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CAMWS Newsletter



The Classical Association of the Middle West and South
Fall
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In This Issue
A Note from Our President
News from the Secretary-Treasurer
Photo Highlights from CAMWS-Southern Section
Article Headline
Article Headline
New in The Classical Journal
New in Teaching Classical Languages
News from the Committee for the Promotion of Latin
Article Headline
Article Headline
Article Headline
Sneek Peek: Panels and Workshops Approved for the Boulder Meeting
CAMWS Contributors List
CAMWS Committee Lists
CAMWS Vice-President Lists
Membership Information
Classics in the News
Obitus Recentes
Corrigendum
Submissions
Quick Links
A Note From President Ruth Scodel 

 

Dear Colleagues,

 

I hope that your autumns are all as beautiful as mine has been (I certainly never expected that stopping for gas on I-94 would bring me close to migrating sandhill cranes!) but somewhat less pressed (fortunam ex aliis, as it were).   My appeal for individual abstracts for the Boulder meeting has brought a record number, but as the Program Committee works away it does not immediately appear that higher quantity means lower quality. There may be more rejections than usual, but there will also be more sessions. Since we don't have a special plenary session, there will probably be papers on Thursday night, to be followed by a reception-with drinks tickets distributed at the paper sessions. Boulder should be a lot of fun-though I'd better warn you that it's a non-smoking hotel and it isn't legal to smoke pot in the park, so anyone planning on marijuana tourism should either have local friends or plan on edibles. Please, though, be as alert as possible for the papers. I'm even hoping that my Presidential address will be worth hearing in a clear state of mind. It is tentatively called "Lacrimae Rerum?"

 

The Executive Committee has been busy, too. We have been approving committee charters briskly, so in the future it will be simple to see exactly what we do. And we have also voted to approve a number of increases in our awards, along with the expansion of the translation exams. We are increasing the Semple Award, the Bolchazy Pedagogy Award, and the Stewart Travel Awards, and instituting a second field school award for undergraduates. We've also modified/clarified some eligibility issues. These awards are central to the mission of CAMWS, and we want them to be as useful as possible to the recipients-and we want applications. Everyone should look at the website and think about whether to apply for one or to suggest an application to a colleague or student (and if the colleague or student isn't a CAMWS member, the awards are a reason to become one).

 

Back to the abstracts!

 

Ruth Scodel

University of Michigan

President, CAMWS  

 

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News From Secretary-Treasurer Tom Sienkewicz


Dear Colleagues,

 

I just returned from a great CAMWS Southern Section meeting in Fredericksburg, Virginia,  where we were hosted in regal fashion by the University of Mary Washington and the National Latin Exam. As usual, Davina McClain managed to pull together, almost single-handedly, an excellent program. Frankly, I don't know how she does it. Our Classics colleagues at the University of Mary Washington, and Liane Houghtalin in particular, deserve special recognition for being such good hosts, along with the folks at the National Latin Exam, especially Linda Montross and Mark Keith.  Optime factum! I heard many excellent papers, including some by graduate and undergraduate students, but the highlight for me was the cake celebrating the 100th anniversary of Eta Sigma Phi, the national undergraduate Classics honorary society.

 

As you probably are aware by now, the CAMWS website (camws.org) now has a new look created by Drupal, a user-friendly Content Management System (CMS), which has enabled us to enhance, we hope, the visual appearance and usability of the site. It is now also much easier for us to edit the site from the CAMWS office. New features include a "Featured CAMWS Member" notice and current plans are to add, in the near future, an RSS feed to the site. If you have any suggestions about ways to improve the site, please do not hesitate to let me know.

 

The transition to the new website has not been without its complications and challenges, and Jevanie Gillen and I are very grateful to you for your patience as we worked out the rough spots. The CAMWS office has been especially busy this fall in processing a record number of 481 individual abstracts for the 2015 meeting in Boulder! (The previous record was 387 for Iowa City in 2013.) The Program Committee will probably announce its decisions for 2015 sometime before Thanksgiving. To whet your appetite about the 2015 meeting, however, you will find elsewhere in this newsletter a list of the panels and workshops already approved for the Boulder meeting. The Local Committee is planning to host us well on our Friday visit to the University of Colorado. We will have the campus to ourselves that day since the university will be on spring break. I can also tell you that the convention room rate at the Millennium Harvest House Hotel will be $129 for single and $139 for a double, including a full breakfast buffet and complimentary guest room internet. So mark your calendars for March 25-28, 2015, in Boulder. I hope to see you there.

 

Tom Sienkewicz

CAMWS Secretary-Treasurer

 

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Photo Highlights from the CAMWS-SS Meeting in Fredericksburg, VA 

T. Davina McClain (Secretary-Treasurer, CAMWS-SS) and Herbert W. Benario (Emory University, emeritus) at the banquet
Eta Sigma Phi celebrates 100 years
Jennifer Ranck (Hunter College), David Sick (Executive Secretary of Eta Sigma Phi, Rhodes College) and Emma Vanderpool (Monmouth College)

Emma and Jennifer cutting the cake, with Mary Pendergraft (Wake Forest University)

Julie Langford (University of South Florida), Vice President of CAMWS-SS, and Laura Hatmaker (McLean School), recipient of one of the Stewart Travel Awards from CAMWS.  The other winners (not pictured) were Emily Master (Princeton University) and Laura Brook Rich (University of Texas at Austin).
John Marincola (Florida State University), President of CAMWS-SS, with Kathryn Langenfeld (Duke University), winner of the CAMWS-SS President's Award for best Graduate Student Paper.



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CAMWS Awards & Scholarship Information
CPL Award for Outstanding Promotional Activity

To support programs and activities in primary and secondary schools, the CAMWS Committee for the Promotion of Latin (CPL) annually recognizes with a plaque and a certificate the group which develops the most outstanding and effective activity for promoting Latin in CAMWS territory during each academic year (including the preceding summer). The winner of this award is announced every spring at the annual CAMWS meeting.

 

Projects supported by CPL grants are automatically eligible for this award.

 

Any other group wishing to compete for this award must be sponsored by a current CAMWS member and must submit a letter of application to the CPL chair at cpl@camws.org by February 28, 2015. The application letter must include a 100-word summary of the project and a more detailed project description not to exceed 500 words in length. Applicants are encouraged to attach supporting materials such as photographs, flyers, pertinent newspaper articles, etc.

 

For more information go to https://camws.org/cpl/awards/promtional.php.   

 

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CAMWS Excavation/Field School Award

The Classical Association of the Middle West and South annually awards two $2000.00 scholarships for participation in summer excavation or fieldschool at an archaeological site in the Greco-Roman world. Generally, one award will be made to a graduate student and another to an undergraduate, but teachers are also eligible for this award.

 

To be eligible for this award, one must be a current member of CAMWS who either:

  • holds a teaching position in Greek or Latin in an elementary, secondary school or university within CAMWS territory; or
  • is enrolled as an undergraduate or graduate student in a degree-granting Classics program within CAMWS territory.

Priority for the award will be given to applicants who have not had previous excavation experience in the Greco-Roman world.

 

To apply for the 2014-2015 award this On-line Application Form must be received by Friday, January 30, 2015.  

 

Note: An individual who wins this archaeology fieldwork award cannot also receive a Semple, Grant Award or Benario Award from CAMWS in the same year.

Please note that an individual cannot accept this award from CAMWS if he or she receives another award or scholarship for this fieldschool and the combined amount of these awards would be more than the cost of the fieldschool.

 

For further information, contact the chair of the Subcommittee on the Excavation and Field School Award at archaeology@camws.org and visit https://camws.org/awards/excavation.php.   

 

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Manson A. Stewart Undergraduate Award

 

Teachers of undergraduate students should remember to nominate their most outstanding young Classicists for the 2014-2015 CAMWS Manson Stewart Undergraduate Award. Every year CAMWS makes $1,000.00 awards to a limited number of undergraduate students majoring in Classics at the sophomore or junior level at a CAMWS college or university. Nominees are expected to take a minimum of two courses in Latin or Greek (normally at least one per quarter or semester) during the junior or senior year in which the award is made.  

 

Students are to be nominated by a department or program; no institution may nominate more than two students per year. The individual who fills out the nomination form on behalf of the department must be an individual member of CAMWS. Each nominee must fill out an application form, write a brief essay, and submit a college or university transcript and two letters of recommendation. Those who write the two letters of recommendations do not need to be CAMWS members. Applicants will indicate on their application the academic purpose for which they intend to use this award money (e.g., tuition, books, academic travel, etc.).

 

CAMWS is now accepting nominations and applications for the 2014-2015 Manson A. Stewart Awards. All nominations must be received by Friday, January 9, 2015

Teachers of undergraduate students should remember to nominate their most outstanding young Classicists for the 2014-2015 CAMWS Manson Stewart Undergraduate Award. Every year CAMWS makes $1,000.00 awards to a limited number of undergraduate students majoring in Classics at the sophomore or junior level at a CAMWS college or university. Nominees are expected to take a minimum of two courses in Latin or Greek (normally at least one per quarter or semester) during the junior or senior year in which the award is made.

 

Students are to be nominated by a department or program; no institution may nominate more than two students per year. The individual who fills out the nomination form on behalf of the department must be an individual member of CAMWS. Each nominee must fill out an application form, write a brief essay, and submit a college or university transcript and two letters of recommendation. Those who write the two letters of recommendations do not need to be CAMWS members. Applicants will indicate on their application the academic purpose for which they intend to use this award money (e.g., tuition, books, academic travel, etc.).

 

CAMWS is now accepting nominations and applications for the 2014-2015 Manson A. Stewart Awards. All nominations must be received by Friday, January 9, 2015.  If you represent a department wishing to nominate a student, you can do so by completing this on-line nomination form.   

 

Applications must be received on-line by Friday, January 30, 2015.

 

If you have any questions, please contact the chair of the Manson Stewart Undergraduate Award Committee at mascollege@camws.org.

 

The recipients of this award are announced at the annual business meeting.

 

For more information, go to https://camws.org/awards/MAScollege.php.

Manson A. Stewart Teacher Training and Travel Awards 

The Classical Association of the Middle West and South sponsors two Manson A. Stewart Awards for primary-, middle-, and secondary-school teachers, as well as graduate and undergraduate students.  Recipients must be members of CAMWS.

 

Teacher Training Awards: Designed to provide some financial assistance to those who wish to obtain certification to teach Latin at the primary through the secondary level, whether the specific courses are needed in Latin or in Education. The award is not intended to cover all costs of the training, and the size of the award varies according to the actual costs (primarily tuition and travel), the size of the committee's budget, and the number of applications. Previous awards have been as high as $2050. To apply for a Teacher Training award, please fill out this on-line application. The deadline for applications is Friday, January 30, 2015.
 
