January 22, 2014
  

Ten money-saving tips

 

Birds & Blooms  

 

You can easily give your space a refresh without breaking the bank by finding new uses for several items you probably lying around the house or garage.

 

Make your garden look glamorous and leave the neighbors wondering how you did it with these simple, money-saving tips:

 

1. Reuse and Recycle. Use objects like recycled cans, worn boots, damaged watering cans, old teapots and even discarded sinks as containers for herbs, flowers and houseplants. They contribute a touch of whimsy and even a "settled look" to a garden scene.

 

2. Paper Bag Rescue. Paper bags protect vulnerable plants from frost by trapping warmer air and insulating the plant. Set them upside down over tops of plants when frost threatens and place soil or rock over the edges of the bags to hold them in place. Remove in the morning so the plants can receive warm sun and any nighttime dampness can evaporate.

 

3. Tool Savvy. Did you know forks, knives and spoons can make great garden tools? They're tough and sharp enough to do the job without causing damage. Use them to separate flats, lift seedlings, and tease apart dense root balls. Save yourself a trip to the hardware store just by checking your kitchen drawers.

 

4. A New Use for Newspapers. Newspaper keeps light and unwanted intruders out of the soil. It also snuffs out grass and prevents weed germination for new garden beds. Thicker layers are most effective for keeping out grass (up to 30 sheets will do).

 

5. Canned. Tin cans make good collars to thwart destructive cutworms by creating a physical barrier they cannot cross. Instead of tossing out your tin cans, cut the tops and bottoms, press them into the soil, then plant seeds or seedlings within.

 

6. Ground Your Grounds. Sprinkle coffee grounds on the ground at the base of certain plants. Adding the organic matter to the soil helps improve drainage in clay and water. It can be used on any plant, especially those that like rich, moist organic soils, such as azaleas and blueberries.

 

7. Clean Out the Pests. Soap is thought to keep deer from feasting on your trees and plants. Break a bar of soap into several pieces and hang them from strings or in old nylons or net bags on your trees or other structures near prime feeding areas. The strong scent of deodorant in the bar may deter other backyard pests as well.

 

8. Pie Tin Tactics. Aluminum pie tins can scare pests away, at least temporarily. Tins make an annoying noise as they bang around in the breeze. They also flash reflected light, which may be disconcerting. Tie them to a string and hang them from branches, a trellis, or your garden fence.

 

9. Potted Packing Peanuts. Packing peanuts improve drainage in pots by permitting water, but not soil, to pass through. This is a great way to reduce soil-mix use in large pots and also makes them weigh less, so they're easier to pick up or move around. Layer them out of sight in the bottom of the pot, and then add soil.

 

10. Nylon Support. Old hosiery is soft and flexible and can be used to tie up floppy plants without causing damage. They can also be used to line bottoms of pots so water can get out but dirt can't.

 

Local garden center named one of five best in nation

 

The Natural Gardener, Austin's own Organic Gardening Headquarters, was named the Best Garden Center of the Southwest by Today's Garden Center, a national trade magazine; ranking it as one of the five best in the nation.

 

Every year, Today's Garden Center magazine puts together a list of 100 independent garden centers they consider the most revolutionary in America. The Revolutionary 100 Awards is an annual survey that focuses on the garden centers' abilities to operate an innovative and profitable business while creating a unique customer experience. The awards are open to any independent garden center that wishes to complete the survey.

 

Garden center managers and owners fill out a comprehensive questionnaire covering a wide range of topics including company philosophy, marketing, and staff education. The answers are tallied based on a point system and the top 100 scores are named the top 100 garden centers in the country. From the list of 100, five garden centers are chosen as the best in their Region, with one garden center earning the top spot as Best in America.

 

"It is nice to be recognized by our peers in the industry. I am very proud of my staff, both past and present, who worked very hard to make the store what it is. I appreciate our customers and community and how supportive they are of organic gardening. We wouldn't be here without them," says John L. Dromgoole, owner. "I hope that our garden center will inspire others to consider going organic, too."

 

The Natural Gardener is a destination garden center, located on 8 acres near the "Y" in Oak Hill, which has served Austin organically for 25 years. Numerous demonstration gardens allow customers to find beautiful inspiration for their own landscape and see organic management practices in action. The gardens feature native and drought-tolerant ornamentals and seasonally appropriate edible plants in their large vegetable garden and orchard. The gardens also serve as a classroom to teach anyone interested in learning how the organic method works. In addition to the demonstration gardens, The Natural Gardener also offers free weekly classes, an Information Desk to diagnose diseases and other problems, and knowledgeable staff to help with plant selections.

