Jan Hamilton, MS, PMHNP, 
Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner

Doorways LLC.


 1825 E. Northern Ave. 

Suite 200

Phoenix, AZ 85020

 

(602) 997-2880  

 

A Note from Jan
Founder of Doorways 

It isn't uncommon for children and teens to be anxious about social situations and interactions as they move through the different stages from child to adult.  

 

Given that their bodies are constantly changing, the hormonal effects of puberty, and the rapid succession of milestones these adolescents are going through, it is no wonder that they don't always feel comfortable and worry about how other people are perceiving them. But for some adolescents and teens, the common anxiety experienced at these stages can become all encompassing and even debilitating. These adolescents may develop social phobias,  also referred to as social anxiety disorder.

 

For teens with social anxiety disorder (social phobia), the fear of rejection, humiliation, being embarrassed, or having others develop a negative opinion of them becomes excessive. This makes anything requiring social interaction or that singles out the child a challenge and can lead to avoiding interactions altogether. Adolescents with social anxiety disorder have difficulty meeting new people, standing up to give a report or solve a problem in front of the class, participating in physical activities and sporting events, and even doing things that seem simple like eating in public.

 

If you know an adolescent or young adult (age 12-25) who is struggling with social anxiety, we have several ways we can help including our OCD/Anxiety IOPs as well as individual and family sessions with anxiety experts on our staff. Contact us to find out how we help! 

 

Click here to read more about what parents need to know.

 

Jan Hamilton, PMHNP-BC
Founder, Doorways, LLC

 

Jan@doorwaysarizona.com

 

 

PS. We are growing! We are looking to hire part time Arizona Licensed Counselors! Click link below to help us spread the word!

 

 


OPEN ENROLLMENT IOPs: SIGN UP ANY TIME!
Young Adult OCD/Anxiety Disorders IOP

Who:  Males and females, ages 18-25. This program is open enrollment (you may join at any time).

 

What Small group format for young adults who are struggling with OCD (Obsessive Compulsive Disorder), social phobia, or extreme fears.

 

WhenTuesdays  4:30-7:30 PM, Wednesdays, 4:30-7:30 PM, and Fridays, 3:00-6:00 PM

 

Where Doorways, 1825 E. Northern Ave, Suite 200, Phoenix, Arizona 85020

 

How:  Email Susan@doorwaysarizona.com or call Doorways, (602) 997-2880

 

The Young Adult  OCD/Anxiety Disorders IOP, exclusively for ages 18-25, is the only one of its kind in the state of Arizona!

 

We have Psychologists and Certified OCD/Anxiety Disorders specialists leading our IOP. For those young adults that suffer with the effects of OCD and severe anxiety in their lives, this will be of great benefit towards overcoming their symptoms.

 

 


Adolescent OCD/Anxiety Disorder IOP

 

Who:  Males and Females, ages 12-17.  This program is open enrollment (you may join at any time).

 

What Small group format good for adolescents who are struggling with OCD (Obsessive Compulsive Disorder), extreme social phobia, extreme fears, and have difficulty talking to people.

 

WhenMondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays, 4:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.  Please call the office for details.

 

Where Doorways, 1825 E. Northern Ave, Suite 200, Phoenix, Arizona 85020

 

How:  Email Susan@doorwaysarizona.com or call Doorways, (602) 997-2880


 
We also have an Adolescent Eating Disorders IOP for males and females ages 13-18. It is 3 days per week, a total of 10 hours per week. Open enrollment, join any time. 

 

If you know anyone who may benefit from either of these specialty programs, please don't hesitate to give us a call at 602.997.2880.

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BLOG POSTS

For some adolescents and teens, the common anxiety experienced at these stages of life can become all encompassing and even debilitating. An estimate from the National Institute of Mental Health indicates that about 12% of those adolescents who call themselves shy may actually have social phobias.

It is normal for teenagers to experience anxiety as they make the transition to adulthood. However, when the anxiety centers on social interactions or relationships it can impose unnecessary limitations on our teenager's lives. Whether your teenager's social anxiety is severe or not, here are some things you can do to provide a supportive environment.

Shyness is completely normal. But a racing heart and stomach full of butterflies can signify something more than just normal shyness. Some adolescents are dealing with a type of anxiety about social situations that goes beyond being uncomfortable; they are dealing with a disorder called social phobia.
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