Travel Awards: Designed primarily to assist K-12 teachers with cash awards to offset the costs of attending CAMWS meetings, including the cost of a substitute teacher. Graduate students are also eligible for these award as well as undergraduates preparing for a teaching career. The award is not intended to cover all costs of the travel, and the size of the award varies according to the actual costs the travel will entail, the size of the committee's budget, and the number of applications. Awards for travel to annual meetings have ranged from $300 to $700; for travel to the Southern Section meeting, somewhat less. To apply for a Travel Award, please fill out this on-line application.

 

Deadline for grant applications to attend CAMWS-SS 2014 in Fredericksburg, VA is Monday, September 15, 2014.

 

Deadline for grant applications to attend the 2015 CAMWS meeting in Boulder, is  Friday, January 30, 2015.

 

For questions about these awards, please contact the chair of the Subcommmittee for the Manson Stewart Teacher Training and Travel Awards, at stewartteacher@camws.org.

 

The recipients of this award are announced at the annual business meeting.

 

For more information, go to https://camws.org/awards/MASteach.php.

Presidential Award for Outstanding Graduate Student Paper

Beginning in 1996 the Executive Committee of CAMWS authorized a new prize, the Presidential Award for the Outstanding Graduate Student Paper at the Annual Meeting. Eligible are graduate students whose paper is accepted on the program and who will not have received their Ph.D. by the time it is read. The text of the oral talk is submitted at least one month in advance of the meeting and an ad hoc committee selects the winner. The award (with a prize of $200) is presented at the annual business meeting, even though the winner may not yet have read it by the time of the meeting.

 

There are two criteria for evaluation: (1) the quality of the scholarly argument, including the importance of the topic, the originality of the treatment, and the quality of mind displayed; (2) the effectiveness of an oral presentation, including the quality of the writing, good organization, and interest to an audience. Any graduate student whose abstract has been accepted by the program committee may submit a complete text of the paper for consideration for this award.

 

Those wishing to be considered for this award at the 2014 meeting in Waco should submit their completed paper electronically to President Ruth Scodel at president@camws.org by Friday, January 30, 2015.

 

For more information, go to https://camws.org/awards/pres.php.   

 

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CAMWS Latin Translation Contest

The CAMWS Sight Translation Exams administered by the Sub-Committee on School Awards have been expanded to include not only the traditional advanced translation exam but also an intermediate one as well. In addition, both exams are open not only to high school students but also to college/university students.  CAMWS offers cash prizes, book awards, and awards of commendation to qualifying winners in all of these exams.

 

 For further information or to register your students go to either High School Translation Exam or College/University Exam.

 

Application Deadline is Friday, November 14, 2014. Winners will be announced in February 2015.

 

All questions about this contest should be directed to Robert White, the Chair of the Subcommittee at schoolawards@camws.org.

 

For more information, go to https://camws.org/awards/school.php.

Semple, Grant, and Benario Awards

These three awards offer graduate students and teachers of Classics (Greek, Latin, Classical Art & Archaeology and Ancient History) at the pre-collegiate (primary, secondary, or high school) level the opportunity to advance research and/or pedagogical interests abroad in Athens, Rome, or other appropriate ancient site.

 

The Semple Award is a $4,500 fellowship for attending the summer session of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens.

 

The Mary A. Grant Award is a $5,000 fellowship for attending the summer session of the American Academy in Rome.

 

The Janice and Herbert Benario Award is a $3,000 fellowship that the recipient may apply to the summer travel (not fieldwork) program of his or her choice.

 

To be eligible for a Semple, Grant, or Benario Award, one must be a current member of CAMWS who either:

  • holds a teaching position in Greek or Latin in an elementary or secondary school within CAMWS territory (camws.org/about/map.php); or
  • is enrolled as a graduate student in a degree-granting Classics program within CAMWS territory (camws.org/about/map.php).

Priority for the Benario Award will be given to applicants interested in summer programs other than those of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens and the American Academy in Rome, which are normally funded by the Semple and Grant Awards.

 

An individual who wins a Semple Award or a Grant Award may not receive a Benario Award in the same year.

 

Please note that an individual cannot accept this award from CAMWS if he or she receives another award or scholarship for this summer travel and the combined amount of these awards would be more than the cost of the program.

 

The recipient of a Semple, Grant or Benario Award cannot also receive the CAMWS Excavation/Fieldschool Award in the same year.

 

On-line Application Form must be received by Friday, January 30, 2015.  

 

Questions regarding the application may be directed to the Chair of the Semple, Grant and Benario subcommittee at sgb@camws.org.

 

For more information, go to https://camws.org/awards/sgb.php.   

 

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CAMWS Award for Special Service

The CAMWS Award for Special Service formally acknowledges exceptional promotion of classics and/or accomplishments for the profession in CAMWS territory. The award is given pro re nata.

 

Eligibility: CAMWS membership is not required. Recipients can be classicists or non-classicists who have made special contributions to the promotion of Latin and Classical studies, especially at the state and local level, in CAMWS territory. Ideal candidates include people involved in our field who do much for their local communities or classics in general, but do not interact frequently, if at all, at large meetings.  

 

Nevertheless, these people make MORE than a difference. Suitable candidates for this award also include parents or community members who support local Latin programs in notable ways; companies that donate money or other resources for the promotion of Latin; school administrators who help Latin teachers by giving access to school rooms or supplies or extra funds; newspapers or magazines that give free advertising for events; benefactors who give money for books or scholarships; or students who have promoted Latin in an original manner.

 

Nomination and selection process: Please submit a signed statement of nomination, 500-600 words in length, that describes the nominee and his/her work. Nominations for the 2015 can be emailed to camws@camws.org (or mailed to CAMWS, 700 E. Broadway, Monmouth, IL 61462) but must be received by Friday, January 30, 2015. Supporting documents are not required, but they may be solicited if questions arise. The chair of the Steering Committee on Awards and Scholarships with advice from the five subcommittee chairs will then determine the winners. Announcement of the results will be made at the spring meeting. If you have any questions about this award, please contact the Chair of the Steering Committee, at steering@camws.org.

 

For more information, go to https://camws.org/awards/service.php.   

 

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CAMWS Teaching Awards

CAMWS offers two awards for excellence in teaching.  The Kraft Award for Excellence in Secondary School Teaching recognizes outstanding teachers of Latin in public or private schools (middle schools included). The CAMWS Award for Excellence in College Teaching recognizes outstanding teachers of the Classics in college or university. Part-time teachers (who teach at least half time with a minimum of five years teaching experience) are eligible for either award.

 

These awards are made annually. The recipients are announced at the annual CAMWS meeting and each receive an award of $500.  

 

For further information about the award for middle or high school teachers or to make a nomination, please go to Kraft Award for Excellence in Secondary School Teaching.

 

For further information about the award for college teachers or to make a nomination, please go to CAMWS Award for Excellence in College Teaching.

 

These awards are made by the CAMWS Subcommittee on Teaching Awards. The chair of this subcommittee can be reached at teaching@camws.org

 

For more information, go to https://camws.org/awards/teacher.php.     

 

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Reports From Past Winners
Reports from 2014 Manson A. Stewart Scholarship Winners

Chance Bonar (St. Olaf College)
  • The Manson A. Stewart Scholarship has allowed me to continue my pursuit of a triple major in Religion, Classics, and Ancient Studies at St. Olaf College. Last year, I researched the Jewish historian Josephus and his portrayal(s) of Herod the Great in both Jewish War and Jewish Antiquities and was given the opportunity to present this paper at an academic conference at Luther Seminary. Before graduating, I plan on spending a month in Israel/Palestine, as well as taking courses in Greek Drama, Virgil, and completing a research project on oral tradition in the Johannine church community. Overall, support from this CAMWS scholarship is helping me pursue my passions in the interdisciplinary fields of classics and religion

Katherine Needham (Washington University in St. Louis)
  • Kate is a junior at Washington University in St. Louis where she is studying Classics and English. She has particularly enjoyed writing on Tacitus and his depiction of Tiberius' departure from Rome in Annals 4. She is also fascinated by the classical tradition and has enjoyed researching its function in Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde and in Renaissance English playhouse architecture. She will continue studying Latin and Greek in St. Louis this fall and will travel to Oxford University in the spring, where she plans to study both Greek and Early Modern English poetry. She is currently considering a senior thesis which will likely focus on the role of the classical tradition in some aspect of Early Modern drama. 
     
Report from 2014 Semple Award Winner Lauren S. Rogers

It was a tremendous joy exploring Greece this summer as part of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens Summer Session. Due to the support of the 2014 Semple Award, I had the opportunity to learn from an extraordinary group of scholars who were generous in sharing their expertise and knowledge. While in Athens, I was able to conduct research at the Blegen Library, which helped me finalize my two site reports for the program: the Library of Hadrian and Pella. The program directors, Amy and Nassos Paplexandrou, were wonderful leaders, and they possessed boundless enthusiasm for all of our adventures throughout Greece.  

 

Although we visited a number of awe-inspiring sites, my most memorable experiences from the trip include visiting the temple of Apollo at Bassae, touring the Aghios Vassilios excavation near Sparta, and exploring the Corycian Cave of Pan near Delphi. The topography of Greece is breathtakingly beautiful, and I spent a few moments each day drinking in the landscape-whether it was the view of Sphacteria from Pylos or the bustle of the Plaka near the Acropolis. After viewing kernoi at Gournia and finding rota gameboard from the Roman period on site at Eleusis, I have been inspired to design a teaching unit on games and leisure activities into my curriculum for the upcoming school year. I am grateful for the support of the Classical Association of the Middle West and South in enriching my understanding of the Classics, and I look forward to unpacking my experience at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens for many years to come.

 

Lauren Rogers

Salem Academy

Winston-Salem, North Carolina

 

   

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Report from 2014 Grant Award Winner Rachael Cullick

My participation in the American Academy at Rome's 2014 Classical Summer School, which was so generously funded by the CAMWS Grant Award, was even more enjoyable and productive than I had anticipated.  While there were countless pleasures in spending six weeks exploring Rome and her environs, with daily views from the Janiculum, there were three main areas in which my work and professional development as a classicist were advanced.

In general, as both a student and teacher of Classics, the more intimate knowledge of the topography of Rome will be of great benefit to my understanding of Roman history and culture, as well as to my ability to teach such material in an engaging fashion, in a range of courses.  In particular, I gained a deeper appreciation of the layers of Roman civic building, and that would not have been possible without seeing the sites in person, especially the Forum.  Similarly, no amount of study can truly convey the effect of sight lines and the interactions of the architecture and geography.  I noticed this particularly in the case of the Colosseum, and the way its commanding view of both the Arch of Titus and the Palatine gave an immediate and powerful impression of how the Flavian buildings encompassed the heart of Rome.  The Temple of Venus and Rome provided a similar effect, in that the experience of entering the space brought home how it really does bridge the Forum and the Colosseum; the proximity of the Arch of Constantine, made more striking by the elevated perspective, further demonstrated the use of later buildings to gain visual command.