 

What makes The Natural Gardener revolutionary is an unwavering commitment to organics. The Natural Gardener was the first to offer organic and natural products and has never strayed from its message. John Dromgoole, a true organic pioneer, muses that he is not a "born again organic gardener, I have been organic from the very beginning." Their line of high-quality organic products, including aerobic compost tea, and bulk garden soils also set them apart from many other nurseries in the nation.

 

The Natural Gardener will continue to be an innovator within the industry with a commitment to help Austinites create a sustainable community in response to a changing climate. "We want to continue to be a role model and stimulate a conversation about our environment that will influence customers and garden centers alike."

Gardening tips

 

Now is the time to set out onion transplants. Select the ones that come in bundles that are green and less than a pencil width in size. Avoid the ones that come as small dry bulbs. Plant about 1 inch deep, water and apply a water-soluble fertilizer. If you like green onions for salads and other uses, plant your onions an inch or two apart in the row. Then you can thin them for fresh use as the season progresses. For really large onions, thin to four to six inches apart and side dress with a high nitrogen fertilizer every couple of weeks and keep well watered. Our favorite varieties are Candy and 1015Y. 

 

Have a favorite gardening tip you'd like to share? Texas Gardener's Seeds is seeking brief gardening tips from Texas gardeners to use in future issues. If we publish your tip in Seeds, we will send you a free Texas Gardener 2014 Planning Guide & Calendar. Please send your tips of 50 words or less to the editor at: Gardening Tips. 

Upcoming garden events
 
If you would like your organization's events included in "Upcoming Garden Events" or would like to make a change to a listed event, please contact us at Garden Events. To ensure inclusion in this column, please provide complete details at least three weeks prior to the event.

JANUARY  

 

Humble: "Creating Your Personal Garden Sanctuary" will be presented 8 a.m.-1:30 p.m., Thursday, January 23, at Mercer Arboretum & Botanic Garden, 22306 Aldine Westfield Road. Humble. This hands-on class, taught by Darnell Schreiber, will guide participants in designing the perfect serene space for any home landscape and includes a tour of Mercer's gardens. Bring personal garden photos and a pair of scissors. Seating is limited, so please call 281-443-8731 to make reservations.

 

Houston: Beth Clark, retired landscape architect and principal and Clark Condon Associates, will present "From Developer Dirt to Meadows," at the January meeting of the Houston Chapter-Native Prairies Association of Texas, 3015 Richmond Ave., Houston, Thursday, January 23. The meeting begins at 6:30 with the presentation at 7. For additional information, contact hnpat@texasprarie.org.

 

San Antonio: Green Spaces will host a Seed Swap 6 p.m.-8 p.m., Thursday, January 23, at the Reconciliation Oaks Community Garden, 8900 Starcrest, San Antonio. For more information, visit www.greensatx.org, email info@greensatx.org, or call 210-222-8430.  

 

Cleburne: The Johnson County Herb Society is hosting a Seed Swap Saturday, January 25, 1 p.m.-4 p.m. at the Cultural Arts Center, 425 Granbury, Cleburne. Take at least 5 packs of seeds purchased or gathered with at least 10 seeds in every pack. Be sure to label each pack with date gathered, variety, color and planting instructions. For each pack you bring you will receive 1 ticket for which you can swap for other seed packs. If you forget your seeds or just want to stop in, a selection of seeds will be for sale at $1.00 each. For additional information, contact Pat Kriener at 817-793-4625.  

 

Conroe: The Montgomery County Master Gardeners are having their annual Fruit and Nut Tree Sale, featuring bare-root fruit trees from apples to pomegranates, pecans and more, on Saturday, January 25, at 9020 Airport Road, Conroe. Program is at 8 a.m.; sale is from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. For more information, call 936-539-7824 or visit www.mcmga.com.

