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It's odd how people (customers) who play by the rules so often receive the least attention, wait the longest, are required to jump through the most hoops, and end up being the most maligned.
 
Every rule-maker (organization) must fight the natural tendency to focus too much on the problem child and, in doing so, losing the affection of the others.

Be well, Chuck

 

Have thoughts about Design Briefing 175 (this one)? 


Have you seen my InDesign Ideabook?

315 template files in 19 different categories -- Everything from brochures, newsletters, and direct mail to packaging, calendars, and books (one CD works with both Mac and PC). Use two or three files and you'll pay for the entire book and disc...

For Adobe InDesign 
For QuarkXPress 
The Road to Success--literally

This is a favorite illustration: The Road to Success. I believe the original was published in 1913 in a music magazine titled, The Etude.

The Road to Success... 
A discussion of the poster... 
The Etude Magazine website... 
I simply don't understand this. 

 

I get a similar piece of direct mail once or twice a year. It attempts to deceive me into believing that some anonymous someone, (there is no return address or signature, just an initial), is alerting me to an article they have torn out of a newspaper--on the attached note they always say, "Thought you'd be interested!" Clearly, the purpose is to get you to call the 800 number buried in the article.

So here's the question: Why in heaven's name would anyone pursue a product or service from a firm that approaches them with a clear deception?

I'm missing something here right? 


How ink is made

It's easy to forget all of what it takes to produce print materials. Here's an interesting look at how ink is made featuring Peter Welfare, the head inkmaker at the Printing Ink Company, one of the manufacturers licensed to produce Pantone inks....

How ink is made... 
The Printing Ink Company... 
Some stats on the enormity of the print industry from Keen... 
About the Pantone Plus Series... H
10 most popular coffee shops in America and their brands

To me, branding coffee is a lot like branding wine. There are lots of wine and coffee connoisseurs but there are also many of us who, all other things being equal, look for style and packaging.

So when a recent article from Roast Magazine listed the 10 most popular coffee shops in America, my eyes perked up. It's interesting to see how differently each company (the REALLY successful ones) markets its product.

1. Café Du Monde, New Orleans, Lousiana... 
2. La Colombe Torrefaction, New York, New York... 
3. Stumptown Coffee Roasters, Coffee Shop and Café, New York, New York... 
4. Sightglass Coffee, San Francisco, California... 
5. Four Barrel Coffee, San Francisco, California... 
6. Blue Bottle Coffee, San Francisco, California... 
7. Starbucks, Seattle, Washington... 
8. Birch Coffee Coffee Shop, New York, New York... 
9. 85°C Bakery Cafe, Irvine, California... 
10. Intelligentsia Coffee, Chicago, Illinois... 
The Roast Magazine article.. 
They call it "automated micromarketing"

This is very smart design. "Automated micromarketing" provider Nimblefish creates a series of video snippets that address specific, individual issues. It then produces multiple variations of its client's presentations-each to address a specific set of choices the user provides.

For example, if the user selects A, B, and C, they are shown presentation 1. And if the user selects A, C, and F, they are shown presentation 3.

You don't need a hybrid system to do the same thing. You simple ask questions and produce a version of the video for each set of answers.

Thanks to Karla Humphrey for pointing us to it.

I suggest taking a look at the Sears Case Study under "Advisor"... 
An example of state-of-the-web design work

An impressive, media-rich website created by ad agency Mullen.

National Georgraphic's Killing Lincoln... 
The site's case study via Jon Reil, Mullen's creative director... 
Mullen's portfolio... 
BTW, the big, bold typeface Alfa Slab is available here... 
I waited until after the Super Bowl to watch the ads on YouTube
...so I didn't have to fast-forward through all that football. As Mom said, "If you don't have anything nice to say, don't say anything at all".

Adweek's 10 Best Ads of Super Bowl XLVIII: 
The fact that the tv networks are all using Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter mean one thing... Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter are not cool anymore...


The original artist's correspondence course  
In the late 1940s illustrator Albert Dorne invited a group of fellow members of the New York Society of Illustrators to create a correspondence course which came to be known as the Famous Artists School.

An early ad for the Famous Artist School... 
There were a dozen original members, among them, Norman Rockwell... 
An article from Norman Rockwell Museum: Uncovering the Treasures of the Famous Artists School Archives... 
What follows is an example of each illustrator's work. Some showing the type of material they contributed to the effort.

Albert Dorne... 
Al Parker... 
Austin Briggs... 
Fred Ludekens... 
Harold Von Schmidt... 
Peter Helck... 
Norman Rockwell... 
Jon Whitcomb... 
Ben Stahl... 
Robert Fawcett... 
George Giusti... 
Stevan Dohanos... 
About the school's annual report... 
Who is viewing your marketing message and how much do they really know and care?

I was commenting that I wasn't "feelin" the graphics from the new H&R Block ad campaign. It is a rather plain-looking border (everything is "flat" these days) with a clown-like bow tie symbol. I not only didn't understand the style, I didn't understand the bow tie reference.

When others began to speculate what the bow tie might mean, my interest was piqued... 
May I ask for your support?

I am an affiliate of several services. If you use these links to make purchases, I get a small commission. Thanks in advance for your support.

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Part of marketing is, "thank you."

I'm a creature of habit. When my wife and I find a restaurant we like, we visit it regularly. Regularly to the extent that you'd think someone would notice.

It got me thinking, in all the years that I have frequented a restaurant for, let's say a six months or more, I have never had an owner, a manager, or a waiter say anything approaching, "I notice that you're in here often and I just wanted to thank you for your business." Or, "I've seen you in here a few times and I just wanted to thank you and introduce myself." Or even, "Oh, you again."

Isn't that weird? Don't you occasionally find ways of saying thank you to your clients? I sure do. But it must be the nature of the places I go, or my demeanor, or some other quirk because as good as "thank you" is for marketing (not to mention that it's just civilized behavior), I've yet to get one.

What's been your experience?

 

About this newsletter

I try to remain as objective as possible about the information I share here. Unless I tell you otherwise, I receive no compensation from the organizations and people mentioned except for occasional product samples. I am an affiliate of Lynda.com and MyFonts.com -- that means, if you purchase something from them, I get a small commission. Comments? Suggestions? Write me at [email protected] -- Chuck Green