November 13, 2013
  

TFS urges caution to decrease the spread of oak wilt disease

 

Texas A&M Forest Service

 

With the long-anticipated arrival of cooler weather, now is the perfect opportunity to enjoy some time by the campfire but be careful to pay close attention to the firewood you are picking. Transporting and storing diseased wood is a known means of spreading the devastating oak wilt fungus to previously uninfected neighborhoods. Utilizing these prevention steps is the key to safeguarding against spreading the disease through the selection and use of firewood:

Select well-seasoned firewood. Well-seasoned wood is cut before the summer and is typically dry with loose bark and cracked ends. Avoid oak wood that appears unseasoned, that may have tight bark and cut ends which show no cracks or signs of aging. The extreme heat and drying of a full Texas summer effectively destroys the fungus in cut firewood.

 

Safely store unknown sources of firewood. If the oak wood comes from an unknown source and it is not well seasoned, cover the woodpile with a clear piece of plastic. Burying the edges of the plastic will prevent the entry or exit of insects that might have been attracted to diseased wood and fungal mats.

 

Destroy diseased red oaks. A knowledgeable arborist or forester should diagnose red oaks (i.e., Texas red, blackjack or shumard oak) that die rapidly (2-3 weeks) or in groups (2 or more trees over several years) for oak wilt. Trees suspected to have died recently from oak wilt should be destroyed by burning, burying or chipping. The heat of a fire destroys the fungus and the smoke emitted poses no threat to healthy trees. When planning to do any outdoor burning, be sure to check with local officials to see if an outdoor burning ban is in place for your county and take care not to burn on windy days with low humidity.

 

Avoid wounding oaks during vulnerable seasons. The general recommendation is to avoid injuries to oaks from February through June. The best times for pruning of oaks are during the heat of summer (minimal spore production) or the cold of winter (minimal insect activity).

 

Paint all oak wounds including pruning cuts. Throughout the year, immediately apply a thin coat of latex or pruning paint to all fresh wounds and other injuries that expose the inner bark or sapwood of oaks. This prevents contaminated sap beetles from infecting the wound with oak wilt spores.

 

Hunters, especially west of IH 35, should be especially careful in not transporting recently killed oak trees off of ranch land. The probability exists of moving red oaks that have died of oak wilt and having these trees produce disease spores while being stored. If in doubt, again always cover the wood with clear plastic and seal the edges with rocks or soil.

 

Oak firewood is an important commodity to Texans, whether it's used for firing up the barbecue pit or for warming up on a chilly hunter's morning. By selecting well-seasoned, disease-free firewood and by following other disease prevention guidelines, homeowners are taking the correct steps to prevent a new oak wilt disease outbreak in their neighborhood. Visit www.texasoakwilt.org for more information on this devastating tree disease.

 
Tree planting is more than just digging a hole 

 

By Tom Harris, Ph.D.

The Hill Country Gardener  

 

Mother Nature plants trees by just dropping seeds on the ground and they grow. Think you could be that lucky? Don't think so. Remember that a tree puts out literally thousands if not millions of seeds in the hope that one or two will make it on their own and grow up to be just like Mom.

 

The way most of us get trees is to go to the nursery and buy them in pots from one gallon in size to huge ones in 30-40 gallon tubs. The bigger the tree, the bigger the price because the nursery has fed and watered it for years to get it to that size.

 

Any experienced gardener will tell you that planting a tree is not as simple as just digging a hole and plopping the tree in it and then hoping for the best. There is a specific way to plant trees if you want them to grow to their full potential as quickly as possible.

 

When you dig the hole, dig it only as deep as the tub that the tree came in but make it about 2-4 times bigger across than the diameter of the tub.

 

If the tree is small enough, take it out of the tub by turning the tub upside down and whacking it on the bottom to loosen it, and then pull the tree out. Place the tree in the hole to be sure that the soil from the tub is level with the ground around the tree. Next, mix in a little compost or potting soil but no more than 10 percent of the soil that goes back in the whole.

 

The tree needs to get used to the soil it will be growing in so don't add much in the way of amendments.