 

La Marque: "Growing Great Tomatoes (Part 2)" will be presented Saturday, January 25, 9 a.m.-11:30 a.m. at Galveston County AgriLife Extension Office in Carbide Park, 4102 Main Street (FM 519), La Marque. The second part of the three-part program on Growing Great Tomatoes in Galveston County. Galveston County Master Gardener Ira Gervais reveals secrets for planting and growing great tomatoes. Learn about the various varieties that do well in the area, how to make your selections, how and when to transplant your seedlings and various growing techniques. Find out about soil requirements and needed nutrients and the temperature ranges for best tomato fruit set. For course reservations, call 281-534-3413, ext. 12 or email GALV3@wt.net.

 

La Marque: "Growing Blueberries" will be presented Saturday, January 25, 1-3 p.m. at Galveston County AgriLife Extension Office in Carbide Park, 4102 Main Street (FM 519), La Marque. Presented by Dr. David Cohen, an accomplished home grower of blueberries by avocation and a practicing physician by trade, Dr. Cohen has an impressive "blueberry patch" as part of his home landscape and has gained considerable hands-on experience with successfully growing blueberries under local growing conditions. Learn the facts about blueberries and site selection and preparation. Find out about variety recommendations for the area and the planting, spacing, fertilizing and pruning requirements. The program will also cover harvesting and understanding the problems and the costs of growing blueberries in Galveston County. For course reservations, call 281-534-3413, ext. 12 or email GALV3@wt.net.

 
Humble: Mercer Arboretum & Botanic Gardens and The Mercer Society (TMS), will offer the third and final segment of the Texas Gulf Coast Gardener (TGCG) program beginning Monday, January 27 for a six-week period onsite at Mercer, 22306 Aldine Westfield Road, Humble. Registration is open now through January 20, so call 281-443-8731 or visit the park to enroll. Tier 3 classes focus on landscape design, the use of hardscapes and water features in the landscape, and sustainable design practices. Participants will be introduced to an effective process for analyzing and designing a successful landscape, with emphasis on residential sites. A broad range of exciting lessons and lectures, presented by Mercer staff and experts from the greater-Houston area, will accompany practical design workshops with such topics as designing mixed borders; effective water use and conservation in the home landscape; and ways to incorporate fruit- and vegetable-producing plants into visually-appealing landscape designs. Classes will be held every Monday from January 27 through March 3 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. with a one-hour lunch break. The cost of enrollment for TMS members is $100; enrollment for non-members is $115. Participants will receive a text book, class supplies, and a custom-designed TGCG gardening apron. The TGCG curriculum was developed by Mercer staff with guidance from Dr. David Creech, professor of horticulture at Stephen F. Austin State University, and staff from Mast Arboretum in Nacogdoches. The program gives participants the knowledge and skills needed to start, develop, and maintain their own gardens through a variety of gardening and horticulture topics specifically designed for the pleasures and challenges of the Texas Gulf Coast climate.

Dallas: "Native & Adaptive Plants for North Texas" will be offered January 28, 6:30p.m.-8:30 p.m. Texas A&M AgriLife Research l Extension Center at Dallas, 17360 Coit Rd, Dallas. Are you a "Native Texan" or a transplant? Plants are native or transplants too!! This program covers a large selection of minimal water use plants that are native and adaptive ideal for a sustainable landscape or garden. You will learn proper soil preparation, proper planting, and native and adaptive plant selection. Plant list provided. Dates and times are subject to change. Register at dallas.tamu.edu/courses.


La Marque: "Growing Citrus in Your Own Backyard" will be presented Tuesday, January 28, 6:30 p.m.-8 p.m. at Galveston County AgriLife Extension Office in Carbide Park, 4102 Main Street (FM 519), La Marque. Galveston County Master Gardener Chris Anastas will present a program on how to successfully grow citrus trees. The presentation will cover such topics as rootstock and variety selection, cultural care of trees, typical disease and insect pest problems, and freeze protection. For course reservations, call 281-534-3413, ext. 12 or email GALV3@wt.net.

 

Dallas: "Rain Water Harvesting-Large System" will be offered January 29, 9 a.m.-noon at Texas A&M AgriLife Research l Extension Center at Dallas, 17360 Coit Rd, Dallas. Is 55 gallons not enough for you? Think "Big Tank" and save on your water bill! This program covers design, construction, maintenance and benefits of a large rainwater collection system. Participants will learn how to calculate rainwater capture, design an above or below ground collection system and utilize rainwater using large tank systems for home or business applications. This program will also cover installing drip irrigation. Dates and times are subject to change. Register at dallas.tamu.edu/courses.