The Temple of Venus and Rome was also of interest to me because it honors Roma, the divine embodiment of Rome, as I am curious about the various ways the Romans used the feminine to represent political power and imperium.  Much of my work in this area so far as been based in literary sources, and one of my goals in attending the Classical Summer School was to be able to learn more about such representations in material culture.  This I was certainly able to do, and the opportunity to study the province reliefs from the Hadrianeum was particularly valuable, given my current interest and work on feminine embodiments of provinces and imperial power.

The opportunity to learn more about Etruscan culture was a significant part of what drew me to the American Academy's Classical Summer School, and study of the religion and material culture turned out to be quite fruitful.  As I had anticipated, the iconography and role of demonic figures such as Vanth and Charun provided important context for my dissertation work on the female demonic in Latin epic, but even this initial research into Etruscan religion and imagery was productive and stimulating more generally, and I look forward to building upon it in my study of ancient religions.

I am deeply grateful for the generosity of the Grant Award from CAMWS.  Both by advancing my research on specific topics and by adding to my understanding of Classics in general, the travel and study made possible by the Grant Award will continue to be invaluable to me personally and, I hope, to my contributions to the field.

Rachael Cullick
University of Minnesota
Minneapolis, MN

Report from 2014 Benario Award Winner Zachary Woolfolk

Thanks to the Janice and Herbert Benario Award, I was fortunate enough this summer to be able to participate in The Vergilian Society's "Greeks and Romans in Towns and Country: Under the Shadow of Vesuvius" this summer. The seasoned directors, Professors Ann Koloski-Ostrow (Brandeis University) and Steven Ostrow (MIT), modeled the excellent sort of teaching to which I aspire as they guided us through discovering firsthand the immense importance of Campania in the history of Western civilization. As my first experience abroad, I had hoped to enrich my Latin MAT degree by going beyond the books and learning down-to-earth knowledge of the ins and outs of daily life in the Classical world. What I learned from our tireless leaders surpassed my hopes and expectations. My adventure in Campania was very memorable, and my newfound knowledge will help me to provide my future students with a more holistic understanding of the world of the ancient Romans.

 

The directors' long involvement in the archaeology of the Bay of Naples placed them in a unique position to provide us with a full itinerary of incredible sites. Their expert introductions and commentary throughout brought each excursion to life, as they unveiled the significance of even the simplest stone blocks. We enjoyed behind-the-scenes looks at Pompeii and Herculaneum, gaining special access to buildings closed to the general public. We trekked to the top of Vesuvius, and appreciated breathtaking views of the bay on one side, and the rocky crater on the other, as we read Pliny's letters and contemplated the awful power of the volcano. Beyond the often-visited sites such as these and the spectacular collections of the museums of Naples, we ventured off the beaten path to less-frequented spots with just as much to learn from, such as the amphitheater and Mithraeum of Capua, the extensive urban ruins at Saepinum, and the Villa Regina and its charming museum in Boscoreale.

 

Our transition from site to site was not random; the directors framed our journeys within a historical perspective, as we traced Rome's path to powerful empire from its earliest encounters with outsiders, such as the Greeks at Cumae and the Samnites along the Appenines. It is incredible how profoundly history was shaped by early interactions such as these. Without the Greeks and Samnites, the Romans would perhaps not have risen to the heights to which they did, and consequently our languages, laws, architecture, and more might look very different today! We think of ourselves as living in a highly interconnected world today, but all too easily we fail to appreciate the miraculous feats of human achievement and long-distance travel, trade, and colonization, over 2,000 years ago.

 

We as a society are like the Romans in so many ways, and it is this basis that initially captured my interest in Classics. Through rich and poor, life and death, love and hate, town and country, it is remarkable how similar to our own were the daily experiences and thoughts that preoccupied our ancient brethren. It is this message that I can now more effectively incorporate into my teaching of Latin, and really connect students to the texts they read. In fact, I have already begun using what I learned in Campania in my mentorship with a local high school Latin teacher as a part of my teacher training for my degree program. I have shared with her classes some of the archaeology, history, and real-world Latin that I saw and learned about in the course of my trip and plan to incorporate much more of it into my future teaching. Without the support of CAMWS and the Benario Award, I would not have had this opportunity to gain such practical, meaningful knowledge that I will use to the best of my ability to ignite in my students a passion for learning about and connecting with our ancient counterparts.

 

Zachary Woolfolk

Indiana University

Bloomington, Indiana

 

 
Report from Excavation/Field School Award Winner
Megan Esparsa

I am very grateful and honored that I was chosen by CAMWS to receive a grant in order to participate in the Villa del Vergigno field school in Montelupo Fiorentino, Tuscany. In addition to excavating, I was given responsibilities in the finds lab and did an independent study with the project director.  

 

At the site, I learned proper excavation techniques from experienced archaeologists, how to observe stratigraphic units, how to document data on formal excavation forms, mapping, measuring, and drawing archaeological features and artifacts, and how to use a Harris matrix. I also listened to and engaged in trench talks, in which interpretation of the area was discussed.

 

In the lab, my duties included washing bags of pottery from each stratigraphic unit. I sorted and recorded information about the objects on a pottery count form.  Additionally, I recorded special finds and helped other students learn how to wash and sort pottery. I also contributed to the glossary in our site's lab manual.  

 

The goals of my independent study were to examine the pottery from the first several excavation seasons in order to determine the degree of continuity of the area before and after Roman colonization. Another important part of my project was to document the ceramic evidence into a database, which will eventually be available online for free. The finds from the first excavation seasons were in a warehouse, in boxes which were marked based on the stratigraphic units they were discovered in. We were able to go through one third of these boxes and process the finds from these units using pottery count forms from our site's lab. I put them all into an Excel file. Throughout this year, I plan to continue analyzing my data, its significance to the site, and what questions I am able to answer about the people who lived and worked there during antiquity.  

 

My independent study was a very successful start to what we didn't know was a much larger endeavor, with a lot of data left to be processed. There are many potential research foci for future seasons - not only for me, but for future students as well.

 

My experience allowed me to start something I want to do for the rest of my life. My experience in the field, lab, and collecting data from the warehouse has helped me prepare for the transition from undergraduate to graduate work. I plan to continue my work at the Villa del Vergigno and expand my research question and my dataset in order to study the material lives of the people who lived and worked there in antiquity. This is what I would like to do for my MA thesis. Looking even further ahead, my eventual goal is to create a corpus of common wares found in this region of Tuscany, possibly for my doctoral dissertation. 

 

Megan Esparsa

Grand Valley State University

Allendale, Michigan

 

Megan Esparsa (far right) at the Villa del Vergigno Archaeological Project


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Report from Excavation/Field School Award Winner  
Becca McGinn

The CAMWS Excavation and Field School Award allowed me to attend the field school at Cetamura del Chianti under the direction of Dr. Nancy de Grummond for the 2014 excavation season. It cannot be overstated how important this award has been to me. I had not been able to excavate previously, which created an enormous gap in my education. My experiences at Cetamura have been invaluable and no doubt will continue to be so in the future.

 

Cetamura is ideal not only for learning field techniques generally but also for engaging in the study of Classical Archaeology particularly. The site has revealed various phases of occupation from the Archaic Etruscan period to medieval times. Cetamura supported an Etruscan sanctuary, Roman baths, and a medieval fortified village. Recent investigations show that the Etruscans occupied Cetamura in the Archaic, "Classical," and Late periods. They have also indicated that for the fifth century and much of the fourth century there is a lack of Etruscan settlement. Beyond the chronology, the site is of interest because of the breadth of artifacts being unearthed-materials include stone, terracotta, ceramics, metal and glass.

 

I am currently pursuing the MA in Classical Archaeology and the specialization in museum theory and practice at Florida State University. My ideal career would combine the responsibilities of a professor with those of a museum curator. Attending the field school at Cetamura has made me even more passionate about my field and eager for what the future holds. During my time there I not only learned the field techniques that I was previously lacking but also gained experience in trench management by serving as a unit supervisor. This practical knowledge is transferable to any site I should work at in the future. Additionally, the training I received in the handling and recording of various forms and media will be useful not only in the field, but also for museum work. While I have had previous experience in archiving, my time at Cetamura provided insights into the process by which excavated items eventually become incorporated into collections. During my time there I was also able to engage in research methods that are facilitated by being on site. My lab project was related to "grayware" ceramics newly excavated from an Etruscan well. This investigation immediately made clear the benefits of having tangible objects to work with as opposed to relying on photographs. I also appreciate how helpful it is not only to be able to consult  texts for comparanda but also to be able to visit other sites and museums to examine their holdings. The excavations at Cetamura were ideal for me in that I was able to see firsthand how my interests in Classical Archaeology and museum studies can be married.

 

After having worked at Cetamura there is no doubt that I am in the right field. Before excavating I based my interest in Classical Archaeology on the courses I had taken, readings I had done, and others' reports of their field experience. This information made it clear to me that I was highly interested in the subject, but I questioned how I would find fieldwork. After having worked at Cetamura, I can say that there is no substitute for being able to work hands-on with archaeological material. There is nothing more thrilling than being able to excavate an object or structure and assess it first-hand. I have gained so much perspective from my work at Cetamura, not only on the excavation process and how objects enter collections, but also on myself. I have come away with a much deeper appreciation for what I study and the confidence that I have chosen the right field. I am extremely grateful for the CAMWS Excavation and Field School Award, without which it would not have been possible for me to attend the field school at Cetamura.

 

Becca McGann

Florida State University

Tallahassee, FL

 

   

 

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New in The Classical Journal 

Classical Journal Cover
 
The following articles are in CJ 110.1, a special issue on Cicero:

Elizabeth Asmis, CICERO MYTHOLOGUS: THE MYTH OF THE FOUNDERS IN DE REPUBLICA
  • This article proposes that in De Republica Cicero redefines the state by mythologizing the past. It suggests that Scipio's story of the foundation of the mixed constitution is a myth, exalting the wisdom of the founders as an example for their descendants. Through the use of dialogue, Cicero offers an insight into his creation of the myth by not only having Scipio present a highly selective account of the foundation, but also having another interlocutor, Laelius, raise an objection against the founders' alleged wisdom. The mythic quality of the narrative about the founders then paves the way for the dream of Scipio at the end of the dialogue. The dream advances Cicero's mythologizing of the past to a vision for the future, where the restoration of the state rests on the necessity of imitating the virtues of the ancestors.

