Love for your tastebuds and tummy

On this, the day of love, we urge you to show your taste buds and tummy the love of pork. These heart healthy recipes will dance across your tongue and provide not only a meal, but an experience to share with the ones you love. 

BBQ Roasted Pork Tenderloin Stuffed with Braised Collard Greens & Caramelized Onions 
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 1 hour, 25 minutes
Servings: 4 - 5 

1 pound pork tenderloin
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 cup onion, chopped
1/4 cup red bell pepper, finely chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
1/8 teaspoon sea salt, to taste
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1 cup chicken stock, low-sodium 
1/2 cup stout beer, *
1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
1 tablespoon honey
1 pound collard greens, washed and cut
1 tablespoon nonfat cream cheese
1 teaspoon hot pepper sauce
1 1/2 cups Apple-Infused BBQ Sauce, OR your favorite jarred BBQ sauce
Toothpicks 

Cooking Directions 

In a heavy pot, add oil and onions and cook over medium heat until caramelized. Add red peppers, garlic, sea salt and black pepper. Cook for about 2 minutes. Add chicken stock, beer, vinegar and honey and bring liquid to a boil. Add greens to liquid. Cook for about 45 minutes to an hour or until tender. Remove pot from heat and drain remaining liquid. Add cream cheese and hot sauce and stir. While greens cook, prepare pork tenderloin. Butterfly your pork tenderloin cutting a slit down the middle. Do not cut through the pork. Cover the pork with plastic wrap; pound with the flat side of a meat mallet until about 1/2 inch thick, starting from the middle and working outward. Discard plastic wrap. Spread the collard green mixture over the tenderloin and tightly roll. Secure the seams with toothpicks. Place pork in a baking dish and brush liberally with Apple-Infused BBQ Sauce. Bake in a 350 degree preheated oven for 25-30 minutes or until internal temperature has reached 145 degrees. Let pork rest for 5 minutes.     

  

BBQ Blade Steak Papillotes
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 1 hour
Servings: 4
 
blade pork steaks
onion, thinly sliced
lime, thinly sliced
1/4 cup barbecue sauce, commercial or homemade
vegetable oil, for brushing meat
salt and pepper
4 large squares heavy duty foil 
 
Cooking Directions
Cut each blade steak into four chunks of approximately equal size.  Salt and pepper the steak and brush with vegetable oil.  
Heat grill and season grill with towel dipped in vegetable oil (use tongs for safety). Cook the pork pieces on the grill just enough to char both sides (about 1-2 minutes per side).  In the center of each foil square, divide the onion and lime slices, layering them evenly into four portions.  Divide the pork among the foil pieces and top each with a tablespoon of barbecue sauce.  Close up the foil packets, leaving space between foil and meat for steam to circulate, but folded tightly to keep steam in.  Cook foil packets on the grill over indirect heat for 45-60 minutes, or until the internal temperature reaches 155 degree F.  Serve each person their own barbecue packet along with a grilled bun or baguette. 
A lasting legacy in the pork industry

 

Stepping into someone else's shoes can be the beginning of a trip anywhere. Stepping into Chuck and Wathina Luthi's shoes is a trip going everywhere. There is a minimal amount of area in the Oklahoma pork industry their shoes haven't traveled. It is with great honor that okPORK announces Chuck and Wathina as the 2014 okPORK Hall of Fame inductees.

 

Chuck and Wathina's contribution to the pork industry in Oklahoma began before they met, even before they were born. The two met in college, but before then both of their families had been involved in raising pigs. When the young couple moved to Woodward and Chuck took a job working in town, Wathina needed something to keep her busy at home.

 

"I told him he needed to find something to keep me busy or I was going to get a job in town," Wathina said. "So we got two pigs - and we were excited. We got two sows and started there."

 

As time went on the Luthi's operation grew. They bought an old granary, a chicken house and several other buildings and converted them when they began to expand. More and more work was needed to keep the farm running.

 

Soon the industry began to change. The  farrow-to-finish operation they had run for the last several years was no longer working. At that point they began to pursue a contract with a larger company and found that opportunity with Murphy Farms.

 

"In the early 1990s, south of Woodward, we were a 125 head farrow-to-finish operation," Wathina said. "We ground our own feed, marketed the animals and everything. After contracting with Murphy we built the 3,650 head sow unit. It was farrow-to-wean with on-site guilt replacement."

 

The Luthi's farm has held contracts with several companies throughout the years but now they contract with The Maschhoffs. Their farm is slightly larger and they now have a 4,900 head sow farm. Their weaned baby pigs mostly travel north to Iowa to grow to market size.

 

Both Chuck and Wathina have been active off the farm as well. No matter whether serving on committes and boards or talking with kids and neighbors they not only volunteer but go above and beyond to accomplish what is needed.

 

It is an honor and a pleasure for okPORK to be able to show respect to a couple who has been such a large influence to the pork industry by inducting them as the newest members of the okPORK Hall of Fame.
 

"To say this is an honor would really be short-selling it," Chuck said. "It goes beyond being an honor and I just really appreciate it. I am humbled that Wathina and I are even mentioned in the same breath as the kind of guys who have been inducted before us."                

 

 

 

About Oklahoma Pork Council

The Oklahoma Pork Council, a producer organization consisting of Oklahoma pork producers, represents the interests of all pork producers. Partially funded by federally collected Pork Checkoff dollars, okPORK promotes pork and pork products, funds research, and educates consumers and producers about the pork industry. For more information about this or any other programs of the Oklahoma Pork Council visit www.okpork.org or call 1.405.232.3781.

 
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