 

Humble: "Distinguished Lecture Series: Plant Conservation in a Rapidly Changing World" will be offered Thursday., January 30, 6:30 p.m. at Mercer Arboretum & Botanic Gardens, 22306 Aldine Westfield Road, Humble. Join Dr. Peter Raven, president emeritus of Missouri Botanical Gardens in St. Louis, at the Houston Museum of Natural Science (HMNS) during this look at the various factors threatening plant species and the conservation methods that can help save them. For ticket information, please call HMNS at 713-639-4629. 


FEBRUARY

 

Nacogdoches: SFA Gardens will host a special lecture at 7 p.m., Tuesday, February 4, Dr. Peter H. Raven, president emeritus of the St. Louis Botanical garden and renowned conservationist will be speaking on "Conservation in a Rapidly Changing World." Raven's lecture will be the inaugural lecture in the new Ina Brundrett Conservation Education Building. Raven is one of the world's leading botanists and advocates of conservation and biodiversity. For four decades, he headed the Missouri Botanical Garden, an institution he nurtured into a world-class center for botanical research and education, and horticultural display. He retired as president in 2010 and assumed the role of president emeritus and consultant through 2014. Described by Time magazine as a "Hero for the Planet," Raven champions research around the world to preserve endangered plants, and he is a leading advocate for conservation and a sustainable environment. In recognition of his work in science and conservation, Raven is the recipient of numerous prizes and awards, including the prestigious International Prize for Biology from the government of Japan and the U.S. National Medal of Science, the country's highest award for scientific accomplishment. He has held Guggenheim and John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation fellowships. Raven was a member of President Bill Clinton's Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology. He also served for 12 years as home secretary of the National Academy of Sciences and is a member of the academies of science in Argentina, Brazil, China, Denmark, India, Italy, Mexico, Russia, Sweden, the U.K., and several other countries. The author of numerous books and reports, both popular and scientific, Raven co-wrote Biology of Plants, an internationally best-selling textbook, now in its sixth edition. He also co-authored Environment, a leading textbook on the environment. The Ina Brundrett Conservation Education Building is located at the Stephen F. Austin State University Pineywoods Native Plant Center, 2900 Raguet St., Nacogdoches. The event will be free and open to the public but to ensure seating and for more information call 936-468-1832 or e-mail erodewald@sfasu.edu. 

 

Ft. Worth: It's every vegetable gardener's goal to raise the perfect tomato. Whether you are a novice or experienced, tomato growers will learn step-by-step how to grow the best tomatoes for North Texas at the Tarrant County Master Gardeners Association Spring Conference "Tomato Roundup: All you ever wanted to know about growing tomatoes" on Saturday, February 8, 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., at the Resource Connection, 2300 Circle Drive, Fort Worth. Speakers will be William "Bill" Adams and Tom LeRoy. Both are retired Texas A&M AgriLife Extension agents whose books include "The Texas Tomato Lovers Handbook," "The Southern Kitchen Garden" and "Commonsense Vegetable Gardening in the South." Topics include: selecting the best tomato variety, grafting tomatoes, selecting the best location, fertilization, irrigation, insects and diseases and weed control. There will be time for Q&A with the speakers. There will be breakout sessions on make and take tomato cages or simple drip irrigation unit; examples of three types of raised beds; and cooking with tomatoes. Cost of the conference is $45 including lunch. Check the website at tarrantmg.org for the conference brochure and registration information. Or contact Pam Braak at 817-488-5665 or p.braak@verizon.net.    

 

New Braunfels: The Comal Master Gardener Association will host its third annual Spring Seminar from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. February 8 at the New Braunfels Civic Center. The program is "Specialty Gardens in the Landscape" and will present programs on Container Gardens, Succulent Gardens, Herb Gardens, Pollinator Gardens and Rose Gardens. Cost is $49 per person and includes lunch and snacks. For additional information or to register, go to: txmg.org/comal/seminar.  

