Pyramid of Potential

 

 

Reading #3

 

 

 

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June 17, 2015

 

Hey Folks!

 

For some school is done for the year. For others it is almost out. And some are looking at summer school. No matter what your plans are for the next few months, there is nothing that could be more important than learning to read well.

 

Two newsletters ago we reviewed 3 essential elements to reading. Last week we looked at how the many aspects of vision relate to the ability to read. If you want to read past newsletters, just go to http://www.pyramidofpotential.com/read-newsletters/.

 

This week we look at how auditory processing - not hearing - relates to learning to read.

  

Brain Advancement Training is starting July 1st. Be sure to sign up if you are interested, time is almost up. Head over to Brainadvancementteam.com for more information. Contact us if you are interested or have some questions.

 

Thank you so much! Kathy

7 Visual Blocks to Reading 

 

 

Phonemes

Phonemes are sounds that we humans make, that make up our words in our language. The English language has 44 sounds, according to Diane McGuiness who wrote "Why Your Child Can't Read and What You Can Do About It". The term Phonemic Awareness refers to the ability to use sounds for reading - identifying, blending, separating (segmenting), and manipulating them.

 

Yet, we rarely think about sounds; we use words to speak, and when we read well, we read words very quickly. It is when we are learning to read that we really need to know about the sounds of the language. We have been listening to sounds since before we were born, so it is more natural to learn how to read using sounds than letters. Before we can attach sounds to letters, we have to be able to hear and process sounds.

 

Auditory Processing Problems

There is a difference between hearing and processing sounds. Some of the people who have an auditory processing problems hear very well! As a matter of fact, many of them have such hypersensitivity to sound that they score very high on a hearing test. Unfortunately, the scoring high may indicate that they are so sensitive to sound that hear everything at a very loud volume, and cannot separate out the sounds. They may hear the teacher, but the other sounds in the classroom, such as the buzzing of the lights, the blower, people writing, whispering and the chairs squeaking, all contribute to their inability to hear ONLY the teacher.

 

Other problems with an auditory processing disorder would be:

1.      To not understanding rhyming

2.      To get sounds out of sequence

                  For example, to say bisketti instead of spaghetti

3.      To not be able to "hear" the difference between sounds that are similar:

                  Short vowel sounds

                  The sounds made by the letters s, f, sh, and ch

                  The sounds made by the letters m and n

4.       To mishear sounds, requiring a person to have to think about what was said and make sense of it. For example, the person may think they heard elephant, but the word telephone makes more sense in the paragraph. It takes a couple of seconds to do this, so the person may say "what?" frequently in order to get a little more time to process.

 

Diagnosis of Auditory Processing Disorder

A diagnosis of auditory processing disorder is obtained by an audiologist and the subject of the testing must be at least 7 years old. Typically, if a diagnosis is found several accommodations are suggested which can be implemented by the school. Preferential seating and giving more written instructions are typical.

 

What to do

Although there is no cure for an auditory processing disorder, many steps can be made to improve the auditory processing and possibly the accommodations will no longer be needed. I have seen this with many of my clients.

 

Setting up the brain to process sounds

If the problem is not hearing loss and it is truly an auditory processing disorder, it probably has been there since infancy. If so, this means it is a developmental issue - the ability to process sounds never developed in the first place. With my clients, the first step is always to recreate the stages in infancy that were missed or only partially completed. These stages in infancy are called primitive reflexes.

 

Primitive Reflexes

  Auditory hypersensitivity - comes from a "retained Moro Reflex" and can be helped by doing the exercise from the video https://youtu.be/fQ4K9sw7by8

   Auditory processing - comes from a "retained Spinal Galant reflex". This and other reflexes/stages of development can be taken care of by doing the exercises from Maintaining Brains Everyday DVD which can be found at www.pyramidofpotential.com/store

 

Setting up the auditory system to process sounds

Once the brain is set up to process sounds through the integration of the primitive reflexes, it is much more likely that therapy designed to stimulate the auditory system will work more effectively, efficiently, and last long-term. I have seen clients whose therapy did not stick more than 6 months when the primitive reflex work was not done first.

 

There are several therapies currently that stimulate the auditory system. Some are done in a clinical setting, some are done at school or at home, and some are done on-line. Although there are some differences, and some may have better results than others, the best one for you is the one that is accessible and affordable.

 

Listening Therapies, in alphabetic order:

Auditory Integration Therapy

Interactive Listening Systems

International Sound Synergy

The Listening Program

Therapeutic Listening

Tomatis

 

This may not be inclusive, as new therapies are developed all of the time.

 

Use a curriculum that directly teaches the phonemic awareness

Growing Brains Everyday is a curriculum that was written with the teacher and parent in mind. It includes the DVD Maintaining Brains Everyday for reflexes, and 150 days of specific lesson that take 10 minutes a day. There is full phonemic awareness, some vision exercises, plus other activities to improve working memory, processing speed, writing and math. You can find it at http://www.pyramidofpotential.com/store/.

 

The final piece of this whole puzzle is to find a great program that will put it all together. Perhaps a local tutor or learning center. Or your school has the best in reading methodology. It is always best to work with a professional, but if can't for some reason, a good resource is Reading Reflex  - a book with a method that works quickly, once the other problems have been fixed. The author is McGuinness.

 

This is a great time to improve the ability to read! Enjoy it!!

 

 

 

 

June Conference - Don't Miss It!!

Saratoga Jazz Festival: http://www.spac.org/freihofers-saratoga-jazz-festival

Consider a vacation in Saratoga Springs, New York!

June 28 - The Plastic Brain:

Improving Memory, Attention, Processing Speed and More

Registration is at www.tinyurl.com/plasticbrain

Save by registering before May 15!!

