Newsletter

February 2015
  
Welcome to the February Newsletter!
Добро пожаловать в бюллетень февраля!
 
  
GREAT NEWS! The Gallery is open again after temporarily closing for the Sundance Film Festival. We even made the
Park City newspaper as we moved back in.
   

  

Margarita Kolobova, "Znamenskey Cathedral"
 23'' x 27'', 2010, Oil on Canvas,
Estimate $3,500- 4,500, Current Bid, $500, C. Willoughby

February Silent Auction 

      

For our February silent auction we are proud to present a beautiful and very Russian work "Znamenskey Cathedral", estimated at $4,000- $5,000, by one of the Gallery's favorite artists Margartia Kolobova
   
Margartia Alexandrovna Kolobova is a young artist on the move! She just graduated from Russia's most prestigious art academy, The Repin Institute in St  Petersburg (founded in 1757), and is now studying at the Fine Arts Facility of Saimaa University in Finland, working on her third art degree.
   
This piece is delightful. Here the cool Russian day with the bright blue sky spars with shadows painted with precision and skill. A singular figure seems unaware of the majesty of a local landmark towering above. This is a stunning painting to start a Russian collection or to add a bright young artist of tomorrow to a collection.

 

 

Sergei Tumakov, "Farm Girl"
36'' x 26'' 1952, Oil on Canvas $5,500

New Works!

 

After temporarily closing for two weeks during the Sundance Film Festival the Gallery is open once again with a complete re-hang and lots of new works! The gallery is full of a variety of never before exhibited works from the Gallery's art vault along with numerous recent acquisitions. The works include landscapes, still lifes, and portraits in all sizes and price ranges by wonderful unknown artists to works by the top masters. One particular new work that we wish to highlight is "Farm Girl" by Sergei Tumakov (1919-2003). A recipient of the title of "Honored Artist of Russia" in 1999.
 


Sergei Tumakov's paintings are represented in art museums in Nizhny Novgorod, Lukh, Ulyanovsk, Moscow, in the Museum of the Academy of Fine Arts (St. Petersburg), St. Petersburg City Museum, and the Fleischer Museum (Phoenix, Arizona), and in the private collections in Paris, London, Germany, the USA and Russia. 

 

 

In addition to this work and many other large paintings we have also added many new and very affordable gems to the treasure chest. These small works along with any of our Russian hand crafted ornaments, nesting dolls, and lacquer boxes make great gifts for yourself or a loved one.

 

View Some of the New Works...

 

Sergei Babkov, "Nurse, Medical Sister"
Russian Stories, Soviet Ideals
 




Opening Reception, Wednesday February 18th, 6-8 p.m.
            
A new exhibition at the Springville Museum of Art invites you to step into Russia during the Soviet era. Russian Stories, Soviet Ideals is a fascinating exploration of the duality of the ideals of the centralized Soviet government and the realities of everyday life for the Soviet people - politically, at work, at home, and on the land. Featuring Soviet artwork from the Museum's with highlights from the Jerald Jacobs collection. 
   
This dynamic exhibition depicts sweeping as well as personal stories that raises such questions as what were the ideals of the Soviet government for the factory, the home, and the farm? How did this affect the life of the women, men, and children in these spaces? How did they assert their own ideas, culture, and family ideals into the one-party, centrally controlled Soviet Union?  

  

Read More....

   


PRIVATE RUSSIAN ART  & CULTURE TOUR
May 11th to 23rd & July

With Dr. Vern Swanson

    

 

There are numerous tours to Russia and many people who can take you there. However, there are very few who know the splendor of Russia like Dr.Vern Swanson, America's preeminent Russian art scholar and the Thomas Kearns McCarthey Gallery. We have been leading small private tours to Russia since 1981. We know Russia--and we know Russian art.

 

It has been a couple of years since our last tour and we are organizing a small private group of Russian art enthusiasts for a behind the scenes view of Russia and its astonishing art. We will visit the imperial Capital of St Petersburg, the power Capital of Moscow and travel to the village Prislonikha, the birth place of Arkady Alexandrovich Plastov. While there we will be hosted by Plastov's grandson, Nikolai Plastov and Dr. Swanson will present a lecture on the life of the great Russian master.

 

This will be an amazing tour in which to not only encounter first-hand the splendor, beauty, art, and history that is Russia but also a rare opportunity to meet people, visit artists' studios, and go places few tourists are invited or even allowed!
 