 

If you'll be using any kind of root stimulator, now is the time to add it. Mix the liquid according to the directions on the container and add it as you fill the hole. You only need to add root stimulator once - when you plant the tree.

 

Next comes the mulch. Put about 2-3 inches of mulch all around and on the little dam that you made, but keep it away from the trunk of the tree about 3-6 inches. The mulch will help hold in moisture, keep weeds down and keeps grass from competing with the tree for nutrients in the ground. In addition, it makes it much easier to mow around the new tree.

 

When you buy a tree, be sure to read the label carefully and determine that the tree will be as big or as small as you want for that special spot in your yard.

 

What about Staking the Tree?

 

You don't necessarily have to stake a new tree if you don't want. If the new tree will be subject to severe winds, then, yes, you should stake it.

 

Put 2-3 stakes round the tree and use rope to secure the tree to the stakes. Don't put anything like wire around the tree that could cut into the bark. That'll kill the tree in a few days. The tree needs to be able to move with the wind a little in order to stiffen the trunk.

 

After about 2-3 months, remove the stakes. If you leave the stakes on too long, the tree becomes hobbled and will never be able to stand on its own.

Top five fertilizing tips

The Family Handyman

 

Just as bears gorge themselves before hibernating, your grass is storing up reserves to make it through the winter and thrive in the spring. After the grass appears brown and dormant, the roots are still hard at work absorbing nutrients and moisture so it is important to give your lawn the proper treatment.

 

To help you prep, The Family Handyman has unveiled the top five fertilizing tips to ensure your lawn has everything it needs for a spring wake-up call full of food, hydrated and free from disease:

 

Fill the spreader in the driveway, not on the lawn. You're sure to spill and kill all of the grass that's overexposed.

 

Read and follow the coverage setting on the bag. You're far better off under-fertilizing than over-fertilizing.

 

Rinse out the spreader after use with a garden hose before putting it away. All of the metal parts will rust and freeze if you don't.

 

Seal partial bags of fertilizer with duct tape and store them in a dry place. Otherwise, you'll have a solid block of fertilizer next time you want to use it.

 

If you've reseeded some areas, cover them with plastic before fertilizing the main lawn so you won't burn the new seedlings.


The compost heap
Coffee grounds, stored tips

"After reading about recycling coffee grounds on plants ('
Austin-based coffee recycling program keeps community well grounded,' Seeds, Nov. 6, 2013)," writes Irene Peterson, "how much coffee grounds do you place in a flower pot and do have to mix it into the soil or can you just put it on top. I save my coffee grounds and  when I have collected a gallon I scatter them on my lawn, don't know if that helps but it beats putting in the trash."

Coffee grounds are acidic and contain up to 2 percent nitrogen (N) so they are a good addition to most Texas soils. If you garden in an area of the state that has alkaline soil (most of the state), we suggest using them as a mild fertilizer organic fertilizer. So a handful or two in a flower pot every month or so should work. Just put them on top for existing plants so you don't disturb the roots and mix into the soil for newly planted containers.  We use them around roses and other flowering perennials with good results. Coffee grounds would be an excellent soil amendment if you were growing blueberries or azaleas since they like an acidic soil. - Chris S. Corby, publisher

  

"Where do I look to read stored tips for the Houston-Galveston area on your site?" asks Robert Condrey. "What type of veggie or flower seeds are good to plant in Nov. and Dec. in containers?"   

 

We publish Activity Checklist in each issue of issue of the magazine that covers gardening tips for different areas of the state but that information is only available to subscribers. We have also published several articles on container gardening. You can find them listed in the index on our home page. Just click on the link at www.texasgardener.com. - Chris S. Corby, publisher 

Gardening tips

 

Cool-season color plants that you can plant now in most of Texas include ornamental cabbage, kale, pansies and violas. In central to southern parts of the state snapdragons, stock, alyssum, dianthus and cyclamen work great provided you cover them in event of a hard freeze.