 

Schertz: Do you enjoy the colors and antics of butterflies, hummingbirds, and song birds in your garden? Want to find out how you can entice them to visit your yard? Then attend the Natives to Fly For: Attracting Butterflies, Hummingbirds, and Song Birds to Your Yard workshop. This daylong event will feature four experts to show you how you can have lots of little visitors in your landscape: Craig Hensley, award-winning community educator with Texas Parks & Wildlife, will explain "Butterfly Basics: Who They Are and What They Need"; Mark Klym, coauthor of Hummingbirds of Texas, will speak on "Want Hummingbirds? Think Lasagna"; Ann Mallard, Audubon Society member and nature photographer specializing in bird life, will present "Songs in the Garden--Creating a Native Habitat for Birds"; Kelly Simon, author of Texas Wildscapes: Gardening for Wildlife, will pull all this information together as she shows participants how to create a "Central Texas Habitat." The workshop takes place Saturday, February 22, at the Schertz Civic Center, 1400 Schertz Pkwy, Schertz. The hours are 9-3 and the $40 registration fee includes lunch and snacks. Registration begins at 8:30. Door prizes will be given throughout the day. In addition to the workshop, participants can shop the booths of two local nurseries offering many of the plants discussed by the speakers, purchase books on workshop topics, and select bird-related items from Wild Birds Unlimited. Authors Mark Klym and Kelly Bender will sign their books during lunch. But wait, there's more! A beautiful bluebonnet quilt and two 55-gallon, hand-painted rain barrels will be raffled during the workshop. Raffle tickets may be purchased at the event. Natives to Fly For is sponsored by the Guadalupe County Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas. For more information and to purchase tickets, call 830-303-0333. The number of tickets is limited, so call early. For more information, visit http://npsot.org/wp/guadalupe/

MARCH

 

Jacksonville: The Cherokee County Master Gardener Association will hold their annual Spring Conference March 8. The conference will be held at the First Christian Church Fellowship Hall, 1920 Beaumont Street, Jacksonville. Registration will begin at 8:30 a.m. and the first speaker will be at 9 a.m. There will be a $10.00 fee which includes drinks, refreshments and a chance to win one of four door prizes. The program will feature three well known respected speakers. Greg Grant is Lecturer in the School of Horticulture at Stephen F. Austin State University. He was formerly the Cherokee County Horticulturist with the Texas Cooperative Extension in Rusk. He is also co-author, with William C. Welch, of the book Southern Heirloom Garden, and he is a columnist for Texas Gardener magazine. He has traveled extensively to botanical and public gardens throughout the United States and Europe and is a popular public speaker in the southern United States. Dave Whitinger is the creator of several large and popular websites, most notably Dave's Garden and All Things Plants. He moved to Cherokee County in late 2007 and lives just outside Jacksonville with his wife and 6 children. They have a homestead with extensive gardens, cows, chickens, and various other domestic animals. In addition to being a member of the Cherokee County Master Gardeners, Dave is also a software programmer whose passion is to bring gardeners together and provide them with custom made software tools that both serve gardeners as well as take online gardening to the next level. Keith Hansen has been the Texas AgriLife Horticulturist for Smith County since 1992. Prior to that, he was the extension agent for Nueches County. Keith has a weekly column, "Keeping it Green," in the Tyler Morning Telegraph and has written numerous articles for other publications. For more information, contact Ginny Scurlock at 903-530-8610 or at ginnyscurlock@yahoo.com.
Monthly meetings

 

If you would like your organization's events included in "Monthly Meetings" or would like to make a change to a listed meeting, please contact us at Monthly Meetings. To ensure inclusion in this column, please provide complete details. 

 

FIRST WEEK

 

Houston: The Harris County Master Gardeners meet at noon the first Tuesday of each month at the Texas AgriLife Extension, 3033 Bear Creek Drive (near the intersection of Highway 6 and Patterson Road), Houston. For additional information visit http://hcmga.tamu.edu or call 281-855-5600.

 

Wichita Falls: The Wichita County Master Gardener Association meets at 5:30 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 600 Scott Street, Wichita Falls, on the first Tuesday of each month. For more information, visit www.txmg.org/wichita or call 940-716-8610.

 

Kilgore: Northeast Texas Organic Gardeners meets at 1 p.m. on the first Wednesday of each month. For more information, call Carole Ramke at 903-986-9475.

 

Midland: The Permian Basin Master Gardeners meet at noon, the first Wednesday of each month at the Permian Basin Readiness Center at the Midland International Airport. For more information, call 432-498-4071.

  

Allen: The Allen Garden Club meets at 7 p.m. on the first Thursday of each month, February through December, at the Allen Heritage Center, 100 E. Main St., Allen. For more information, visit www.allengardenclub.org.