This will truly be a "once in a lifetime" adventure. We prefer a small group so that the adventure can be more exciting, personal, and educational. Space is very, very limited, there are just a few spots left! If you would like more more information, a complete itinerary, and cost, CLCK HERE or e-mail  

30,000 people visited Moscow's first McDonald's on opening day, 25 years ago.
 
25th Anniversary of the First Moscow McDonald's 
 
Twenty five years ago, on January 30th 1990 the first McDonald's in the Soviet Union opened in Moscow. On opening day 1,000 people were expected but by the end of the day more than 30,000 had arrived for their first taste of American fast food. 
 
The appearance of this notorious symbol of capitalism and the enthusiastic reception it received from the Russian people were signs that times were changing in the Soviet Union. In fact, less than two years later, the Soviet Union ceased to exist as a nation, Mikhail Gorbachev resigned as leader of the country, and various Soviet republics proclaimed their independence. Thanks to some Russian friends who were there, we've have photos from this unforgettable moment in history.
 
Anatoly Dmitriev, "Woman in Purple Sweater" 11'' x 16'', Watercolor on Paper, $300

 

Gallery Stroll, Friday February 27th
 
In addition to a total re-hang of the Gallery, we have also added many new and very affordable gems to the treasure chest. If you haven't visited the Gallery in a while, this month's Gallery Stroll is the perfect time to do so an enjoy a night out in Park City!

The Gallery Stroll takes place the last Friday of every month and is sponsored by the Park City Gallery Association. The stroll takes place from 6 to 9 p.m.
  

Enjoy the newsletter!

   

Stephen Justesen, Gallery Director   


Contact the Gallery...

February Silent Auction!auction
   

Congratulations to R Sheakley who placed the winning bid of $2,750 for January's auction painting, "The Guests have Gone"by one of Russia's most talented up-and-coming artists, Victor Nikolaevich Butko, valued at $4,000- $5,000. 

   

For our February silent auction we are proud to present a beautiful and very Russian work "Znamenskey Cathedral", estimated at $4,000- $5,000, by one of the Gallery's favorite artists Margartia Kolobova
  
Margartia Alexandrovna Kolobova is a young artist on the move! She just graduated from Russia's most prestigious art academy, The Repin Institute in St  Petersburg (founded in 1757), and is now studying at the Fine Arts Facility of Saimaa University in Finland, working on her third art degree.
 
This piece is delightful. The cool Russian day with the bright blue sky. Shadows painted with precision and skill. The singular figure against the majesty of a local landmark. This is a great painting to start a Russian collection or to add a bright young artist of tomorrow to a collection.

Don't miss this wonderful opportunity to add a great work by a up and coming artist!  The current high bid is just $500! The next bid is $750 followed by minimum bidding increments of $250.
 
We invite you to participate in this month's auction and thank everyone who placed bids last month. Please note that you may place a maximum bid and the Gallery will bid on your behalf up to your maximum. By placing a maximum bid you will be assured you are not out bid at the last minute. In the case of identical bids, the Gallery will give precedence to the first one received including including any maximum bids submitted, submit your bid as early as possible. Bids will be taken via telephone, fax, or e-mail until 9:00 pm, Saturday February 28th. Follow all the bidding updates on the Gallery's web site.
 
Margarita Kolobova, "Znamenskey Cathedral"
23'' x 27'', 2010, Oil on Canvas, Estimate $3,500- 4,500, Current Bid, $500, C. Willoughby
Margarita Alexandrovna Kolobova b. 1983

 

 

Margarita Kolobova was born in 1983 in Rostov-on-Don, Russia. From 2000 till 2005 she studied in Rostov-on-Don College of Fine Arts (named after M.B.Grekov) and graduated from it with honours. She worked as a designer and illustrator of "Donskaya Arkheologia" journal and its web-site. She also worked as an artifact illustrator on several archaeological projects. In 2006 Margarita entered St. Petersburg Repin State Academic Institute of Painting Sculpture and Architecture (Academy of Arts) to study painting. Margarita graduated from it in the summer of 2014, again with honours.  She devoted her diploma to Karelian-Finnish epos "Kalevala".