Have a favorite gardening tip you'd like to share? Texas Gardener's Seeds is seeking brief gardening tips from Texas gardeners to use in future issues. If we publish your tip in Seeds, we will send you a free Texas Gardener 2013 Planning Guide & Calendar. Please send your tips of 50 words or less to the editor at: Gardening Tips. 

Upcoming garden events
 
If you would like your organization's events included in "Upcoming Garden Events" or would like to make a change to a listed event, please contact us at Garden Events. To ensure inclusion in this column, please provide complete details at least three weeks prior to the event.

NOVEMBER

 

New Braunfels: Melissa Guerra, an 8th generation Texan: self taught culinary expert with expertise in native medicinal plants both Mexican and Southwest, will visit the San Antonio Herb Society, Thursday, November 14, 6:30-8:30 p.m. at San Antonio Garden Center, 3310 N. New Braunfels. As a food historian, she specializes in the food ways of the American continent, especially Texas regional, Mexican, and Latin American cuisine. She also hosts a cooking show on KLRN. Learn from people who know the most about herb gardening, cooking, sniffing, crafting and infusing...anything and everything is herbal for this meeting! For more information, visit www.sanantonioherbs.org.

  

San Antonio: Backyard Basics: Gifts from the Kitchen. Interested in giving homemade treats as presents this year, or looking for ideas? Here's a solution. Connie Sheppard, County Extension Agent, presents this workshop for $30 per person and each participant will leave with goodies! Thursday, November 14, 1:30 p.m. - 4 p.m. at the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Office, 3355 Cherry Ridge, Suite 208, San Antonio. For easy registration online: https://agriliferegister.tamu.edu/backyardbasics or you may call the extension office at (210) 467-6575 for more information.

 

San Antonio: Green Spaces Alliance will present their final Work(ing)shop of 2013 on Saturday November 16, 9 a.m. - noon., a sneak peek into what it means to practice permaculture in an urban setting. You will learn techniques that are easily applied on a small scale; in your own backyard, front yard, community garden, school garden or public right of way! You may be surprised at what permaculture methods you've already adopted based on your instincts and observations of the natural world. By the end of the workshop you will: Take a walk via video through two urban permaculture landscapes with permaculture designer Jeff Lawton. Learn how to make important observations that will effective the design of a landscape with Austin based landscape designer Adams Kirkpatrick. See the potential for fruit trees in an urban setting. Learn how to care for your fruit trees using organic techniques with BioMundo's Rosina Newton. Assist Nadia Gaona with the implementation of a keyhole garden at the eclectic Roots of Change Community Garden. As always, Green Spaces Work(ing)shops are interactive and active; You may get dirty! Please come equipped to join in the gardening fun but remember to bring a chair for the video and lecture portion of our event. Design and Maintenance-Permaculture Style! will take place at Roots of Change Community Garden, 1416 E Commerce St, San Antonio. $25 for non-members of GSA / $15 for GSA members. Send any requests for sliding scale fees or scholarships to info@greensatx.org. For registration and more event information, visit www.greensatx.org.

 

Houston: Harris County Master Gardeners will host Open Garden Day from 8:30 a.m. until 11 a.m., Monday, November 18, at their Genoa Friendship Garden, 1202 Genoa Red Bluff Road, Houston. "Overwintering Tropicals" will be presented at 9:30 a.m. Master Gardeners will be on hand to answer gardening questions. This event is free and open to the public. For additional information, visit http://hcmga.tamu.edu or call 281-855-5600. 

  

Bandera: Seeds contributor Tom Harris, Ph.D., will lead "Build Your Own Drip Irrigation System," November 19, 6:30-8:30 p.m., at the Northside Learning Center, Bandera. For registration information, contact Susan Underwood at www.nisd.net/ace.


San Antonio: Backyard Basics: Growing Plants Happily and Successfully Indoors will be presented on Tuesday, November 19 from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., $10 per person. Learn how to create indoor environments using house plants. Presented by Romell Henze, Master Gardener, at 3355 Cherry Ridge, Suite 208, San Antonio. Call (210) 467-6575 for information, or register online at https://agriliferegister.tamu.edu/backyardbasics.