 

Brownwood: The Brown County Master Gardeners Association meets the first Thursday of each month from noon to 1 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 605 Fisk Ave., Brownwood. For further information, call Mary Green Engle at 325-784-8453.

 

Gonzalas: Gonzales Master Gardeners hold their monthly meeting at noon on the first Thursday of each month at 623 Fair Street, Gonzales. Bring a bag lunch, drinks provided. Contact AgriLife Extension Office at 830-672-8531 or visit http://gonzalesmastergardeners.org for more information.

 

SECOND WEEK

 

Austin: Austin Organic Gardeners Club meets at 6:30 p.m. on the second Monday of each month (except December) at the Austin Area Garden Center, 2220 Barton Springs Road, Zilker Botanical Gardens in Austin. For more information, visit www.austinorganicgardeners.org.

 

Evant: The Evant Garden Club meets on the second Tuesday of each month at 10 a.m., usually at the bank in downtown Evant. To confirm the date, time and place of each month's meeting, call 254-471-5585.

 

Marion: The Guadalupe County (Schertz/Seguin) Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets on the second Tuesday of each month except July, August and December at St. John's Lutheran Church in Marion. Directions to St. John's Lutheran Church: From FM 78 turn south onto FM 465 and the church is just past the Marion School on the right. From IH-10 go north on FM 465 towards Marion. The Church will be on the left, just before you get to town. A plant exchange and meet-and-greet begins at 6:30 p.m. followed by the program at 7 p.m. Visitors are welcome. For more information or an application to join NPSOT visit www.npsot.org/GuadalupeCounty/ or contact guadalupecounty@npsot.org.

 

Quitman: The Quitman Garden Club meets at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month at the Quitman Library on E Goode Street, Quitman. It is a diverse group that welcomes all visitors. For more information, e-mail quitmangardenclub@gmail.com.

 

Denton: The Denton County Master Gardener Association meets from 9:30 a.m. until 11 a.m. the second Wednesday of each month at 401 W. Hickory St., Denton. Meetings are open to the public. More information is available at: http://dcmga.com/.

 

Humble: The Mercer Arboretum & Botanic Garden, 22306 Aldine Westfield Road, Humble, hosts a Lunch Bunch the second Wednesday of each month from noon until 2 p.m. Take a sack lunch or order a box lunch from Starbucks when you call 281-443-8731 to reserve your spot. Master Gardeners and Masters Naturalists may earn CEU credits by attending.

 

Jacksboro: The Jacksboro Garden Club meets at 9:30 a.m. the second Wednesday of each month (except June, July and August) at the Concerned Citizens Center, 400 East Pine Street, Jacksboro. For more information, call Melinda at 940-567-6218.

 

Longview: The Gregg County Master Gardeners Association meets the second Wednesday of each month from noon to 1 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 405 E. Marshall Ave., Longview. The public is invited to attend. There is an educational program preceding the business meeting. For further information call Cindy Gill at 903-236-8429 or visit www.gregg-tx.tamu.edu.

 

Rockport: The Rockport Herb & Rose Study Group, founded in March 2003, meets the second  

Wednesday of each month at 10 a.m. at 619 N. Live Oak Street, Room 14, Rockport, to discuss all aspects of using and growing herbs, including historical uses and tips for successful propagation and cultivation. Sometimes they take field trips and have cooking demonstrations in different locations. For more information, contact Linda 361-729-6037, Ruth 361-729-8923 or Cindy 979-562-2153 or visit www.rockportherbs.org and http://rockportherbies.blogspot.com.

 

Woodway: The McLennan County Master Gardeners meet on the second Wednesday each month at noon at the Carleen Bright Arboretum, 9001 Bosque Blvd., Woodway. Educational programs follow the business session. For more information, call 254-757-5180.

 

Beaumont: The Jefferson County Master Gardeners meet at 7 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the AgriLife Extension Office, 1225 Pearl Street, Suite 200, Beaumont. For more information, call 409-835-8461.

 

Georgetown: The Williamson County Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the Georgetown Public Library, 402 W. 8th Street. Georgetown. For additional information, contract Billye Adams at 512-863-9636 or visit http://www.npsot.org/WilliamsonCounty/default.htm.

 

Orange: The Orange County Master Gardeners Association holds their monthly meeting on the second Thursday of each month. A short program is presented. The meeting starts at 6:30 p.m. at the new Orange County Expo Center on Hwy 1442 in Orangefield. Enter the building in the front entrance, first door on the right, Texas AgriLife offices. Pot luck supper at 6 p.m. Visit http://txmg.org/orange for more information.

