Michigan Family Institute Newsletter

December 2013
What We Do     Specialty Services     Staff     Contact     mifamilytherapy.com     248-593-4784
In This Issue
ADDICTION OR POWER?
THE SEASON OF GIVING
ENJOYING THE WINTER BREAK
FRIEND OUR FACEBOOK PAGE TO FOLLOW  UPDATES AND INFORMATION BY SEARCHING FACEBOOK FOR MICHIGAN FAMILY INST PC 

SEE NEW THERAPY AND EDUCATIONAL GROUPS FOLLOWING THE BOOK OFFERINGS BELOW

 
 

BOOKS 
 

(Guilford Press 1996)
Jerome A. Price
-----


(Impact Publications 2011)
Margerum J, Price J, and Windell J 
 -----


(Impact Publications 2007) 
Gaulier B, Margerum J, Price J, Windell J 

-----

 
(Zeig-Tucker Publications 2003) Price J, Margerum  J 

CLINICAL AND EDUCATIONAL GROUPS

 

  

Take Control of Your Divorce

  

Learn to manage the conflict in your divorce

  

with Dr. Judith Margerum

  

------ 

  

Circle of Friends

  

A middle school aged social skills group

 

with Lynn Ernst

Margolis,  MSW, LMSW 

------

The Right to Be the Grownup

A parent skills training program for difficult teens and pre-teens 

 

with Jerome A. Price, MA, LMFT, LMSW 

 

 

 

SPEAKERS' BUREAU 


As a courtesy to the many trusted professionals who refer to us, we offer presentations for staff development and for parents in schools or treatment programs at no charge.
Subjects are many and varied and can be coordinated with your program's needs.

Just call or email us




info@mifamilytherapy.com




ADDICTION OR POWER?

 

 Jerome A. Price, M.A.

 

 During the holidays many families experience increased concerns about addictions. Will family members who are chemically dependent or addicted act out with their drinking or drug use? People experience a lot of anxiety anticipating the action of those unpredictable drinkers and drug users.

 

Here's a helpful way to think about the problem. The alcohol or drug is certainly a problem.  However, power is a problem also. When someone develops a problem such as drinking too much they create a dynamic wherein everyone is trying to get them to stop and they refuse to let them succeed. Everyone is reacting to the substance abuser and every time they react he or she gains power. As he or she gains power their symptoms get worse. Consider the following strategy that can at least head things in the right direction.  

 

Be proactive. Make or change plans before you're in a position to have to reactively intervene in someone's substance use. If you know she'll get wasted and embarrass you at your mother's, find a reason to pass on going to your mother's this year. If there's a wedding, don't try to convince him to go with you. Go by yourself or with a friend.

 

Being proactive has one great benefit. It reduces the power the user gains from having the problem. Over time, as the symptom loses power to control others,  the chances will increase that he or she will go into their own emotional crisis and get help.

   

Finally, don't keep verbally pursuing the addict or abuser to change. Take action when the time is right. As our dog trainer taught us -- never repeat the same demand. If you ask more than once, that's called begging. 

 THE SEASON OF GIVING
    
Judith Margerum, Ph.D.

The holiday season is the time of year that people volunteer their time and money. Whether  serving meals to the homeless, packing food boxes or delivering gifts to the less fortunate , giving and volunteering increases dramatically. 
   
Dr. Sarah Konrath at UofM researches why volunteering is good for people. In her blog for the Huffington Post in September, she indicated that research suggests that volunteering reduces depression and increases a sense of well being. She suggests 3 possible reasons for these outcomes.

She believes that any activity is better for you than no activity or than sitting at home. Volunteering increases social connections which are sorely missing in our technology driven world. Finally, she suggests that helping others makes us feel good.
 
It sounds so logical and simple that you probably already "knew" this. So keep volunteering throughout the rest of the year and take your kids too. Helping others takes  our minds away from our natural tendency to be focused on ourselves and our problems. Make helping others a part of your regular routine and it may just help you cope a little better with all of those daily stressors over which we have no control. And it will make someone else's life just a little bit better. 

    

ENJOYING THE WINTER BREAK 

 Lynn Ernst Margolis, LMSW
 

Winter Break, finally.  Well deserved time to relax with family and a welcome break from routines.  Many therapists view this nice long break as a time for adolescents to "check out"  while other professionals view this as an opportunity to catch up on school assignments and missing work.  I encourage parents to use the break to teach and reinforce basic social skills.

 

During this time of the year, many families travel, receive gifts, and interact with family members.  Winter break provides a perfect opportunity to help children learn responses to social situations and settings using the real world as a form of classroom.

 

 Help your children by creating social stories.  A story might begin with, "We are going to grandma's home."  Talk about who is going to be at grandma's home, what expectations for receiving gifts, and what there might be to do once at grandma's house.  Review and provide options for annoying cousins or relatives.  With visual children, draw out scenarios several days in advance.  Rehearse scenarios several time prior to visits.  Treat "sticky" social situations with some humor to encourage different perspectives or provide your child with an emergency "code" word.  Code words come in handy when a child needs to talk and right now. 

 

Winter break, a time to relax and "chill" that  provides everyone with a chance to regroup.  A break from schoolwork helps adolescents develop a stronger ability to work once back in the school environment. As a retired school social worker, I notice children come back rested and ready to focus on schoolwork.  Winter break provides a welcome respite from school.  Consider using this time to help children learn and reinforce social skills.                                  

 PLEASE PASS THIS NEWSLETTER ALONG TO COLLEAGUES WHO MIGHT BE INTERESTED.

FORWARD IT OR USE THE SOCIAL SHARE BAR ICONS AT THE TOP.  


MICHIGAN FAMILY INSTITUTE, PC
30233 Southfield Road Suite 109
Southfield, Michigan  48076
248-593-4784