   

La Marque: At the "Texas Upper Gulf Coast Citrus Show" Thursday, November 21, 6:30-7 p.m., at Galveston County AgriLife Extension Office in Carbide Park, 4102 Main Street (FM 519), La Marque citrus grown by local gardeners will be on display for the general public. Rosettes and ribbons will be awarded to the best quality entries. Home citrus growers are encouraged to enter any type of citrus fruit for judging. Details, including dates and times for entry submission will be available at http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/ Call 281-534-3413, ext. 12, or email GALV3@wt.net for additional information.

 

La Marque: As a continuation of the Citrus show, Monte L. Nesbitt, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Program Specialist, will present "Citrus for Texas Upper Gulf Coast" Thursday, November 21, 7-8 p.m. at Galveston County AgriLife Extension Office in Carbide Park, 4102 Main Street (FM 519), La Marque The course will cover the topics of citrus variety selection and establishment, production, pest problems, and an update on Citrus Greening and other serious threats. (Pre-registration for this program is not necessary.) For course reservations, call 281-534-3413, ext. 12 or email GALV3@wt.net.

 

San Antonio: BCMG General Meeting, Thursday, November 21, from 6 - 8 p.m. at the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Office, 3355 Cherry Ridge, Suite 208, San Antonio. The meeting is free and open to the public. Stephanie Jones will present "Learn Creative Ways to Make Decorations for the Home from the Garden." For more information contact Lisa Nixon at (210) 364-7844 or email lisa.nixon@bexarcountymastergardeners.org.

 

Seguin: Backyard Basics: Gifts from the Kitchen. Interested in giving homemade treats as presents this year, or looking for ideas? Here's a solution. Charla Bading, County Extension Agent, presents this workshop for $30 per person and each participant will leave with goodies! Thursday, November 21, 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. at the Texas Agricultural Education & Heritage Center (Red Barn), 390 Cordova Rd. For easy registration online: https://agriliferegister.tamu.edu/backyardbasics.

 

Seguin: The Guadalupe Master Gardeners will meet on Thursday, November 21, at the Justice Center, 211 Court Street, Seguin. The meeting will start at 7 p.m. Paul Johnson, of the Texas Parks & Wildlife, will talk about "Proper Tree Pruning." The meeting is free and open to the public. The regular business meeting will be at the end of the program. For further information visit www.guadalupecountymastergardeners.org or call 830-303-3889.

 

DECEMBER

 

Humble: Casey Scribner and Brooke Judice of Trees for Houston will present "Trees in Urban Areas" noon-2 p.m., Wednesday, December 11, at Mercer Arboretum & Botanic, located one mile north of FM 1960 at 22306 Aldine Westfield Road, Humble. Scribner and Judice will offer information about the importance of trees in an urban environment, recommended trees for our area, plus tips for how to plant and take care of them. For more information, call 281-443-8731 or visit www.hcp4.net/mercer.

 

MARCH

 

Jacksonville: The Cherokee County Master Gardener Association will hold their annual Spring Conference March 8. The conference will be held at the First Christian Church Fellowship Hall, 1920 Beaumont Street, Jacksonville. Registration will begin at 8:30 a.m. and the first speaker will be at 9 a.m. There will be a $10.00 fee which includes drinks, refreshments and a chance to win one of four door prizes. The program will feature three well known respected speakers. Greg Grant is Lecturer in the School of Horticulture at Stephen F. Austin State University. He was formerly the Cherokee County Horticulturist with the Texas Cooperative Extension in Rusk. He is also co-author, with William C. Welch, of the book Southern Heirloom Garden, and he is a columnist for Texas Gardener magazine. He has traveled extensively to botanical and public gardens throughout the United States and Europe and is a popular public speaker in the southern United States. Dave Whitinger is the creator of several large and popular websites, most notably Dave's Garden and All Things Plants. He moved to Cherokee County in late 2007 and lives just outside Jacksonville with his wife and 6 children. They have a homestead with extensive gardens, cows, chickens, and various other domestic animals. In addition to being a member of the Cherokee County Master Gardeners, Dave is also a software programmer whose passion is to bring gardeners together and provide them with custom made software tools that both serve gardeners as well as take online gardening to the next level. Keith Hansen has been the Texas AgriLife Horticulturist for Smith County since 1992. Prior to that, he was the extension agent for Nueches County. Keith has a weekly column, "Keeping it Green," in the Tyler Morning Telegraph and has written numerous articles for other publications. For more information, contact Ginny Scurlock at 903-530-8610 or at ginnyscurlock@yahoo.com.