 

San Antonio: The San Antonio Herb Society meets at 7 p.m. on the second Thursday of each month at the San Antonio Garden Center, 3310 N. New Braunfels (corner of Funston & N. New Braunfels). For more information on programs, visit www.sanantonioherbs.org.

 

Angleton: The Brazoria County Master Gardeners meet at 11 a.m. on the second Friday of each month at the Brazoria County Extension Office, 21017 County Road 171, Angleton. There is a general business meeting followed by a brief educational program each month. For further information call 979-864-1558, ext.110.

 

College Station: The A&M Garden Club meets on the second Friday of each month during the school year at 9:30 a.m. in the training room of the College Station Waste Water Facility building at the end of North Forest Parkway, College Station. Expert speakers, plant sharing, and federated club projects help members learn about gardening in the Brazos Valley, floral design, conservation, and more. For more information, visit http://www.amgardenclub.com/.

 

Houston: The Spring Branch African Violet Club meets the second Saturday of each month, January through November, at 10:30am at the Copperfield Baptist Church, 8350 Highway 6 North, Houston. Call Karla at 281-748-8417 prior to attending to confirm meeting date and time.

 

Dallas: The Rainbow Garden Club of North Texas meets the second Sunday of each month at 2 p.m. Everyone is welcome. Meetings are held at member's homes and garden centers around the area. For more information, visit www.RainbowGardenClub.com.

 

THIRD WEEK

 

Arlington: The Arlington Men's Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the third Monday of each month (except December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact Lance Jepson at LJepson@aol.com.

 

Cleburne: The Johnson County Master Gardeners meet at 2 p.m. on the third Monday of each month at McGregor House, 1628 W. Henderson, Cleburne, which includes a program and a meet & greet. For more information, call Sharon Smith at 817-894-7700.

 

New Braunfels: The Comal Master Gardeners meet at 6 p.m. the  third Monday of each month (except April and December,) at the GVTC Auditorium, 36101 FM 3159, New Braunfels. An educational program precedes the business meeting. The public is invited to attend. For additional information, call 830-620-3440 or visit  http://txmg.org/comal/. 

 

Corpus Christi: The Nueces Master Gardeners meet at noon the third Tuesday of each month, except December, at Garden Senior Center, 5325 Greely Dr., Corpus Christi. An educational program precedes the business meeting. For further information call 361 767-5217.

 

Rockport: Monthly meetings of the Aransas/San Patricio Master Gardeners are held at 10 a.m. on the third Tuesday of each month at Texas AgriLife Extension Service - Aransas County Office, 892 Airport Rd., Rockport. For additional information, e-mail aransas-tx@tamu.edu or call 361-790-0103.

 

Sugar Land: The Sugar Land Garden Club meets on the third Tuesday of each month, September through Novemberand January through April at 10 a.m. at the Sugar Land Community Center, 226 Matlage Way, Sugar Land. The club hosts a different speaker each month. For more information, visit www.sugarlandgardenclub.org.

 

Denton: The Denton Organic Society, a group devoted to sharing information and educating the public regarding organic principles, meets the third Wednesday of each month (except July, August and December) at the Denton Senior Center, 509 N. Bell Avenue. Meetings are free and open to the public. Meetings begin at 7 p.m. and are preceded by a social at 6:30. For more information, call 940-382-8551.

 

Glen Rose: The Somervell County Master Gardeners meet at 10 a.m., the third Wednesday of each month at the Somervell County AgriLife Extension office, 1405 Texas Drive, Glen Rose. Visitors are welcome. For more information, call 254-897-2809 or visit www.somervellmastergardeners.org.

 

Granbury: The Lake Granbury Master Gardeners meet at 1 p.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at the Hood County Annex 1, 1410 West Pearl Street, Granbury. The public is invited to attend. There is an educational program each month preceding the business meeting. For information on topics call 817-579-3280 or visit http://www.hoodcountymastergardeners.org/.

 

Seabrook: The Harris County Precinct 2 Master Gardeners hold an educational program at 10 a.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at The Meeting Room at Clear Lake Park (on the Lakeside), 5001 NASA Road 1, Seabrook. The programs are free and open to the public. For more information, visit http://hcmgap2.tamu.edu.

