at LJepson@aol.com.

 

Cleburne: The Johnson County Master Gardeners meet at 2 p.m. on the third Monday of each month at McGregor House, 1628 W. Henderson, Cleburne, which includes a program and a meet & greet. For more information, call Sharon Smith at 817-894-7700.

  

New Braunfels: The Comal Master Gardeners meet at 6 p.m. the third Monday of each month (except April and December,) at the GVTC Auditorium, 36101 FM 3159, New Braunfels. An educational program precedes the business meeting. The public is invited to attend. For additional information, call 830-620-3440 or visit http://txmg.org/comal/.

 

Corpus Christi: The Nueces Master Gardeners meet at noon the third Tuesday of each month, except December, at Garden Senior Center, 5325 Greely Dr., Corpus Christi. An educational program precedes the business meeting. For further information call 361 767-5217.

 

Evant: The Evant Garden Club meets on the third Tuesday of each month at 10 a.m., usually at the bank in downtown Evant. To confirm the date, time and place of each month's meeting, call 254-471-5860.  

 

Rockport: Monthly meetings of the Aransas/San Patricio Master Gardeners are held at 10 a.m. on the third Tuesday of each month at Texas AgriLife Extension Service - Aransas County Office, 892 Airport Rd., Rockport. For additional information, e-mail aransas-tx@tamu.edu or call 361-790-0103.

 

Sugar Land: The Sugar Land Garden Club meets on the third Tuesday of each month, September through November and January through April at 10 a.m. at the Sugar Land Community Center, 226 Matlage Way, Sugar Land. The club hosts a different speaker each month. For more information, visit www.sugarlandgardenclub.org.

 

Denton: The Denton Organic Society, a group devoted to sharing information and educating the public regarding organic principles, meets the third Wednesday of each month (except July, August and December) at the Denton Senior Center, 509 N. Bell Avenue. Meetings are free and open to the public. Meetings begin at 7 p.m. and are preceded by a social at 6:30. For more information, call 940-382-8551.

 

Glen Rose: The Somervell County Master Gardeners meet at 10 a.m., the third Wednesday of each month at the Somervell County AgriLife Extension office, 1405 Texas Drive, Glen Rose. Visitors are welcome. For more information, call 254-897-2809 or visit www.somervellmastergardeners.org.

 

Granbury: The Lake Granbury Master Gardeners meet at 1 p.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at the Hood County Annex 1, 1410 West Pearl Street, Granbury. The public is invited to attend. There is an educational program each month preceding the business meeting. For information on topics call 817-579-3280 or visit http://www.hoodcountymastergardeners.org/.

 

Seabrook: The Harris County Precinct 2 Master Gardeners hold an educational program at 10 a.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at The Meeting Room at Clear Lake Park (on the Lakeside), 5001 NASA Road 1, Seabrook. The programs are free and open to the public. For more information, visit http://hcmgap2.tamu.edu.

 

Brownwood: Brownwood Garden Club meets the third Thursday of each month, 11:30 a.m.- 1 p.m.  The club meetings are at Southside Baptist Church, 1219 Indian Creek Road, with refreshments and a speaker presentation. Visitors are welcome. For more information, email boeblingen@centex.net or call 817-454-8175.

 

Houston: The Native Plant Society of Texas - Houston (NPSOT-H) meets at 7:30 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month except for October (4th Thursday) and December (2nd Thursday). Location varies. For locations, for more information on programs, and for information about native plants for Houston, visit http://www.npsot.org/Houston.

 

Seguin: The Guadalupe County Master Gardeners meets at 6:30 p.m. the third Thursday of each month, at the Justice Center, 211 Court Street, Seguin. After a brief social hour, the meeting and guest speaker begins at 7 p.m. The meeting is free and open to the public. For additional information, call 830-303-3889 or visit www.guadalupecountymastergardeners.org.

 

FOURTH WEEK

 

Brackenridge Park: The Native Plant Society San Antonio Chapter meets every fourth Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. in the Lions Field Adult and Senior Center, 2809 Broadway at E. Mulberry, Brackenridge Park, except August and December. Social and seed/plant exchange at 6:30 p.m. Free and open to the public. For more information, contact Bea at 210-999-7292 or visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio.

 

Bryan: The Brazos County Master Gardeners, a program of Texas AgriLife Extension, meet the fourth Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m. at the Brazos Center, 3232 Briarcrest Drive, Bryan. There is a public gardening program at each meeting and pertinent information may be found at brazosmg.com or 979-823-0129.

 

Edna: The Jackson County Master Gardeners present their "Come Grown With Us" seminars on the fourth Tuesday of each month, January through October, beginning at 7 p.m. at 411 N. Wells, Edna. The seminars are free, open to the public and offer 2 CEU hours to Master Gardeners or others requiring them. For additional information, contact the Jackson County Extension Office at 361-782-3312.

 

Linden: The Caddo Wildflower Chapter of Native Plants Society meets the fourth Tuesday of each month at the senior citizens building at 507 S Kaufman St. in Linden at 6:30. Visitors are welcome. For additional information, contact Karen Tromza at khtromza@yahoo.com.