 

Monthly meetings

 

If you would like your organization's events included in "Monthly Meetings" or would like to make a change to a listed meeting, please contact us at Monthly Meetings. To ensure inclusion in this column, please provide complete details. 

 

FIRST WEEK

 

Houston: The Harris County Master Gardeners meet at noon the first Tuesday of each month at the Texas AgriLife Extension, 3033 Bear Creek Drive (near the intersection of Highway 6 and Patterson Road), Houston. For additional information visit http://hcmga.tamu.edu or call 281-855-5600.

 

Wichita Falls: The Wichita County Master Gardener Association meets at 5:30 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 600 Scott Street, Wichita Falls, on the first Tuesday of each month. For more information, visit www.txmg.org/wichita or call 940-716-8610.

 

Kilgore: Northeast Texas Organic Gardeners meets at 1 p.m. on the first Wednesday of each month. For more information, call Carole Ramke at 903-986-9475.

 

Midland: The Permian Basin Master Gardeners meet at noon, the first Wednesday of each month at the Permian Basin Readiness Center at the Midland International Airport. For more information, call 432-498-4071.

 

New Braunfels: The Comal Master Gardeners meet at 6 p.m. the first Wednesday of each month (except December) at the GVTC Auditorium, 36101 FM 3159, New Braunfels. An educational program preceeds the business meeting. The public is invited to attend. For additional information, call 830-620-3440 or visit http://txmg.org/comal/.

 

Allen: The Allen Garden Club meets at 7 p.m. on the first Thursday of each month, February through December, at the Allen Heritage Center, 100 E. Main St., Allen. For more information, visit www.allengardenclub.org.

 

Brownwood: The Brown County Master Gardeners Association meets the first Thursday of each month from noon to 1 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 605 Fisk Ave., Brownwood. For further information, call Mary Green Engle at 325-784-8453.

 

Gonzalas: Gonzales Master Gardeners hold their monthly meeting at noon on the first Thursday of each month at 623 Fair Street, Gonzales. Bring a bag lunch, drinks provided. Contact AgriLife Extension Office at 830-672-8531 or visit http://gonzalesmastergardeners.org for more information.

 

SECOND WEEK

 

Austin: Austin Organic Gardeners Club meets at 6:30 p.m. on the second Monday of each month (except December) at the Austin Area Garden Center, 2220 Barton Springs Road, Zilker Botanical Gardens in Austin. For more information, visit www.austinorganicgardeners.org.

 

Evant: The Evant Garden Club meets on the second Tuesday of each month at 10 a.m., usually at the bank in downtown Evant. To confirm the date, time and place of each month's meeting, call 254-471-5585.

 

Marion: The Guadalupe County (Schertz/Seguin) Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets on the second Tuesday of each month except July, August and December at St. John's Lutheran Church in Marion. Directions to St. John's Lutheran Church: From FM 78 turn south onto FM 465 and the church is just past the Marion School on the right. From IH-10 go north on FM 465 towards Marion. The Church will be on the left, just before you get to town. A plant exchange and meet-and-greet begins at 6:30 p.m. followed by the program at 7 p.m. Visitors are welcome. For more information or an application to join NPSOT visit www.npsot.org/GuadalupeCounty/ or contact guadalupecounty@npsot.org.

 

Quitman: The Quitman Garden Club meets at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month at the Quitman Library on E Goode Street, Quitman. It is a diverse group that welcomes all visitors. For more information, e-mail quitmangardenclub@gmail.com.

 

Denton: The Denton County Master Gardener Association meets from 9:30 a.m. until 11 a.m. the second Wednesday of each month at 401 W. Hickory St., Denton. Meetings are open to the public. More information is available at: http://dcmga.com/.