 

Brownwood: Brownwood Garden Club meets the third Thursday of each month, 11:30 a.m.- 1 p.m.  The club meetings are at Southside Baptist Church, 1219 Indian Creek Road, with refreshments and a speaker presentation. Visitors are welcome. For more information, email boeblingen@centex.net or call 817-454-8175).

 

Houston: The Native Plant Society of Texas - Houston (NPSOT-H) meets at 7:30 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month except for October (4th Thursday) and December (2nd Thursday). Location varies. For locations, for more information on programs, and for information about native plants for Houston, visit http://www.npsot.org/Houston.

 

Rosenberg: The Fort Bend Master Gardeners meet at 7 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month except December at the Bud O'Shieles Community Center located at 1330 Band Road, Rosenberg. For more information, call 281-341-7068 or visit www.fbmg.com.

 

Seguin: The Guadalupe County Master Gardeners meets at 6:30 p.m. the third Thursday of each month, at the Justice Center, 211 Court Street, Seguin. After a brief social hour, the meeting and guest speaker begins at 7 p.m. The meeting is free and open to the public. For additional information, call 830-303-3889 or visit www.guadalupecountymastergardeners.org.

 

FOURTH WEEK

 

Brackenridge Park: The Native Plant Society San Antonio Chapter meets every fourth Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. in the Lions Field Adult and Senior Center, 2809 Broadway at E. Mulberry, Brackenridge Park, except August and December. Social and seed/plant exchange at 6:30 p.m. Free and open to the public. For more information, contact Bea at 210-999-7292 or visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio.

 

Bryan: The Brazos County Master Gardeners, a program of Texas AgriLife Extension, meet the fourth Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m. at the Brazos Center, 3232 Briarcrest Drive, Bryan. There is a public gardening program at each meeting and pertinent information may be found at brazosmg.com or 979-823-0129.

 

Edna: The Jackson County Master Gardeners present their "Come Grown With Us" seminars on the fourth Tuesday of each month, January through October, beginning at 7 p.m. at 411 N. Wells, Edna. The seminars are free, open to the public and offer 2 CEU hours to Master Gardeners or others requiring them. For additional information, contact the Jackson County Extension Office at 361-782-3312.

 

Linden: The Caddo Wildflower Chapter of Native Plants Society meets the fourth Tuesday of each month at the senior citizens building at 507 S Kaufman St. in Linden at 6:30. Visitors are welcome. For additional information, contact Karen Tromza at khtromza@yahoo.com.

 

Fort Worth: The Organic Garden Club of Forth Worth meets at 7 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday of each month except July and December at the Deborah Beggs Moncrief Garden Center, 3220 Botanic Blvd., Ft. Worth. Refreshments are served. For more information, call 817-263-9322 or visit www.ogcfw.webs.com.

 

San Antonio: The Native Plant Society of Texas San Antonio Chapter meets the fourth Tuesday of each month, except August and December, at the Lions Field Adult & Senior Center, 2809 Broadway, San Antonio. Social and plant/seed exchange at 6:30 p.m., program at 7:00 p.m. For more information, visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio or call Bea at 210-999-7292.

 

Houston: The Houston Chapter of the Native Prairie Association of Texas (HNPAT) meets from 7 p.m. until 8:30 p.m. the fourth Thursday of each month at 3015 Richmond Ave., Houston. For more information, contact hnpat@prairies.org.

 

Leander: The Leander Garden Club meets on the fourth Thursday of each month (except July and August) at 10:30 a.m. at the community room behind the Greater Texas Federal Credit Union,1300 N. Bell, Cedar Park, unless there is special event planned. Following a program and short business meeting, we share a pot-luck luncheon. To confirm the meeting place and time, please call president Cathy Clark-Ramsey at 512-963-4698 or email info@leandergc.org.

 

Dallas: The Dallas County Master Gardeners meet the fourth Thursday of each month at 11:30 a.m. For location and program information, visit http://www.dallascountymastergardeners.org/ or contact The Helpdesk, M-F, 8 to 4:30 214-904-3053.

 

Dallas: The Greater Dallas Organic Garden Club meets at 7:00 p.m. on the fourth Thursday of each month at the REI, 4515 LBJ Freeway, Dallas. For more information, call 214-824-2448 or visit www.gdogc.org.

  

Arlington: The Arlington Organic Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the last Thursday of each month (except November and December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact David at 817-483-7746.

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