Debby Brown's Hocus Focus
A MONTHLY NEWSLETTER FOR COMMUNICATIONS PROFESSIONALS ON MAXIMIZING THE SUCCESS OF PHOTOGRAPHY SHOOTS WITH TIPS, IDEAS AND PHOTOS.
Hi there!

This month's word is Endurance. It feels appropriate for this time in our world's history. Not to be too pessimistic, but I have a feeling that we are all going to need a lot of endurance, as in perseverance, in order to deal with what's ahead.

As always, the DB&A photographers have their own ways of visualizing the word.

Enjoy,

Debby
Founder
Deborah Brown & Associates
ENDURANCE HAS TWO CONNOTATIONS
If You Concentrate on the Positive...
...It Helps to Get Through the Negative

I like the way the word endurance has both a positive and negative connotation.

Positive as in solidity, or perseverance, or steadfastness. The complete opposite of flighty.

But there's also a tinge of negativity to the word. Endurance suggests that someone or something is going through an ordeal or hardship. Hopefully with a positive result, but not always.

Having endurance is something I aspire to. Back in the days when I was the parent of a toddler, had a thriving business with a few employees and was the owner of a 100-pound dog, the days were very long with very little down time. So I worked hard on keeping myself physically fit by going to the local gym nearly every day. As it turned out, my physical fitness wasn't the only thing that improved. The gym definitely helped with my mental concentration as well. In short, I upped my endurance level.

But my endurance is nothing compared to my photographers'. Location photography has got to be considered an ordeal even if you love what you do.

Take, for example, this one job that Amos Chan shot for a manufacturing client. The job required shooting in two places in China, one in Indonesia and one in Dubai--all back-to-back.

Here's the number of miles Amos covered on that job: 25,121. I'll repeat that in case your endurance is flagging just looking at that number: twenty-five thousand one hundred twenty-one. More than the circumference of the earth at the equator! Good for frequent flyer mileage. Bad for just about everything else.

It's a wonder Amos could even open his eyes by the time he was halfway through the trip. The trick that got him through was scheduling a few down days during the project so that he could close his eyes in a prone position on a bed as opposed to half-sitting on an airplane.

Even with those down days, flying more than 25,000 miles over 14 days and coming back with terrific images to boot, is the epitome of endurance on the job.

We know that budgets and deadlines are tight these days, but if you want your photographer to be fit both physically and mentally, those down days are as important as the days he is shooting.

Have a look at the images my photographers came up with for the word Endurance. Several of them have to do with the physical aspect of it. All are amazing shots.

 
 

Rosanne Olson (based in Seattle)
"I photographed this woman, Bronka Sundstrom, for an energy company. At 78 (and 4'11) she was the oldest person to climb 14,000-foot Mt. Rainier. Her story was amazing: When the prisoners in the concentration camps were liberated after the end of WWII, she was in a coma near death. She was transported to Sweden where she was hospitalized and endured surgeries so she could eat again. She and her husband (who she met at the hospital) moved to Washington where they lived at the entrance to Mt. Rainier. She trained by walking miles each day. When I asked her why, she said 'to forget.'"

 


Ron Wu (based in Chicago)




  Jon Love (based in Sydney, Australia)

 


Bill Gallery (based in New England)



  Neal Wilson (based in the UK)



Amos Chan (based in New York City)






By the way, if you're in the market for stock photography, have a look at Bill Gallery's images here:




Some people find it takes everything they've got to endure the holidays coming up. I hope you're not one of them, but, if you are, here's a tip. Just like the photographers do, schedule in some "down days." It's a wonder what saying, "No" to everything but a quiet night or full weekend day can do.  


Be on the lookout for December's word: HOLIDAYS (if you can endure it)

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DEBORAH BROWN & ASSOCIATES
PHOTOGRAPHY REP
300 East 85th Street
Suite 3203
New York, NY 10028
P 212.772.9335
F 212.772.9487
debby@debbybrown.com
www.debbybrown.com
About Us
Deborah Brown & Associates is an agency providing outstanding photography services to the graphic design and corporate communications communities. For more information, please click here.

2015 DEBORAH BROWN & ASSOCIATES