 

Humble: The Mercer Arboretum & Botanic Garden, 22306 Aldine Westfield Road, Humble, hosts a Lunch Bunch the second Wednesday of each month from noon until 2 p.m. Take a sack lunch or order a box lunch from Starbucks when you call 281-443-8731 to reserve your spot. Master Gardeners and Masters Naturalists may earn CEU credits by attending.

 

Jacksboro: The Jacksboro Garden Club meets at 9:30 a.m. the second Wednesday of each month (except June, July and August) at the Concerned Citizens Center, 400 East Pine Street, Jacksboro. For more information, call Melinda at 940-567-6218.

 

Longview: The Gregg County Master Gardeners Association meets the second Wednesday of each month from noon to 1 p.m. at the AgriLife Extension Office, 405 E. Marshall Ave., Longview. The public is invited to attend. There is an educational program preceding the business meeting. For further information call Cindy Gill at 903-236-8429 or visit www.gregg-tx.tamu.edu.

 

Rockport: The Rockport Herb & Rose Study Group, founded in March 2003, meets the second  

Wednesday of each month at 10 a.m. at 619 N. Live Oak Street, Room 14, Rockport, to discuss all aspects of using and growing herbs, including historical uses and tips for successful propagation and cultivation. Sometimes they take field trips and have cooking demonstrations in different locations. For more information, contact Linda 361-729-6037, Ruth 361-729-8923 or Cindy 979-562-2153 or visit www.rockportherbs.org and http://rockportherbies.blogspot.com.

 

Woodway: The McLennan County Master Gardeners meet on the second Wednesday each month at noon at the Carleen Bright Arboretum, 9001 Bosque Blvd., Woodway. Educational programs follow the business session. For more information, call 254-757-5180.

 

Beaumont: The Jefferson County Master Gardeners meet at 7 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the AgriLife Extension Office, 1225 Pearl Street, Suite 200, Beaumont. For more information, call 409-835-8461.

 

Georgetown: The Williamson County Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the Georgetown Public Library, 402 W. 8th Street. Georgetown. For additional information, contract Billye Adams at 512-863-9636 or visit http://www.npsot.org/WilliamsonCounty/default.htm.

 

Orange: The Orange County Master Gardeners Association holds their monthly meeting on the second Thursday of each month. A short program is presented. The meeting starts at 6:30 p.m. at the new Orange County Expo Center on Hwy 1442 in Orangefield. Enter the building in the front entrance, first door on the right, Texas AgriLife offices. Pot luck supper at 6 p.m. Visit http://txmg.org/orange for more information.

 

San Antonio: The San Antonio Herb Society meets at 7 p.m. on the second Thursday of each month at the San Antonio Garden Center, 3310 N. New Braunfels (corner of Funston & N. New Braunfels). For more information on programs, visit www.sanantonioherbs.org.

 

Angleton: The Brazoria County Master Gardeners meet at 11 a.m. on the second Friday of each month at the Brazoria County Extension Office, 21017 County Road 171, Angleton. There is a general business meeting followed by a brief educational program each month. For further information call 979-864-1558, ext.110.

 

College Station: The A&M Garden Club meets on the second Friday of each month during the school year at 9:30 a.m. in the training room of the College Station Waste Water Facility building at the end of North Forest Parkway, College Station. Expert speakers, plant sharing, and federated club projects help members learn about gardening in the Brazos Valley, floral design, conservation, and more. For more information, visit http://www.amgardenclub.com/.

 

Houston: The Spring Branch African Violet Club meets the second Saturday of each month, January through November, at 10:30am at the Copperfield Baptist Church, 8350 Highway 6 North, Houston. Call Karla at 281-748-8417 prior to attending to confirm meeting date and time.

 

Dallas: The Rainbow Garden Club of North Texas meets the second Sunday of each month at 2 p.m. Everyone is welcome. Meetings are held at member's homes and garden centers around the area. For more information, visit www.RainbowGardenClub.com.

 

THIRD WEEK

 

Arlington: The Arlington Men's Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the third Monday of each month (except December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact Lance Jepson at LJepson@aol.com.