 

Throughout the day, Ms. Johnson will train participants in exactly how to remediate some of the most difficult problems that are a result of incomplete brain development in infancy. However, as she likes to say, there is no silver bullet! Each child is an individual who will require a unique approach.

Ms. Johnson will describe a model where the emphasis changes from spending increasingly more time and energy on academics to incorporating brain development into early childhood, special education, and regular education classrooms, freeing up the teacher to teach more academics as a result.

She will share the results from an elementary school in Wisconsin who is implementing these methods with significant cognitive improvements in less than a year! "the improvement in the classroom has been the best news that we hear" Wisconsin Teacher Ryan McBurney


 

The Developing Brain and Case Histories

Body and Mind Health, and the effect on brain development

     Nutrition, Stress, Exercise, Sleep

Neurodevelopmental Stages; Why Cognitive Skills never Developed

     Primitive Reflexes

     Symptoms and Integration exercises

     Incorporating reflex exercises into the school day

Sensory Development

     Auditory Processing

       Symptoms of an auditory processing disorder

       What to do

     Visual Processing

       Tracking and Convergence Screening

       Simple eye exercises

       Irlen Syndrome and Colored Overlays

       Vision Therapy

Cognitive Skills Development

     Phonemic Awareness

     Attention

     Memory

     Logic and reasoning

     Processing speed

Integrating brain development into school day without losing precious academic time

 

June 29 - Primitive Reflexes:

Foundation for Learning

Registration is at www.tinyurl.com/primreflex

Save by registering before May 15!!

 

 

The primitive reflexes have been around as long as people have been around. They are present primarily to force the infant to move the body in such ways that it develops and matures to survive. The additional benefit, as humans, is that along with motor movements, many other brain components are developing that help with academics: the visual system, the auditory system, the ability to concentrate, remember, and understand.

 

Several people have commented that they believe this is the missing link. And indeed, in my experience since 2000, I have found that the integration of the primitive reflexes to be one of the least expensive and most effective therapies today.

 

 "I have a student that a year ago was basically a selective mute on the Autistic Spectrum.  I have put a lot of work in class working in the Moro and can report that she changed like a light switch coming on.  She is speaking in class, she will transition independently, is reading basic readers, and is exhibiting significantly fewer behaviors to the point that we may be removing the 1:1 behavioral specialist from her IEP." - California Teacher Mark Steiner


 

Introduction

     Case histories

     History of Reflex Integration

     Research

     Primitive reflexes guidelines

     Beyond Primitive Reflexes

Moro Reflex:

      Symptoms, Testing, Integration

Palmar Reflex:

      Symptoms, Testing, Integration

Tonic Labyrinthine Reflex:

      Symptoms, Testing, Integration

Spinal Galant:

      Symptoms, Testing, Integration

Asymmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex:

      Symptoms, Testing, Integration

Symmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex:

      Symptoms, Testing, Integration

 

NOTE: Please bring a yoga mat or blanket plus a small pillow and wear comfortable clothes as we will be practicing on the floor

Contact Us
Kathy Johnson, MS Ed
kjohnson@pyramidofpotential.com

Bob Johnson
bobjohnson@pyramidofpotential.com

Pyramid of Potential
245 Washington St #3369
Saratoga Springs, NY 12866
518-260-3937

Take a Look!
Video of the Week!

Reading: 3 Amazing Activities
This video goes over the actual reasons behind reading failure. It's not the teacher; it's not the method; it's not motivation. actually, a child's brain must be set up for the ability to process all the different things that contribute to good reading skills, including being able to process sounds well - for decoding - and vision skills to be able to process letters and words on the page. Also important are vocabulary and language skills, processing speed, memory and visualization for comprehension. Watch this video all the way through to understand what can be done!!
This video goes over the actual reasons behind reading failure. It's not the teacher; it's not the method; it's not motivation. actually, a child's brain must be set up for the ability to process all the different things that contribute to good reading skills, including being able to process sounds well - for decoding - and vision skills to be able to process letters and words on the page. Also important are vocabulary and language skills, processing speed, memory and visualization for comprehension. Watch this video all the way through to understand what can be done!!

Upcoming Local Presentations

Improving Reading When Reading Methods Don't Work Well Enough 

June 18, 6:30 - 8:30

63 Putnam Street, Saratoga Springs, NY 12866

 

Improving Handwriting and Composition Abilities
 

August 20. 6:30 - 8:30

63 Putnam Street, Saratoga Springs, NY 12866

 

Improving Math and Word Problems When the Methods Don't Work Well Enough
 

September 17, 6:30 - 8:30

63 Putnam Street, Saratoga Springs, NY 12866

 

Where's Kathy?

It is now time to set up your professional development at your school - Kathy is available for many dates this Fall! Call now to secure YOUR date!

 

Below are the upcoming workshops that Kathy Johnson is giving. If she is not coming to your area, why not hire her for your next professional development?

   

  Kathy Johnson Photo 2010


Wednesday, September 23, 2015 in WHITE PLAINS, NY 
Speaker: KATHY JOHNSON, MS ED
Early Registration: $189.99 

Thursday, September 24, 2015 in PLAINVIEW, NY
Speaker: KATHY JOHNSON, MS ED
Early Registration: $189.99 

Friday, September 25, 2015 in MANHATTAN, NY
Speaker: KATHY JOHNSON, MS ED
Early Registration: $189.99 

If you aren't near any of these on-site professional development conferences, consider the following:

 

Dyslexia, Dyscalculia & Dysgraphia: An Integrated Approach   Price: $169.99  Author: Kathy Johnson, MS Ed.  Format: DVD