John Dugan, NON SINE CAUSA SED SINE FINE: CICERO'S COMPULSION TO REPEAT HIS CONSULATE

  • Freud's theory of the compulsion to repeat in response to a traumatic experience can help explain Cicero's repeated attempts to praise, or have others praise, his consulate. This article argues that Cicero's humiliating exile, and his consequent loss of status, constituted a trauma that Cicero sought to work through by means of narratives that integrate his consulate, exile, and return into a unified story that encapsulates his banishment within an overarching narrative of triumph. Cicero's pitching of his story to the historian Lucceius (Fam. 5.12) demonstrates the psychological dimensions of Cicero's notorious self-praise. 

Jon Hall, CICERO'S BRUTUS AND THE CRITICISM OF ORATORICAL PERFORMANCE

  • In the Brutus Cicero shows himself an astute critic of oratorical performance. This paper examines Cicero's opinions on the different modes of delivery employed by many of the orators he mentions in his dialogue. It ultimately reaffirms the power and significance of delivery in supporting or overriding other elements of speech-making. Finally, because the Brutus is to a large extent a record of Cicero's opinions, the dialogue opens a window on his preferences and perhaps even practice in his own oratorical delivery. 

Dan Hanchey, DAYS OF FUTURE PASSED: FICTION FORMING FACT IN CICERO'S DIALOGUES

  • This paper analyzes Cicero's citations of the not-always-historical past in his theoretical corpus. Examining both the Marian oak in the prologue of De Legibus and Cicero's overall use of historical references, I suggest that Cicero explicitly employs unhistorical (or at least not certifiably true) exempla, with a view to the internal consistency of the dialogues' fictional world. By encouraging the reader's acceptance of such fictional examples, Cicero establishes an intersubjective and empathetic relationship with his audience. Ultimately, Cicero seeks to uphold and use others to confirm his internal world as an alternative to the tense world of Roman politics. 

Rosa Rita Marchese, SPEECH AND SILENCE IN CICERO'S FINAL DAYS

  • Composed in spring of 46 BC, Cicero's Brutus emphasizes oratorical silence, in stark contrast with the prominence of the speech act found in the Pro Marcello and first Philippic. Yet in the face of those difficult times and amidst the silence that such times engender, Cicero ironically finds his voice. This paper will demonstrate Cicero's acute awareness, in his final days, of the need to employ his rediscovered voice in light of eloquence's changed role in Rome's new political climate. 

FORUM:   

 

Bret Mulligan, CONIURATIO!  ETHOPOEIA AND 'REACTING TO THE PAST' IN THE LATIN CLASSROOM (AND BEYOND)

  • "Reacting to the Past" is a pedagogical method that uses immersive role-playing games set in discrete historical moments to motivate efficacious engagement with primary sources. Coniuratio, a new "Reacting" game set during the Catilinarian crisis of 63 BCE, provides a mechanism for students to learn about Roman history and culture, to practice the tenets of classical rhetoric, and to hone their skills in English (and possibly Latin) communication. The article concludes by outlining supplemental activities that may be used to introduce Coniuratio in language and civilization courses and by reviewing the roots of the Reacting method in the ancient educational practice of ethopoeia.

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New in Teaching Classical Languages

 

Teaching Classical Languages 5.2 is now available.

 

With this issue, Teaching Classical Languages celebrates its fifth year of publication. Over the past five years TCL has published nearly forty articles, studies, review articles, and essays that not only encourage readers to reflect and reassess what they do in the classroom, but also engage with trends in applied linguistics, world language education, and digital pedagogy. This issue gratefully acknowledges all those who have contributed their time and expertise as referees over the past five years. In addition, over 100 readers completed the TCL Reader Survey. This issue contains a full report summarizing reader comments and suggestions for improvement.

 

Issue 5.2 features four articles with new ideas for the classroom. In "Composition, Competition, and Community," Kristine Trego proposes that uniting two seemingly opposite approaches, competition and cooperation, will lead to a deeper understanding of Latin grammar. In "Accenting Ancient Greek Finite Verbs," Kathryn Chew provides four simple rules, clear explanations, and many practice exercises to help students become more confident in accenting Greek verbs, nouns, and adjectives. In "Greeking Out: Creating Digital Tutorials and Support Materials for Beginners," Karen Rosenbecker and Brian Sullivan describe the art and science of making short animated screencasts to help students review the concepts behind particular grammatical points. Finally, in "Latin Commentaries on the Web," Anne Mahoney compares two approaches to digitizing commentaries and making them available online: Open Book Publishers and Dickinson College Commentaries. My hope is that this issue inspires you with new ideas to take into the classroom and helps you become a more reflective teacher.

  • Kristine Trego, "Composition, Competition, and Community: A Preliminary Study of the Use of Latin Composition in a Cooperative Learning Environment"
  • Kathryn Chew, "Accenting Ancient Greek Finite Verbs: Four Simple Rules, with Applications for Nouns and Adjectives"
  • Karen Rosenbecker and Brian Sullivan, "Greeking Out: Creating Digital Tutorials and Support Materials for Beginners"
  • Anne Mahoney, "Latin Commentaries on the Web"
-John Gruber-Miller
Editor, Teaching Classical Languages

 

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News from the Committee for the Promotion of Latin  

Upcoming Events at the 11th Annual Meeting of CAMWS in Boulder, CO:
  • CPL Panel:  "Rethinking Memorization in Learning Latin"
  • CPL Workshop: "Latin at the Middle School Level: Who Are Our Students? How Do We Reach Them?"
Congratulations to the 2013-2014 recipients of CPL funding, and a big thank-you for their remarkable outreach projects:
  • Marcie Handler (Covington Latin School) received a Caristia Grant for taking a group of 29 students and 6 adults (three teachers and three parents) to visit the Parthenon in Nashville, TN.
  • Gwen Compton Engle (John Carroll University) received a Bridge Initiative Grant for organizing an Alumni Panel, entitled "Classics and Your Career."  The panel brings in six Classics alumni from John Carroll University who have each followed a different career path to speak about their experiences choosing and pursuing their career paths.
  • Christopher Craig (University of Tennessee, Knoxville) received a Bridge Initiative Grant for hosting a speaker at the 33rd annual University of Tennessee Latin Day.
  • E. Del Chrol (Marshall University) received a Bridge Initiative Grant for organizing an outreach event to the broader community featuring a lecture on astronomy and astrology in Rome and in Hellenistic works.  Del also received a Caristia Grant for the Classics Department's annual banquet.
CAMWS Announcements
CAMWS Newsletter Editor Search 

CAMWS is searching for candidates interested in serving a 3-year term as the editor of the CAMWS Newsletter, to begin in the fall of 2015.  The Newsletter is published three times annually (fall, winter, spring) in both electronic and print format.  The editor's tasks involve: inclusion of regular news items and the solicitation of special interest items, the production and formatting of both the electronic and print versions, and the transmission of the electronic version to our membership.  CAMWS currently uses Constant Contact for the electronic version of the Newsletter, which is very user friendly, so technical expertise is not necessary.  The position comes with an annual stipend and a place on CAMWS's Executive Committee and Publications Subcommittee.  The successful candidate will need to make every effort to attend the annual meeting and must be a member of CAMWS in good standing.  Interested individuals should contact Ruth Scodel, President of CAMWS, at president@camws.org.  For more information on editorial duties, feel free to contact Stephanie McCarter, the current editor, at newsletter@camws.org.
Changes and Additions to CAMWS Awards and Scholarships  

The CAMWS Executive Committee announces the following changes and additions to CAMWS Awards and Scholarships, to take effect immediately, for the 2014-2015 fiscal year.
  • $500 increase the Semple Award (for ASCSA)
  • The addition of a translation exam for Level 2 high school students (to be reviewed in 5 years)
  • Administration of the current translation exam to college students( to be reviewed in 5 years)
  • Administration of the new Level 2 exam to college students (to be reviewed in 5 years
  • Increase the Bolchazy Pedagogy Award by $250
  • Addition of a second $2000 field school award (for undergraduates)
  • Increase in Stewart Travel Awards (for either CAMWS-SS or the regular meeting) by $3500     
  • Make undergraduates preparing for a teaching career eligible for Stewart Teacher Training Award
  • Make part-time teachers (who teach at least half time with a minimum of five years teaching experience) eligible for the Kraft and CAMWS Teaching Awards
  • Make all graduate students (not just those who happen to be teaching Latin) eligible for Stewart Travel Awards.  
  • Give preference to secondary teachers for the Stewart Travel Awards with an explicit provision that the award can pay for a substitute teacher to allow a teacher to attend the meeting
  • Change the name of the Manson Stewart Scholarship to the Manson Stewart Award and make the monetary award directly to students (perhaps as a textbook award or award for travel) rather than sending the money to the institutions as per previous practice

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CAMWS Members in the News  

Cathy Scaife
of Lexington Catholic High School is the recipient of the Kentucky World Language Association's "Outstanding Latin Teacher Award" for her efforts on behalf of world language students at LCHS. Mrs. Scaife is the first Latin teacher to ever receive this award.

From Our Institutional Members
Updates From Ascanius: The Youth Classics Initiative

Ascanius: The Youth Classics Initiative is a nonprofit organization dedicated to advancing the knowledge of and inspiring lifelong learning about Latin, Greek, and the ancient Greco-Roman world, especially at the elementary and middle school levels.

This fall brigs a brand new video series, a continuation of the SCRIBO Latin Creative Writing Contest, two featured publications, and the ability to join Ascanius as a member!  Visit www.ascaniusyci.org for additional happenings!
  • eToga Trek Videos:  Introducing eToga Trek, a new video series about Ancient Rome!  Ascanius will offer five online eToga Trek videos this academic year.  These engaging videos give studies the opportunity to participate in a hands-on activity and to respond to the information presented.  The inaugural video discusses the Roman family.  The others will focus on games, clothing, architecture, and mosaics.  Each video is available at no charge.
  • SCRIBO: Latin Creative Writing Contest:  This student contest is designed to: spur interest and excitement in using Latin for creative writing, provide teachers with high quality materials in Latin to read in their classes, and honor and recognize top work in Latin creative writing.  Registration deadline is December 5.  Student submissions are due by December 19th.  Visit www.ascaniusyci.org for more information, ways to incorporate SCRIBO into your classes, sample entries, and to register
  • Featured Publication: Activitates Liberis II: Leap into Latin is our 15th Anniversary Edition of fun and exciting activities and lessons, designed especially for elementary school teachers to introduce their students to the language, culture, and literature of the Greco-Roman world.  Step-by-step detailed lessons include how to make your own Roman bulla, look at ancient inscriptions, conduct a classroom scavenger hunt, or explore real Latin poetry!  The book comes with its own companion site which includes online and electronic resources.  Visit www.ascaniusyci.org for more information, sample pages, and to order.
  • Featured Publication: Vocabula Picta is a fun new illustrated dictionary of Latin words for the modern world.  Each page contains pictures of common 21st century items, such as a computer, kitchen fork, or tennis ball, and its corresponding Latin word.  This book is great for all who enjoy incorporating spoken Latin into their everyday lives.  Furthermore, this dictionary is a great resource for teachers and students to include Latin words and sentences into the classroom.  We offer this text in both a print and an e-book format.  Visit www.ascaniusyci.org for more information, sample pages, and to order.
  • Become a member of Ascanius!  As a member, you will receive: "The Shooting Star" (a bi-monthly e-newsletter featuring full lesson and activity ideas and advice in response to member questions), access to a Members-Only section of our website (including free lesson and activity ideas), and 10% discounts on all Ascanius publications, workshops, programs, and contest.  Membership is only $25 per year!  Visit www.ascaniusyci.org for more information and to become a member.
The 2015 Bernice L. Fox Classics Writing Contest 
sponsored by  
The Department of Classics 
at Monmouth College 

 

 

 

Topic: A Modern Version of a Myth from Ovid's Metamorphoses

Retell a metamorphoses myth from Ovid's poem in a modern, 21st-century context.