 

Cleburne: The Johnson County Master Gardeners meet at 2 p.m. on the third Monday of each month at McGregor House, 1628 W. Henderson, Cleburne, which includes a program and a meet & greet. For more information, call Sharon Smith at 817-894-7700.

 

Corpus Christi: The Nueces Master Gardeners meet at noon the third Tuesday of each month, except December, at Garden Senior Center, 5325 Greely Dr., Corpus Christi. An educational program precedes the business meeting. For further information call 361 767-5217.

 

Rockport: Monthly meetings of the Aransas/San Patricio Master Gardeners are held at 10 a.m. on the third Tuesday of each month at Texas AgriLife Extension Service - Aransas County Office, 892 Airport Rd., Rockport. For additional information, e-mail aransas-tx@tamu.edu or call 361-790-0103.

 

Sugar Land: The Sugar Land Garden Club meets on the third Tuesday of each month, September through Novemberand January through April at 10 a.m. at the Sugar Land Community Center, 226 Matlage Way, Sugar Land. The club hosts a different speaker each month. For more information, visit www.sugarlandgardenclub.org.

 

Denton: The Denton Organic Society, a group devoted to sharing information and educating the public regarding organic principles, meets the third Wednesday of each month (except July, August and December) at the Denton Senior Center, 509 N. Bell Avenue. Meetings are free and open to the public. Meetings begin at 7 p.m. and are preceded by a social at 6:30. For more information, call 940-382-8551.

 

Glen Rose: The Somervell County Master Gardeners meet at 10 a.m., the third Wednesday of each month at the Somervell County AgriLife Extension office, 1405 Texas Drive, Glen Rose. Visitors are welcome. For more information, call 254-897-2809 or visit www.somervellmastergardeners.org.

 

Granbury: The Lake Granbury Master Gardeners meet at 1 p.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at the Hood County Annex 1, 1410 West Pearl Street, Granbury. The public is invited to attend. There is an educational program each month preceding the business meeting. For information on topics call 817-579-3280 or visit http://www.hoodcountymastergardeners.org/.

 

Seabrook: The Harris County Precinct 2 Master Gardeners hold an educational program at 10 a.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at The Meeting Room at Clear Lake Park (on the Lakeside), 5001 NASA Road 1, Seabrook. The programs are free and open to the public. For more information, visit http://hcmgap2.tamu.edu.

 

Brownwood: Brownwood Garden Club meets the third Thursday of each month, 11:30 a.m.- 1 p.m.  The club meetings are at Southside Baptist Church, 1219 Indian Creek Road, with refreshments and a speaker presentation. Visitors are welcome. For more information, email boeblingen@centex.net or call 817-454-8175).

 

Houston: The Native Plant Society of Texas - Houston (NPSOT-H) meets at 7:30 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month except for October (4th Thursday) and December (2nd Thursday). Location varies. For locations, for more information on programs, and for information about native plants for Houston, visit http://www.npsot.org/Houston.

 

Rosenberg: The Fort Bend Master Gardeners meet at 7 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month except December at the Bud O'Shieles Community Center located at 1330 Band Road, Rosenberg. For more information, call 281-341-7068 or visit www.fbmg.com.

 

Seguin: The Guadalupe County Master Gardeners meets at 6:30 p.m. the third Thursday of each month, at the Justice Center, 211 Court Street, Seguin. After a brief social hour, the meeting and guest speaker begins at 7 p.m. The meeting is free and open to the public. For additional information, call 830-303-3889 or visit www.guadalupecountymastergardeners.org.

 

FOURTH WEEK

 

Brackenridge Park: The Native Plant Society San Antonio Chapter meets every fourth Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. in the Lions Field Adult and Senior Center, 2809 Broadway at E. Mulberry, Brackenridge Park, except August and December. Social and seed/plant exchange at 6:30 p.m. Free and open to the public. For more information, contact Bea at 210-999-7292 or visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio.