  

In 2013 Margarita did an Internship in Fine Arts at the Saimaa University of Applied Sciences, Finland. "I had a solo exhibition "Mosaics of Kalevala" in Finland, in Kuhmo city. It was organized by Juminkeko Foundation. The foundation itself is devoted to preservation and popularization of Karelian epos "Kalevala". As for me, Kalevala was my favourite book from childhood. When I had to choose a theme for my diploma project, I chose Kalevala. But before settling down to the diploma itself, I worked on this theme. I visited museums of Finland, studied ethnographic materials, old photos of Finnish singers - exponents of Kalevala runes. As a result of this work I had a series of paintings and drawings devoted to Kalevala itself and to the singers of Kalevala runes. These art works were set out in my solo exhibition in Kuhmo. It was my first solo exhibition. It had a good success; there were some benevolent articles in the newspapers and Internet, and some paintings were sold. I was so involved in Finnish epos and culture that I spent autumn, winter and spring 2013/2014 in Finland, in Saimaa University of Applied Sciences, I studied in an internship program in the Fine Arts faculty there". ~ Margarita Kolobova

 

Now Margarita migrates between St. Petersburg, her home town, and Imatra in Finland where she attends the Fine Arts Facility of Saimaa University of Applied Science currently studying sculpture. "I like to study" says Margarita. "I work on plein-air paintings in both countries"

  

Margarita is a follower of a realist trend in art. Her works are exhibited at the State Art Museum in Stary Oskol, Russia; at the Juminkeko Foundation in Finland and in private collections in Russia, the United States and abroad 

 

The Repin Institute/ Russian Academy of Arts, informally known as the St. Petersburg Academy of Arts, was founded in 1757 by Ivan Shuvalov under the name Academy of the Three Noblest Arts. Catherine the Great renamed it the Imperial Academy of Arts and commissioned a new building, completed 25 years later in 1789 by the Neva River. The academy promoted the neoclassical style and technique, and sent its promising students to European capitals for further study. Training at the academy was virtually required for artists to make successful careers.   

 

Formally abolished in 1918 after the Russian Revolution, the academy was renamed several times. It established free tuition; students from across the country competed fiercely for its few places annually. In 1947 the national institution was moved to Moscow, and much of its art collection was moved to the Hermitage. The building in Leningrad was devoted to the Ilya Repin Leningrad Institute for Painting, Sculpture and Architecture, named in honor of one of Russia's foremost realist artists. Since 1991 it has been called the St. Petersburg Institute for Painting, Sculpture and Architecture.


New Workssport

Here is just a small sample of the many new works at the Gallery!
Victor K. Gaiduk, "Summer Landscape" 19'' x 27'', 1970's, Gouache on Board ,$1,100
Victor K. Gaiduk, "Fall Landscape" 15'' x 24'', 1970's, Oil on Board, $1,100
Victor K. Gaiduk, "Spring Landscape" 16'' x 23'', 1970's, Oil on Board, $1,100
Grigory L. Chainikov, "The Morning Sleep", 37'"x 59", 2007, Oil on Canvas, $41,000
Grigory L. Chainikov, "Silent Evening", 15'' x 39'', 2005, Oil on Canvas,  $12,000
Grigory L. Chainikov, "Old Woman in the Boat",  17'' x 24'', 2005, Oil on Canvas,  $10,000
Veniamin A. Safnonov,"Winter Village",  25'' x 33'', 1970's, Oil on Board, $5,900
Veniamim A. Safonov,  "Circle Road",  26'' x 37'', 1962, Oil on Board, $5,900
Vladimir V. Filippov, "Sunny Day" 23'' x 35'', 2011, Oil on Canvas, $5,500
Vladimir V. Filippov, "Spring",  19'' x 23'', 2010, Oil on Canvas, $3,800
Vladimir V. Filippov, "River in the Forest", 19'' x 23'', 2008, Oil on Canvas,  $3,900
25 Years Ago The First McDonalds in the Soviet Union Opens in Moscow macdonalds

 

On January 31, 1990, The Soviet Union's first McDonald's fast food restaurant opened in Moscow. Throngs of people line up to pay the equivalent of several days' wages for Big Macs, shakes, and french fries. As the American newsman reported, the first Russian McDonald's customers "had seen the future, and it works, at least as far as their digestive tract."

 

The opening of McDonald's in Moscow in 1990 was a defining moment in the history of the Soviet Union, coming a year before its collapse. Our friend Sergei Polunin recalls his first-ever visit.

 

One year earlier, there was just a regular Soviet cafe on the place of the future McDonald's.

 

It was the largest McDonald's in the world at the time of the construction and even today remains the largest one in Europe.