 

This contest is open to any student enrolled full-time in high school during the current school year. An award of $250.00 will be given to the author of the best entry written in English on a specified theme. The entry may be an essay, a short story, a play, a poem, or any original literary work. This contest was established in 1985 by the Department of Classics at Monmouth College in Monmouth, Illinois, to honor Bernice L. Fox, to promote the study of Latin and the Classics in high schools, and to recognize the good work of high school students.

 

Judging

The entry should make frequent, specific, accurate, and appropriate references to actual events. Papers will be judged on historical accuracy, appropriate use of ancient sources, originality, quality of material, thematic development, appropriateness, correctness of English style, and effectiveness of presentation.

 

Contest Guidelines

Entries must be typed, double-spaced, on 8-1/2 x 11 inch paper, on one side only. No electronic submissions will be accepted. The entry must fit the theme of this year's contest. No minimum or maximum length is required. The entrant's name and school must not appear on the entry. Contestants should place a personal identification code (a randomly selected nine character series) on the top left-hand corner of every page of the entry and on a separate 8-1/2 x 11 inch sheet of paper which also contains the following information: author's name, date of birth, the student's personal identification code, school name, school address, teacher's name, and school phone number. No more than ten entries will be accepted from any individual school and only one entry per student. Failure to follow these guidelines will result in disqualification. Every entrant will receive a certificate of participation from Monmouth College. All entries must be postmarked no later than March 15th, and mailed to Dr. Thomas J. Sienkewicz, Capron Professor of Classics, Monmouth College, Monmouth, Illinois 61462. For further information, including a list of previous winners, please consult the contest website

(http://department.monm.edu/classics/Department/FoxContest/)

All entries become the property of Monmouth College. The winner will be announced on or by April 15th on the contest website.

 

About Bernice L. Fox

Bernice L. Fox taught courses in English, Latin and Greek at Monmouth College from 1947 to 1981, and served as chair of the Department of Classics from 1970 till her retirement in 1981. Throughout her long and dynamic career she worked tirelessly to promote the Classics in Illinois high schools and colleges. She is also the author of Tela Charlottae, the Latin translation of E. B. White's Charlotte's Web. In 1991 Monmouth College conferred on her the honorary degree of Doctor of Humane Letters. She died in 2003.

 
The University of Tennessee's 4th Annual Undergraduate Classics Research Conference: Call For Papers

The University of Tennessee's Department of Classics is pleased to announce its 4th Annual Undergraduate Classics Research Conference.  The conference will be held February 21, 2015, and we are currently calling for submissions from interested undergraduates throughout North America.  This conference will pertain to a wide variety of topics concerning the classical world. Paper sessions will be divided by theme based on the topics of the papers accepted.  Abstracts will be considered from any discipline within classical studies (archaeology, history, philology, etc.) or a related field.  Examples range from an analysis of the rhetoric of a Demosthenic speech to a report of the findings of a current excavation to a commentary on the hybridization of style in Pompeian wall painting (this is not an exhaustive list).

            

Papers should take no more than fifteen minutes to present (with five additional minutes for Q&A afterwards).  Audio-visual equipment will be available for presenters.  Abstracts of no more than 250 words double-spaced should be submitted by November 14, 2014 to Emma Pugmire (epugmire@utk.edu).  Please see the webpage (http://classics.utk.edu/ugcc.php) for additional submission instructions.  Notifications of acceptance will be sent on December 2, 2014.  Travel grants will be provided to select students on a competitive basis.  Any questions or concerns should be sent to Emma Pugmire via email at epugmire@vols.utk.edu or Chloe Lovelace at clovelac@vols.utk.edu.

 

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Ripon College Classics Scholarships

Ripon College awards two different Latin scholarships, one recognizing excellence on the National Latin Exam (NLE), the other honoring outstanding achievement in advanced Classical Language study completed in the Ripon College Classics Program.

 

Pre-college students who earn at least a Magna designation on the Level II or higher National Latin Exam and who matriculate at Ripon College are eligible for $2,000 annual scholarships, renewable for an additional three years for a total value of $8,000. Annual renewal requires a single course in Greek, Latin, or Classical Studies taken the first year at Ripon and continuing satisfactory progress toward a degree in any major. These scholarships can be combined with the competitive award of Ripon's substantial Academic Scholarships up to an annual maximum of $15,000.

 

The Grace G. Goodrich (Class of 1906) Classics Scholarships are awarded to students demonstrating excellence in advanced classes in Latin and Greek who are majors and minors in the field. In recent years an annual allocation of approximately $7,000 has been awarded to 2-4 students in stipends ranging from $1,500 to $5,000 according to merit. Outstanding recipients in any one year may qualify for additional stipends in subsequent years.

 

For questions about these scholarships or the Ripon College Classics Program please contact Professor E. R. Lowry (lowrye@ripon.edu or 920-748-8710). Visit Ripon College at www.ripon.edu.

 

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Call For Papers: Vergil Week 2015 Symposium at Case Western Reserve University (Cleveland, OH)

"The Fall of Troy in Vergil's Aeneid"
Friday 24 April 2015

The Greek conquest of the city of Troy is one of the most powerful and haunting legends from antiquity. The narratives of the victors' brutality, the tragic dignity of the captive Trojan women, and the smoldering ruins of the once-great city of Priam have inspired literature and the arts for thousands of years. Vergil's account of the Fall of Troy in Book Two of the Aeneid remains preeminent among narratives of the last day of Troy because we hear of the catastrophic events from Aeneas, a main participant in the action, and the character who unites the Homeric Greek tradition with an Italian foundation tradition. Book Two, moreover, includes some of the most important characters, unforgettable images, famous episodes and memorable lines in the entire epic: the Trojan horse, Neoptolemus and the killing of Priam and his son, Aeneas carrying his father on his shoulders, the ghost of Creusa...

 

This year during the annual Vergil Week celebrations on the campus of Case Western Reserve University, the Department of Classics will hold a symposium that will focus attention on Book Two of the Aeneid. We seek original scholarship that deals with any aspect of Book Two of Vergil's Aeneid. Scholars might consider Vergil's account of the Fall of Troy in comparison with what is known from the Greek Epic cycle or Greek tragedy; or address the issue of Aeneas's narrative as a story-within-a-story; or examine the authenticity of the Helen passage; or Greco-Roman art as inspiration for episodes within the book; or reception of Book Two in post-Classical literature and art...

 

Authors are invited to send an abstract and a brief cover letter in pdf by e-mail on or before Friday January 16, 2015 to Professor Timothy Wutrich (trw14@cwru.edu). Abstracts should have a title, address an issue or problem relevant to Book Two of the Aeneid; brief bibliography may be submitted on an additional page that bears the abstract title in its header. Abstracts should be no longer than 500 words in length, typed single-space in Times New Roman without authorial identification. Include the title of the paper in the cover letter. Submission of an abstract implies intent to participate in the symposium in Cleveland on Friday 24 April 2015.


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Washington University in St. Louis Announces New PhD Program in Classics

Washington University in St. Louis is now accepting applications for a new PhD program in Classical Studies.  Building on unique strengths and resources within and beyond the Department of Classics, the program will offer special tracks in ancient performance, Greek and Roman music, ancient history, and ancient philosophy.  The department's terminal MA program will continue.

PhD students receive full tuition remission and a sizable stipend.  More information is available on the department's website (https://classics.artsci.wustl.edu/graduate), and potential applicants can also contact Cathy Keane, Director of Graduate Studies (ckeane@wustl.edu).

 

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MA in Comparative Literature/Classics at the
University of New Mexico 

The Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures at the University of New Mexico offers an MA in Comparative Literature and Cultural Studies, with a concentration in Classical languages.  By the time our students graduate, they will have completed an additional three years of Greek and Latin, studied literary and critical theory, engaged in graduate-level research while writing a master's thesis, and gained experience as a Teaching and Grading Assistant.  Our students have gone on to PhD programs in Classics or related fields at top-ranked programs or have found employment teaching classical languages at secondary schools across the country.  All our students are guaranteed 2 years of support, and students in good standing are eligible for continued funding for a 3rd year.  Much of our program support takes the form of Teaching Assistantships teaching first and second year Latin and Greek.  Our most successful applicants have 3 years of Latin and 2 of Greek when they apply.

More information about graduate study at UNM, including a link to the online application, can be found at the website for the Office of Graduate Study (http://grad.unm.edu/home/) under the "Prospective Students" tab.  For information on UNM's Department of Fireign Languages and Literatures, consult http://fll.unm.edu/

For best consideration for funding, please apply by: February 15, 2015.

Any questions may be directed to Professor Osman Umurhan: umurhan@unm.edu.

 

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Call For Papers: Neo-Latin Symposium at the
University of Kentucky 

April 23 - 25, 2015 - University of Kentucky - Lexington, Kentucky

Deadline for Abstract Submission: November 10th, 2014

 

The KFLC announces sessions devoted to the presentation of scholarly research in the area of NEO-LATIN STUDIES (post-medieval Latin from Petrarch to the present).  Abstracts are invited in all areas and aspects of Neo-Latin Texts, including, but not limited to:  Neo-Latin Drama, Neo-Latin Epic (or other poetic genres), Neo-Latin Fiction, Neo-Latin Historiography and Ethnography, Neo-Latin Imitation, Neo-Latin Language and Style, Neo-Latin Letter Collections, Journals, Biographies, Autobiographies, Neo-Latin Rhetoric, Neo-Latin Treatises on Architecture, Botany, Cartography, Geography, Mathematics, Medicine, Music, Philosophy, Theology, Science, etc.

 

Sessions are 20 minutes followed by a 10-minute question & answer session. In addition to individual abstracts for paper presentations, proposals for panels of 5 papers will be considered.  

 

Individually submitted abstracts should be no more than 250 words.