 

Bryan: The Brazos County Master Gardeners, a program of Texas AgriLife Extension, meet the fourth Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m. at the Brazos Center, 3232 Briarcrest Drive, Bryan. There is a public gardening program at each meeting and pertinent information may be found at brazosmg.com or 979-823-0129.

 

Edna: The Jackson County Master Gardeners present their "Come Grown With Us" seminars on the fourth Tuesday of each month, January through October, beginning at 7 p.m. at 411 N. Wells, Edna. The seminars are free, open to the public and offer 2 CEU hours to Master Gardeners or others requiring them. For additional information, contact the Jackson County Extension Office at 361-782-3312.

 

Linden: The Caddo Wildflower Chapter of Native Plants Society meets the fourth Tuesday of each month at the senior citizens building at 507 S Kaufman St. in Linden at 6:30. Visitors are welcome. For additional information, contact Karen Tromza at khtromza@yahoo.com.

 

Fort Worth: The Organic Garden Club of Forth Worth meets at 7 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday of each month except July and December at the Deborah Beggs Moncrief Garden Center, 3220 Botanic Blvd., Ft. Worth. Refreshments are served. For more information, call 817-263-9322 or visit www.ogcfw.webs.com.

 

San Antonio: The Native Plant Society of Texas San Antonio Chapter meets the fourth Tuesday of each month, except August and December, at the Lions Field Adult & Senior Center, 2809 Broadway, San Antonio. Social and plant/seed exchange at 6:30 p.m., program at 7:00 p.m. For more information, visit www.npsot.org/sanantonio or call Bea at 210-999-7292.

 

Houston: The Houston Chapter of the Native Prairie Association of Texas (HNPAT) meets from 7 p.m. until 8:30 p.m. the fourth Wednesday of each month at Bayland Park Community Center, 6400 Bissonnet, Houston. For more information, contact hnpat@prairies.org.

 

Leander: The Leander Garden Club meets on the fourth Thursday of each month (except July and August) at 10:30 a.m. at the community room behind the Greater Texas Federal Credit Union,1300 N. Bell, Cedar Park, unless there is special event planned. Following a program and short business meeting, we share a pot-luck luncheon. To confirm the meeting place and time, please call president Cathy Clark-Ramsey at 512-963-4698 or email info@leandergc.org.

 

Dallas: The Dallas County Master Gardeners meet the fourth Thursday of each month at 11:30 a.m. For location and program information, visit http://www.dallascountymastergardeners.org/ or contact The Helpdesk, M-F, 8 to 4:30 214-904-3053.

 

Dallas: The Greater Dallas Organic Garden Club meets at 7:00 p.m. on the fourth Thursday of each month at the REI, 4515 LBJ Freeway, Dallas. For more information, call 214-824-2448 or visit www.gdogc.org.

  

Arlington: The Arlington Organic Garden Club meets from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. on the last Thursday of each month (except November and December) at the Bob Duncan Center, 2800 S. Center Street, Arlington. For more information, contact David at 817-483-7746.


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Finally, back by popular demand and in its fourth printing, the most informative and comprehensive "how-to" book on vegetable gardening in Texas (also, suitable for most other areas of the South) written by the late, great Dr. Sam Cotner, former head of horticulture at Texas A&M University and lifelong gardener. This interesting read has over 370 pages of detailed information on every crop, from Asparagus to Watermelon including problem/solving sections for each vegetable. If you want to maximize your enjoyment and success growing vegetables in Texas, this book is a "must have," whether you are a beginner or a seasoned gardener. Price $34.02


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Texas Gardener's Seeds is published weekly. Suntex Communications, Inc. 2013. All rights reserved. You may forward this publication to your friends and colleagues if it is sent in its entirety. No individual part of this newsletter may be reproduced in any manner without prior written permission from the publisher.

 

Missed an issue? Back issues of Texas Gardener's Seeds April 2006-September 2013 are available at www.texasgardener.com/newsletters. Back issues beginning October 2013 are available here

 

Publisher: Chris S. Corby ● Editor: Michael Bracken 

 

Texas Gardener's Seeds, P.O. Box 9005, Waco, Texas 76714

www.TexasGardener.com