 

Fort Worth: The Organic Garden Club of Forth Worth meets at 7 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday of each month except July and December at the Deborah Beggs Moncrief Garden Center, 3220 Botanic Blvd., Ft. Worth. Refreshments are served. For more information, call 817-263-9322 or visit www.ogcfw.webs.com.

 

San Antonio: The Native Plant Society of Texas San Antonio Chapter meets the fourth Tuesday of each month, except August and December, at the Lions Field Adult & Senior Center, 2809 Broadway, San Antonio. Social and plant/seed exchange at 6:30 p.m., program at 7:00 p.m. For more information, visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio or email npsot.sanantonio@gmail.com.

 

Houston: The Houston Chapter of the Native Prairie Association of Texas (HNPAT) meets from 7 p.m. until 8:30 p.m. the fourth Thursday of each month at 3015 Richmond Ave., Houston. For more information, contact hnpat@prairies.org.

 

Leander: The Leander Garden Club meets on the fourth Thursday of each month (except July and August) at 10:30 a.m. at the community room behind the Greater Texas Federal Credit Union,1300 N. Bell, Cedar Park, unless there is special event planned. Following a program and short business meeting, we share a pot-luck luncheon. To confirm the meeting place and time, please call president Cathy Clark-Ramsey at 512-963-4698 or email info@leandergc.org.

 

Dallas: The Dallas County Master Gardeners meet the fourth Thursday of each month at 11:30 a.m. For location and program information, visit http://www.dallascountymastergardeners.org/ or contact The Helpdesk, M-F, 8 to 4:30 214-904-3053.

 

Dallas: The Greater Dallas Organic Garden Club meets at 7:00 p.m. on the fourth Thursday of each month at the REI, 4515 LBJ Freeway, Dallas. For more information, call 214-824-2448 or visit www.gdogc.org.

  

Arlington: The Arlington Organic Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the last Thursday of each month (except November and December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact David at 817-483-7746.

Texas Gardener digital edition available

Same magazine as our print edition without the paper and at a better price. Fully compatible with your desktop, laptop, iPad or Tablet. Access Texas Gardener anywhere, anytime: at the office, home, vacation, even in the garden. Easy to use with robust features and fully searchable archive as long as your subscription is active. Visit www.TexasGardener.com and click on the digital radio button to subscribe.
Garden success starts here!

Make gardening easier and more enjoyable in 2014. No more keeping it in your head or, worse yet, juggling all those wrinkled, sweat-stained pieces of paper that seem to accumulate and end up lost. It's time to get organized and the perfect way to start that off is with your very own copy of the 2014 Texas Gardener Planning Guide and Calendar. No more guessing when to plant or do different activities. You will find everything you need in one simple but informative guide and calendar. Plus plenty of room to record your own planting dates, rainfall events and other data for future reference.

Here's a sample of what you will find in this information-packed guide:
  • Many, many practical and timely garden tips that are for Texas - not Maine or California!
  • Organic, earth friendly tips to make your garden grow and prosper
  • Lots of space to record your own activities for future reference
  • Planting dates and tips for vegetables, flowers, herbs, fruit and lawns
Order today, while it is fresh on your mind. Don't forget to order copies for your gardening friends and relatives!

Only $12.80 per copy (includes shipping, handling and tax).

To order using your credit card, call toll-free 1-800-727-9020 or online at
www.TexasGardener.com.
Buy two books, receive cap free!

The Vegetable Book

By Dr. Sam Cotner

 

Finally, back by popular demand and in its fourth printing, the most informative and comprehensive "how-to" book on vegetable gardening in Texas (also, suitable for most other areas of the South) written by the late, great Dr. Sam Cotner, former head of horticulture at Texas A&M University and lifelong gardener. This interesting read has over 370 pages of detailed information on every crop, from Asparagus to Watermelon including problem/solving sections for each vegetable. If you want to maximize your enjoyment and success growing vegetables in Texas, this book is a "must have," whether you are a beginner or a seasoned gardener. Price $34.02

The Texas Tomato Lover's Handbook

By William D. Adams

 

The best thing for tomato enthusiasts since the tomato itself! Adams draws on more than thirty years of experience to provide a complete, step-by-step guide to success in the tomato patch. Learn everything from soil preparation, planting, feeding, caging and watering. Liberally sprinkled with the author's easy humor and illustrated with his own excellent photographs, this must-have book has everything you'll need to assure a bumper crop! 189 pages. Lots of color photographs! Price: $31.94

Order both books, receive a FREE Texas Gardener cap!

($15.82 if ordered separately)

 

Remit payment to:

TG Books * PO Box 9005 * Waco, TX 76714

or call Toll-Free 1-800-727-9020

 

American Express, Visa, MasterCard and Discover Accepted

Texas Gardener's Seeds is published weekly. Suntex Communications, Inc. 2014. All rights reserved. You may forward this publication to your friends and colleagues if it is sent in its entirety. No individual part of this newsletter may be reproduced in any manner without prior written permission from the publisher.

 

Missed an issue? Back issues of Texas Gardener's Seeds April 2006-September 2013 are available at www.texasgardener.com/newsletters. Back issues beginning October 2013 are available here

 

Publisher: Chris S. Corby ● Editor: Michael Bracken 

 

Texas Gardener's Seeds, P.O. Box 9005, Waco, Texas 76714

www.TexasGardener.com