 

Panel proposals of 5 presentations should be submitted as follows: The panel organizer should electronically submit a panel proposal.  The panel proposal cannot exceed one page in length and should include the theme of the panel, the organizer's name and contact information, and the names, contact information and affiliations of the panel participants.  Each participant MUST submit an individual abstract using our online system in addition to the panel proposal.  Please indicate that your presentation is part of a pre-organized panel and list the title and organizer of the panel in the abstract.

 

Papers may be read in English.  Acceptance of a paper or complete panel implies a commitment on the part of all participants to register and attend the conference. All presenters must pay the appropriate registration fee by MARCH 1, 2015 to be included in the program.

 

To submit abstracts and panel proposals BY NOVEMBER 1O, 2015, please visit: https://kflc.as.uky.edu/.

 

Terence Tunberg, Professor,
Division of Classics,
Department of Modern & Classical Languages, Literatures, & Cultures,
1055 Patterson Office Tower, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506-0027, U.S.A.

 

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Illinois Workshop on Imperial Latin Epic 

October 9-10, 2015

The Department of Classics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is pleased to announce a call for papers for its first graduate student workshop on Latin Epic Imperial poetry. We welcome papers addressing any issue related to the interpretation, study, or reception of the post-Vergilian epic poets of the Neronian and Flavian periods.

In the case of epic in the first century CE, popular opinion had already awarded the prize of first place; yet four poets still decided to compete. Lucan, Valerius Flaccus, Statius, and Silius Italicus were all expected to respond to the poetic corpus from Ennius on. However, each of them finds a way to demarcate their poems from the earlier tradition. For example, the consolidation of power by the Julio-Claudian dynasty afforded Lucan the opportunity to express in hexameters a reality never imagined by his predecessors. These circumstances, both political and literary, led to an era which was both conducive and stifling to creativity.

The workshop will be held on October 9-10, 2015. The application deadline will be Monday, January 5, 2015.

To apply: Submit via email a 250-300 word (not counting works cited), single-spaced abstract to silverepicillinois@gmail.com by January 5, 2015.  You may include basic citations in (Author, year) format; if you do, please include a list of works cited.  Papers will be judged anonymously; do not include your name in the abstract.  Do include your name, institution, and contact information in the email.  Participants selected for the conference will be notified by February 1, 2015.  Papers will be 15 minutes long and followed by a 5 minute question and answer period.  All participants will be asked to participate in a concluding round-table discussion to be moderated by Professor Antony Augoustakis.

 

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Announcements
Society for Classical Studies Precollegiate Teaching Award

The Society for Classical Studies has extended the deadline for nominations for its Precollegiate Teaching Award to Friday, November 7, 2014.  For instructions on submitting nominations, go to http://www.apaclassics.org/awards-and-fellowships/awards-excellence-teaching-precollegiate-level.

 

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The Yearbook of Ancient Greek Epic: Call For Papers

We are pleased to launch the Yearbook of Ancient Greek Epic (YAGE) to be published annually by Brill starting in 2016. The yearbook will cover the entire epic tradition from Homer to Nonnus. With each installment addressing a special topic, YAGE will be a platform for the dissemination of cutting-edge, synthetic research on Ancient Greek epic.

For Volume 1 (2016) and Volume 2 (2017), we invite submissions on any area of Ancient Greek epic, but we are especially interested in submissions on two special topics:

 

Work has been done on beginnings and endings, but what of the middle? What defines the middle of an epic? Does the middle function in the same way in written and oral epic poetry? In the case of Homeric epic, contributors might engage with the thorny issue of book-division and performance units or explore the reality of "fluctuating middles," that is, the fact that the "middle" changed each time a performer decided to present smaller sections of the entire epic. How does the concept of a "fluctuating middle" relate to ancient evidence concerning the performance of what we consider now a single episode or thematic unit of the Iliad and the Odyssey? Other relevant questions linked to middles include, for instance, the extent to which the middle of a work becomes a site for metapoetic exploration containing a second address to the Muse or Muses or other features of a poetological tincture.  

 

Scholarship has explored the influence of Homeric epic on Attic tragedy. We propose a more focused exploration of Greek epic's (above all, post-classical epic's) interactions with tragedy. Relevant questions include: How did poets, such as Apollonius, make use of the work of tragedians like Euripides? What did it mean for an epic poet, presenting his work in a very different fashion, to cite or deploy work intended for the tragic stage? Did audiences respond to "tragic" elements in epic the same way they responded to tragic dramas? Do ancient theories about how tragedy works apply to epic? How does the hero of the tragic stage compare with the hero of epic? How does the tragic chorus relate to choral elements in epic?

 

All submissions will be subject to a process of double blind peer review. We ask authors to prepare submissions accordingly. Submissions for volume 1 will be accepted until September 1, 2015. Submissions for volume 2 will be accepted until September 1, 2016.

Please send submissions in pdf format via email to either Jonathan Ready or Christos Tsagalis.

  • Jonathan Ready, Associate Professor of Classical Studies, Indiana University: jready@indiana.edu 

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Medieval Greek Summer Session at the Gennadius Library

The Gennadius Library of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens announces the 2015 summer session focused on the teaching of Medieval Greek.  Deadline: January 15, 2015.

For more information and to apply, to go http://www.ascsa.edu.gr/index.php/gennadius/medieval-greek-summer-session.

 

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Editor for The Classical Outlook 

The American Classical League invites applications for the position of Editor of The Classical Outlook, one of the most widely circulated Classics journals in North America. The Editor is responsible for the evaluation of materials for publication, with the assistance of an editorial board, and for the production and mailing (via mailing service) of four quarterly issues per annum. The position is not salaried, but a generous travel budget is provided to cover costs of attending the ACL's annual Institute each June as well as a mid-year Executive Committee meeting and other professional meetings.  The Editor's home institution (generally a college or university) is expected to provide released time, office space, and/or clerical assistance at a level sufficient to produce high quality camera-ready copy for printing. ACL can cover other expenses in the form of a grant to the host institution.  Dossiers, including letter of application, curriculum vitae, and evidence of achievement in scholarship, teaching, and professional service, as well as editorial experience, should be e-mailed by 1 December 2014 to Editor Search Committee of the American Classical League (info@aclclassics.org). Inquiries may be directed to the committee at that same e-mail address. Candidates will be interviewed via conference call from or in person at the 2015 meeting of the Society for Classical Studies, 8-11 January in New Orleans, LA. Appointment will be announced in Spring 2015 and confirmed by the ACL Council at its June 2015 meeting. The new Editor will be responsible for publication of the journal commencing with the Summer 2015 issue, following an orientation by the current Editor. 

 

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Sneak Peek: Panels and Workshops Approved for the
Annual Meeting in Boulder


Panel #1:  Facing Sickness: Medical Topics in Greco-Roman Literature (Alexander J. Hamilton, Ohio State University)
  • Humoral Theory and Archilochus Fragments 230 and 234 (Katrina Vaananen, Ohio State University)
  • Demons and Disease in Vergil's Aeneid  (Alexander James Hamilton, Ohio State University)
  • Caedens Dicere Verum: Juvenal's Use of Vergil in Satire II (Mark Wright, Ohio State University)
  • Sophocles Philoctetes as Therapeutic Tool (Christine Schaefers, Ohio State University)

Panel #2:  Feminist Approaches and Perspectives in Undergraduate Classics Courses (Sanjaya Thakur, Colorado College)

  • The Fog of War: Teaching Ancient Warfare with a Feminist Perspective (Matthew Taylor, Beloit College)
  • Feminist Classics and the Burden of Authority (Lisl Walsh, Beloit College)
  • Challenges for Male Instructors in Teaching Feminist Perspectives and Issues of Sexual Violence (Sanjaya Thakur, Colorado College)

Panel #3:  Graduate Student Issues Committee Panel: Making the Most of Your Graduate Student Experience (Sarah C. Teets, University of Virginia)

  • Unwritten Rules: The Art of Being a Graduate Student (Jackie Elliot, University of Colorado, Boulder)
  • Departmental Citizenship and Strategic Planning for the Graduate Student (Stephen Collins-Elliott, University of Tennessee)
  • Starting and Managing a Dissertation Support Group (Deb Trusty, Florida State University)
  • Dr. Sanegrad or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the PhD (Hunter Teets, Compass Youth and Family Services)
  • Teaching Latin in the Broader Community (Tyler Lansford, University of Colorado, Boulder)

Panel #4:  Growing Greek: New Activities and Resources at the Beginning Level (Wilfred Major, Louisiana State University)

  • Using Present Tense Markers to Make Beginning Greek Easier (Wilfred E. Major, Louisiana State University)
  • From the Ground Up: Building a Greek Curriculum (Wayne Rupp, St. Mary's Dominican High School, New Orleans)
  • The Growth of Greek: The National Greek Exam and Junior Classical League (Generosa Sangco-Jackson, Oak Hall School)
  • The College Greek Exam 2014-15 (Albert Watanabe, Louisiana State University)

Panel #5:  Keeping Latin Teachers in the Classroom: How Mentoring Works (Mary L. Pendergraft, Wake Forest University)

  • Mentoring and the Latin Teaching Methods Course (Alison Orlebeke, University of Colorado, Boulder)
  • Mentoring is Vital (Daniel W. Leon, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign)
  • From Generation unto Generation (Kendra Henry, Colorado College)
  • A New Teacher's Perspective (Benjamin Burtzos, Thomas MacLaren School)

Panel #6:  Navigating a Career in Classics (Amy Pinstone, University of Michigan)

  • The Professorial Sandbox: Bullying in the Academic Workplace (Judith Fletcher, Wilfrid Laurier University)
  • The Path to Tenure (Mary L. Pendergraft, Wake Forest University)
  • Planning Academic Parenthood: Negotiating a Family-Friendly Contract and Navigating Work-Life Balance (Yurie Hong, Gustavus Adolphus College)
  • The Two Body Problem, Contingent Positions, and Parenting on the Tenure Track (Sean Easton, Gustavus Adolphus College)
  • Parenting in the Academy: Policy, Personal Experience, and the Future (Pamela Gordon, University of Kansas

Panel #7:  Rethinking Memorization in Learning Latin (Barbara P. Weinlich, Eckerd College)

  • Quomodo Dicitur: The Importance of Memory in Language Learning (Jacqueline Carlon, University of Massachusetts, Boston)
  • Follow the Latin Brick Road: Minimalizing and Redefining Memorization in Latin Learning (Kenneth Kitchell, University of Massachusetts, Amherst)
  • Old Wines in New Skins: Rethinking Memorization in the Greek and Latin Classroom (B.A. Gregg, The Cleveland School of Science and Medicine)
  • Metaphorical Competence as an Aid to Idiom Learning in Latin (William Short, University of Texas at San Antonio)
  • Memorization: Mastery of Modification? (Eddie Lowry, Ripon College)

Panel #8: Satiric Takes on Philosophy, Philosophic Takes on Satire (T.H.M. Gellar-Goad, Wake Forest University)

  • L'Anti-Ennius chez Lucrce: Satire and Literary Polemic in De Rerum Natura (Mathias Hanses, Columbia University)
  • Civic Ambition and Satiric Authority in Lucilius and Lucretius (T.H.M. Gellar-Goad, Wake Forest University)
  • Sermones 2.5: A Shady Prophet, an Obsequious Hero, and a Poet with Something to Prove (Sergio Yona, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign)
  • The Consolation of Not-philosophy in Lucilius and Juvenal (Catherine Keane, Washington University in St. Louis)
  • Lucian's Nigrinus: What is the Effective Corrective?  (Mitchell Pentzer, University of Colorado, Boulder)

Workshop #1: Easily Enriching the Youngest Minds with Latin: Student Programs, Teacher Programs, and Scholarships from Ascanius: The Youth Classics Institute (Kevin Jefferson and Nadia Ghosheh, Ascanius: The Youth Classics Initiative)

 

Workshop #2:  Latin at the Middle School Level: Who Are Our Students? How Do We Reach Them?  (Megan O. Drinkwater, Agnes Scott College)

 

Workshop #3: Linguistic Mastery for the New Millennium (Bernard Carrington, American Leadership Academy)

 

Workshop #4: Reverse-engineering a Syllabus: Using Learning Objectives to Design Your Courses (Jennifer L. LaFleur, University of Virginia) 

 

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CAMWS Contributors 2014-2015

CAMWS wishes to thank the following individuals and groups who have contributed to the organization since August.  To add your name to this list, please visit https://camws.org/donate.