 

 
 

"Once inside we were blown away by the number of young cashiers behind the huge counter, smiling, moving like bees, serving one meal after another. Nothing like our fat old ladies in white gowns sitting in front of empty shelves, pyramids of dusty canned food as window dressing. In our excitement, we ordered one of everything, super size, like everyone around us. My mum probably spent our monthly savings on it. I still remember how insanely huge the milkshake looked and I didn't know how to hold a Big Mac with my tiny hands - I was nine years old at the time - so it landed on the ground after the first bite. A tear rolled down my cheek and my mum stormed off for a new burger. "

 

The Grand Opening.
  
"Everything tasted more intense than anything I'd ever tried before. I ate and drank and chewed like it was my last meal on earth. Around ten minutes and 5,000 calories later, my body alerted me to the fact that it wasn't quite able to digest all the fatty deliciousness and that it was probably a good time to check out how an American toilet looked like from the inside. I wasn't alone: the queues to the toilets, especially the women's, was almost as long as the queues outside."
 
Even then President Boris Yeltsin arrived for a taste on opening day.


Everybody wanted to try it, from the janitor to the professor. The lines were long, forming rings around the square like a gargantuan python trying to squeeze the life out of the trees and the fountains within. We didn't know what fast food was. We thought McDonald's was a proper restaurant serving American cuisine; it probably tasted like freedom and we wanted to sample it.



January 31, 1990: The line went for miles.

"The summer came but the lines just kept growing with people from other cities swarming in just for a bite of a hamburger. Finally my mum decided we should give it a try. We stood under the melting sun for around eight hours. That wasn't so much of a problem as we were used to standing in lines for days just to get our monthly ration of sugar and tea. And that without the expectation of any odd-looking yellow clowns to serve us food."





A hamburger cost roughly 1.50 roubles with an average monthly salary of 150 roubles. 

"I still remember how insanely huge the milkshake looked and I didn't know how to hold a Big Mac with my tiny hands."


YES, we will stop for lunch on our visit to Moscow!
Russian Stories, Soviet Idealsspring   
January 21, 2015 - June 1, 2017 




"They are Writing about us in Pravda", Aleskei Vasilev, 1951
Arapov, "Babushka, The Artists Mother"
Springville, UT- Step into the world of Russian life during the Soviet Union era at the Springville Museum of Art's  Russian Stories, Soviet Ideals exhibition, on display now.

 

The idea of a Russian collection catches many of SMA's first time visitors by surprise. However, the Museum has a tradition with Russian art that goes back to 1989 when Dr. Vern Swanson, then Museum director, first traveled to USSR and discovered the beauty, strength and personal insights of the Realist art of Russia. Shortly after the collapse of the Soviet Union, Swanson recognized a unique opportunity and began a program acquiring Russian artwork for the Museum's permanent collection, building one of the largest Russian collections in the United States.     

 

Russian Stories, Soviet Ideals is primarily composed of artwork from the Jerald Jacobs private collection combined with works from the  Museum's permanent collection. What distinguishes this show from the Museum's previous Russian exhibitions is that for the first time there is a focus on how Russians' everyday life was directly affected by a centralized Soviet government. 
 

"We've worked hard to better understand the duality of the Soviet ideals put out by the government and the realities of life for the Russian people," says Jessica Weiss, head of education. "The artwork tells rich personal stories colored by the affect that the government had on the people's everyday lives. It's opened my eyes to the vibrancy of the Russian people and their culture." 

Kozlov, "Russian Mothers Baking Bread"

 The exhibition asks questions such as what were the ideals of the Soviet government for the factory, the home, and the farm? How did this affect the life of the women, men, and children in these spaces? How did they assert their own ideas, culture, and family ideals into the one-party, centrally controlled Soviet Union? 

Babkov, "Portrait of a Student, Kosmya Blaggovich Cheyski"

"We're all very excited about this exhibition," says Weiss, "We're planning a series of events inspired by the exhibition for both adults and children that will explore this dynamic period of history."  

Tutunov, "Fisherman and his Sick Son"

Russian Stories, Soviet Ideals will run through 2017. Free docent-led tours are available of this and all SMA exhibitions. For more information about tours, exhibitions, and museum events please visit smofa.org or call 801-489-2727. The Springville Museum of Art is located at 126 East 400 South, Springville, UT 84663.

 

contact    Thomas Kearns McCarthey Gallery  

444 Main Street, P.O. Box 1695, Park City, UT 84060  

Tel: 435.658.1691  Fax: 435.658.1730  

website: www.McCartheyGallery.net
 
Winter Hours:
Monday - Wednesday 11 am to 7 pm
Thursday - Saturday 11:am to 9 pm 
Sunday 11 am to 6 pm
Open until 9 pm for Gallery Stroll (the last Friday of every month)

  

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