Archaeology and Fieldwork Fund
Thomas J. Sienkewicz

Awards and Scholarships:
John Breuker, Jr.
Christina A. Clark
Sally R. Davis
Connie R. Dickerson
G. Edward Gaffney
Katherine A. Geffcken
Liane Houghtalin
Eleanor W. Leach

Bolchazy Fund:
Anonymous
Herbert W. and Janice M. Benario
John Breuker, Jr.
Bernard P. Carrington
Marianthe Colakis
Helena R. Dettmer
Frances M. Dunn
Anne H. Groton
Stanley A. Iverson
James G. Keenan
Paul J. Lotz
Eddie R. Lowry, Jr.
Linda S. Montross
Martha J. Payne
Stephen Pilewski
Marilyn B. Skinner
Elza C. Tiner

CPL
Wisconsin Latin Teachers Association
General Fund:
John Breuker, Jr.
Edwin L. Brown
Jenny Strauss Clay
Ann Raia Colaneri
Jane W. Crawford
James H. Dee
Thomas S. Fodice
Nicolas P. Gross
Rebecca R. Harrison
Barbara A. Hill
Daniel B. Levine
Brenda Longfellow
Patricia P. Matsen
Stephanie A. McCarter & Daniel S. Holmes
John F. Miller
Richard G. Peterson
Cynthia K. Phillips
Stephanie M. Pope
John R. Porter
Calliopi Ratcliff
Kenneth J. Reckford
James S. Ruebel
James P. Sandrock
Robert H. Simmons
David W. Tandy
Theodore A. Tarkow
Ann E. Werner
William C. West, III


Total Received: $3207

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CAMWS Committee Lists, 2014-2015


Executive Committee:
Ruth Scodel
Antonios C. Augoustakis
Monica S. Cyrino
Thomas J. Sienkewicz
Laurel Fulkerson
John C. Gruber-Miller
Stephanie A. McCarter
Barbara P. Weinlich
Andromache Karanika
Alden Smith
Nicoletta Villa-Sella
Keely K. Lake
Catherine C. Keane
James J. O'Hara 
University of Michigan
U. of Illinois, Urbana Champaign
University of New Mexico
Monmouth College
Florida State University
Cornell College
Sewanee: The U. of the South
Eckerd College
University of California, Irvine
Baylor University
The Linsly School
Wayland Academy
Washington University in St. Louis
U. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill 
President
President Elect
Immediate Past President
Secretary-Treasurer
Ed., Classical Journal
Ed., Teaching Classical Languages
Ed., CAMWS Newsletter
Chair, CPL
Chair, Finance Comm.
Chair, Membership Comm.
Chair, Steering Comm.
Member-at-Large
Member-at-Large
Member-at-Large 

Program Committee:
Ruth Scodel
Antonios C. Augoustakis
Anatole Mori
Zina Giannopoulou
Alison R. Futrell
Eric K. Dugdale
Jeremy S. Hartnett
Marilyn Skinner
University of Michigan
U. of Illinois, Urbana Champaign
University of Missouri
University of California, Irvine
University of Arizona
Gustavus Adolphus College
Wabash College
University of Arizona 
2015 (Chair)
2015
2015
2016
2016
2016
2016
2017 

Committee for the Promotion of Latin:
Barbara P. Weinlich
Robert W. Cape, Jr.
Nicholas B. Young
James C. McKeown
Megan O. Drinkwater
Tyler Lansford
David B. Wharton 
Eckerd College
Austin College
U. of Detroit Jesuit High School
University of Wisconsin
Agnes Scott College
University of Colorado
U. of North Carolina, Greensboro 
2016 (Chair)
2015
2015
2015
2016
2016
2017 

Development Committee:
Peter E. Knox
John F. Miller
John C. Gruber-Miller
Niall W. Slater
Tyler Jo Smith
Marilyn B. Skinner 
University of Colorado, Boulder
University of Virginia
Cornell College
Emory University
University of Virginia
University of Arizona
2016 (Chair)
2015
2015
2015
2016
2016 

Finance Committee:
Andromache Karanika
Brent M. Froberg
Jenny Strauss Clay
John Marincola
Angeliki Tzanetou
David J. Schenker
Thomas J. Sienkewicz
University of California, Irvine
Baylor University
University of Virginia
Florida State University
U. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
University of Missouri
Monmouth College 
2016 (Chair)
2015
2015
2015
2016
2016
ex officio 

Membership Committee:
Alden Smith
Randall L. Childree
Anne H. Groton
Rebecca Futo Kennedy
Roger T. MacFarlane
Douglas C. Clapp
Lauren S. Rogers 
Baylor University
Furman University
St. Olaf College
Denison University
Brigham Young University
Samford University
Salem Academy 
2016 (Chair)
2015
2015
2016
2016
2016
2017 

Merit Committee:
James M. May
Daniel Levine
Carin M. Green
Julia D. Hejduk
Gregory N. Daugherty
James V. Lowe
Susan C. Shelmerdine 
St. Olaf College
University of Arkansas
University of Iowa
Baylor University
Randolph-Macon College
John Burroughs School
U. of North Carolina, Greensboro 
2015 (Chair, Orator)
2015
2015
2016
2016
2017
2017 

Nominating Committee:
Monica S. Cyrino
Vassiliki Panoussi
Timothy Winters
Eleni Manolaraki
Christine G. Perkell
James A. Andrews
Chris Ann Matteo 
University of New Mexico
College of William and Mary
Austin Peay State University
University of South Florida
Emory University
Ohio University
Washington Latin Public Charter 
2015
2015
2015
2016
2016
2017
2017 

Resolutions Committee:
Geoffrey W. Bakewell
Sandra L. Blakely
Kristin O. Lord
Angeline C. Chiu
Kirk Sanders
Kristopher F.B. Fletcher 
Rhodes College
Emory University
Wilfred Laurier University
University of Vermont
U. of Illinois, Urbana Champaign
Louisiana State University 
2017 (Chair)
2015
2015
2016
2016
2017 

Subcommittee on Publications:
Ruth Scodel
Monica S. Cyrino
Laurel Fulkerson
Joel P. Christensen
John C. Gruber-Miller
Stephanie A. McCarter
Thomas J. Sienkewicz 
University of Michigan
University of New Mexico
Florida State University
University of Texas, San Antonio
Cornell College
Sewanee: The U. of the South
Monmouth College 
President
Immediate Past President
Ed., The Classical Journal
Ed., Classical Journal Online
Ed., Teaching Classical Languages
Ed., CAMWS Newsletter
Secretary-Treasurer 

History Committee:
Ward W. Briggs
Anne H. Groton
Justin M. Schwamm
Ippokratis Kantzios
Thomas J. Sienkewicz 
University of South Carolina
St. Olaf College
Massey Hill Classical High School
University of South Florida
Monmouth College
2015 (Chair)
2016
2016
2017
ex officio

Steering Committee on Awards and Scholarships:
Nicoletta Villa-Sella
Christina A. Clark
Robert T. White
Osman S. Umurhan
John L. Friend
Heather Vincent
Peter J. Anderson
Sandra Blakely
Helena R. Dettmer
Thomas J. Sienkewicz 
The Linsly School
Creighton University
Shaker Heights High School
University of New Mexico
University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Eckerd College
Grand Valley State University
Emory University
University of Iowa
Monmouth College 
2015 (Chair)
First Book Award
School Awards
Semple, Grant, & Benario
Stewart Undergraduate Awards
Stewart Training/Travel Awards
Kraft/CAMWS Teaching
Excavation/Field School
Ladislaus J. Bolchazy Award
ex officio 

Subcommittee on the Semple, Grant, and Benario Travel Awards:
Osman S. Umurhan
Ariana E. Traill
Robert J. Sklenar
Joel P. Christensen
Diane J. Rayor
Ian N. Hochberg 
University of New Mexico
U. of Illinois, Urbana Champaign
University of Tennessee, Knoxville
University of Texas, San Antonio
Grand Valley State University
St. Stephen's & St. Agnes School 
2015 (Chair)
2015
2015
2016
2017
2017 

Subcommittee on the CAMWS First Book Award:
Christina A. Clark
Jennifer L. Larson
Andrew T. Faulkner
Kyle Harper
Joseph L. Rife
Jane W. Crawford 
Creighton University
Kent State University
University of Waterloo, Ontario
University of Oklahoma
Vanderbilt University
University of Virginia 
2015 (Chair)
2016
2016
2016
2017
2017 

Subcommittee on the School Awards:
Robert T. White
Nick L. Fletcher
Ryan G. Sellers
Jason S. Nethercut
George F. Franko
Amy K. Leonard
William S. Duffy
Krishni Burns 
Shaker Heights High School
Hawken School
Memphis University School
Knox College
Hollins University
Tucker High School
University of Texas, San Antonio
BASIS San Antonio 
2015 (Chair)
2015
2015
2015
2015
2015
2016
2017 

Subcommittee on the Stewart Undergraduate Awards:
John L. Friend
Sophie Mills
Max L. Goldman
Timothy Heckenlively
Michael G. Seaman
Eddie R. Lowry, Jr.  
University of Tennessee, Knoxville
U. of North Carolina, Asheville
Vanderbilt University
Baylor University
DePauw University
Ripon College 
2015 (Chair)
2016
2016
2016
2016
2017 

Subcommittee on the Stewart Training and Travel Awards:
Heather Vincent
Loreno F. Garcia, Jr.
Simon Burris
Julie Langford
Robin C. Anderson
Elizabeth Rief 
Eckerd College
University of New Mexico
Baylor University
University of South Florida
Phoenix Country Day School
Summit School 
2016 (Chair)
2016
2016
2016
2017
2017 

Subcommittee on the Teaching Awards (Kraft and CAMWS):
Jennifer Fotsch Austino
Ian Worthington
Garrett A. Jacobsen
Mary L. B. Pendergraft
Howard W. Chang
Louise Hl Pratt
Michele Bertaud
Bartolo A. Natoli 
Brookfield East High School
University of Missouri
Denison University
Wake Forest University
Flint High School
Emory University
Carmel Catholic Latin High School
Randolph-Macon College 
2015 (Chair)
2015
2016
2016
2016
2017
2017
2017 

Subcommittee on the Excavation and Field School Award:
Sandra L. Blakely
Barbara Tsakirgis
Amy Sowder-Koch 
Emory University
Vanderbilt University
Towson University 
2016 (Chair)
2016
2016 

Subcommittee on the Ladislaus J. Bolchazy Pedagogy Book Award:
Helena R. Dettmer
Barbara Weiden Boyd
Mark A. Haynes 
University of Iowa
Bowdoin College
Creighton Preparatory School
2016 (Chair)
2016
2016

Historian
Ward W. Briggs
University of South Carolina
2015

Photographer
Georgia L. Irby
College of William and Mary
2015

CAMWS Representative to the Federation of the Societies of Classical Studies:
Max L. Goldman
Vanderbilt University
2016

CAMWS Social Media Director and Webmaster:
Bartolo A. Natoli
Randolph-Macon College
2017

Graduate Student Issues Committee (affiliated with CAMWS):
Sarah Teets
Stephen Kiepke
Jennifer LaFleur
Robert H. Simmons 
University of Virginia
Florida State University
University of Virginia
Monmouth College 
Chair


CAMWS Liaison to GSIC 

CAMWS State, Provincial, and Regional  
Vice-Presidents 2014-2015

Canada Region
   Manitoba
   Ontario
   Saskatchewan

Gulf Region
   Alabama
   Louisiana
   Mississippi
   Texas

Lake Michigan Region
   Illinois
   Indiana
   Michigan

Northern Plains Region
   Minnesota
   North Dakota
   South Dakota
   Wisconsin

Ohio Valley Region
   Ohio
   West Virginia

Plains Region
   Iowa
   Kansas
   Missouri
   Nebraska
   Oklahoma

Rocky Mountain Region
   Arizona
   Colorado
   Nevada
   New Mexico
   Utah
   Wyoming

Southeast Region
   Florida
   Georgia
   South Carolina

Tidewater Region
   North Carolina
   Virginia

Upper South Region
   Arkansas
   Kentucky
   Tennessee

At-Large Region
Andrew Faulkner
C. Michael Sampson
Lisa Trentin
John R. Porter

Davina McClain
P. Andrew Montgomery
Wilfred E. Major
Mark Edward Clark
Deborah Beck

Mark S. Thorne
Emil A. Kramer
Michael D. Dixon
Anise K. Strong

Lorina N. Quartarone
Clara S. Hardy
David L. Volk
Rocki Wentzel
Jeffrey S. Beneker

Gwen L. Compton-Engle
Zara M. Torlone
E. Del Chrol

Marcia H. Lindgren
John Gruber-Miller
Cheryl L. Golden
David J. Schenker
Mark A. Haynes
John H. Hansen

Lorenzo F. Garcia
Jared Copeland
Brian M. Duvick
Susan O. Shapiro
Osman Umurhan
Susan O. Shapiro
Laura A. De Lozier

Hunter Gardner
James Sickinger
Amy K. Leonard
Randall Childree

Keyne A. Cheshire
T.H.M. Gellar-Goad
Trudy Harrington Becker

Christopher P. Craig
Maureen R. Stover
Marcie Handler
Edward G. Long

Stacie Raucci
University of Waterloo, ON
University of Manitoba
University of Toronto
University of Saskatchewan

Louisiana Scholars' College
Samford University
Louisiana State University
Mississippi State University
University of Texas at Austin

Wheaton College
Augustana College
University of Southern Indiana
Western Michigan University

University of St. Thomas
Carleton College
Fargo North High School
Augustana College
University of Wisconsin

John Carroll University
Miami University
Marshall University

University of Iowa
Cornell College
Newman University
U. of Missouri, Columbia
Creighton Prep. High School
University of Oklahoma

University of New Mexico
Scottsdale Prep. Academy
U. of Colorado, Colorado Springs
Utah State University
University of New Mexico
Utah State University
University of Wyoming

University of South Carolina
Florida State University
The Walker School
Furman University

Davidson College
Wake Forest University
Virginia Tech

U. of Tennessee, Knoxville
Mt. St. Mary's Academy
Covington Latin School
Clarksville High School

Union College
Individual Membership in CAMWS

 

Individual membership in CAMWS for the fiscal year July 1, 2014 through June 30, 2015, may be purchased for $55 ($30 for student, retiree, first-time teacher, or new CAMWS member). Joint spouse/partner membership is available for $80, retired spouse/partner membership for $50. A life membership costs $1000 for an individual and $1400 for joint spouse/partner.  

 

A membership includes a one-year subscription to The Classical Journal. Please indicate on the membership form whether you would prefer to receive CJ electronically (via JSTOR) or in print. For an extra $5 you may receive the journal in both formats. Please note that membership in CAMWS provides electronic subscription only to the current volume of CJ. CAMWS members wishing to have access to back issues of the journal can do so at a special rate through JStor. Please contact Tom Sienkewicz at stcamws@camws.org for additional information.

 

The CAMWS Newsletter is sent electronically to all members with e-mail addresses. If you would like to receive a print version in addition, you may indicate that on the membership form.

 

As part of your CAMWS membership, you are automatically subscribed to Classical Journal On-Line from which you will received frequent reviews of new books in the classical field, unless you indicate on the membership form that you opt out of this subscription.

 

Please note: Individual memberships or subscriptions to CJ sent to an address outside the United States or Canada are subject to a $20 postage surcharge. Individual subscriptions automatically include membership in CAMWS.

 

You may use the CAMWS membership form to join ACL or SALVI, subscribe to any of eight other scholarly journals, order a copy of Herbert Benario's CAMWS: A History of the First Eighty Years, purchase various CAMWS merchandise (including 6-inch 'Roman' rulers, a CAMWS YoYo, shot glasses or koozies) and/or make a tax-deductible contribution to CAMWS.

 

If you are already a CAMWS member and wish to order CAMWS memorabilia or subscribe to other journals, please use this Miscellaneous Order Form.

 

How to Join or Renew Your Membership

 

Payment by credit card is possible through the CAMWS web site:  www.camws.org/membership/memberinfo.  A $3 processing fee will be added to each credit-card transaction.


You many also pay your CAMWS membership by using this Membership Form and sending a check or money order drawn on a U.S. bank or a bank that uses U.S. routing codes to:

 

CAMWS

Monmouth College 

700 E. Broadway

Monmouth, IL 61462

 

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Institutional Membership in CAMWS 

If your educational institution becomes a member of CAMWS, it receives the following benefits:

  • One CAMWS award for an outstanding student to be chosen by your institution. The student receives a congratulatory certificate stating that your school has designated the student as a recipient of a CAMWS Award for Outstanding Accomplishment in Classical Studies for the current academic year, plus a free membership in CAMWS for the following academic year. To designate your student honoree(s), please complete the on-line award designation form and submit it no later than May 1st for each academic year.
  • The option to choose up to two additional student award recipients ($30 each). Payment required by May 1st of each academic year.
  • A certificate stating your institution's support of CAMWS
  • Eligibility for your students to compete in the CAMWS Sight Translation Contests
  • Publication of institutional announcements free of charge in the CAMWS Newsletter and on the CAMWS website.
  • For K-12 Institutional Members, one complimentary registration at the CAMWS Annual Meeting (not including the banquet)
  • Inclusion on the list of CAMWS Member Institutions, which will be
    • printed in the program of the CAMWS Annual Meeting (if membership is received prior to the printing of the meeting program)
    • printed in the CAMWS Newsletter (if membership is received by May 1st)
    • posted on the CAMWS Website (with hotlinks to the websites of institutional members)

Institutional membership also supports CAMWS awards and scholarships and efforts to promotion Classics in the CAMWS region.

 

To become an institutional member, go here: How To Become An Institutional Member.

 

For further information, please contact stcamws@camws.org.

 

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Classics in the News

On October 27, NPR published a story entitled Gladiator Gatorade?.

On October 10, Discovery ran a piece entitled Remains of Alexander the Great's Father Confirmed Found.

On September 24, The Guardian published a piece called The New Socrates?

On September 23, National Geographic ran a story on Amazon Warriors' Names on Ancient Greek Vases.

In September, National Geographic published a story called Rethinking Nero.

In July, Mental Floss ran a story on 20 Latin Phrases You Should Be Using.

On July 5, Forbes published a story entitled What Rome's Arch-Enemies Wore Into Battle.

For even more links to Classics-related stories, like our Facebook page.

Obitus Recentes

Carin Allen, Latin teacher at Rolla High School in Missouri, passed away on October 10, 2014.  An obituary can be found by clicking here.

Sheila J. McNally, Professor Emerita the University of Minnesota, passed away on September 25, 2014.  An obituary can be found by clicking here.

Paul. B. Harvey, Jr., an Associate Professor at Penn State University, passed away on July 13, 2014.  An obituary can be found here and a remembrance here.

Stephen G. Daitz, Professor Emeritus at the City University of New York, passed away on June 19, 2014.  An obituary may be found by clicking here.

Diskin William Clay, Professor at Duke University, passed away on June 9, 2014.  An obituary can be found by clicking here.

Go here for a necrology blog where you can leave comments, anecdotes, and other loving remembrances of CAMWS members who have died. Go to Necrology of CAMWS Members for a list of deceased members of CAMWS.

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Corrigendum

There was an error in the Winter 2014 edition of the CAMWS Newsletter under the list of the Latin Translation Contest winners.  The teacher for Emily Ho, recipient of a letter of commendation, was incorrectly listed as Emily McQuaid.  The correct teachers are Chris Cudabac, Karen McQuaid, and Lawrence Wall.
Submissions

The CAMWS Newsletter is published three times per year, in the fall, winter, and spring/summer.  The deadline for the winter edition is January 15, 2015. 

Send submissions by email to newsletter@camws.org.

Send submissions by regular mail to:

Stephanie McCarter
CAMWS Newsletter Editor
Department of Classical Languages
Sewanee: The University of the South
735 University Ave.
Sewanee, TN 37383

If you have questions, email or call 931-598-1221.