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In This Issue
From the State Librarian
Open Meeting Law Trustee Update, July 21
Celebrating Poet Galway Kinnell, August 7
Rural Legal Education Project Connects Speakers with Libraries
Gravity Represents VT at National Book Festival
2014 Boston Globe-Horn Book Award Winners Announced
New Books in the Library Science Collection @ the State Library
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Makers' Conference
July 31 - August 2
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topFrom the State Librarian

MarthaReidVTStateLibrarian On July 1, I was one of four Vermonters invited to give testimony on Net Neutrality during a field hearing of the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee at UVM. Senator Patrick Leahy and Congressman Peter Welch were on hand to hear the testimony and question the four witnesses, which included former FCC Commissioner Michael Copps, Vermont Country Store proprietor Cabot Orton and Lisa Groeneveld, owner of Logic Supply (South Burlington). In lieu of my regular column this month, I offer here my complete written testimony: Full article
Open Meeting Law Trustee Update, July 21 
Thinking about the new Open Meeting Law? Join fellow trustees for a webinar on Monday, July 21, from 6:00-7:00 pm. Participants will have the opportunity to ask questions, learn what the amended law requires for minutes, agendas, and announcing meetings, and get credit for trustee training. Check out the 2014 changes online at http://libraries.vermont.gov/libraries/trustees. Full article
Celebrating Poet Galway Kinnell,
August 7

All are invited to a "Celebration of the Life in Poetry of Galway Kinnell" on Thursday, August 7, 2014, 3:00 p.m. at the Vermont Statehouse, 115 State Street in Montpelier. Fellow poets Michael Collier, Mark Doty, Jody Gladding, Edward Hirsch, Marie Howe, Major Jackson, Sharon Olds and Ellen Bryant Voigt will read their favorite Kinnell poems in the House Chamber. A reception with Galway Kinnell and the poets will follow the reading. Free and handicapped accessible. Full article

Rural Legal Education Project
Connects Speakers with Libraries 
painting of lawyers by Daumier Looking for timely informative library programs to help Vermonters with legal challenges? See what the Vermont Bar Association and the Rural Legal Education Project have to offer! Joann Ehrenhouse of the Bennington Chamber of Commerce coordinates a finding service, matching lawyers who speak well with libraries. Dream up the program that works best for the community and contact Ehrenhouse at Monarch7235@gmail.com with the topic and the date. She works with the committee structure of the VBA to find a matching pro bono attorney with the expertise and interest to speak at the library. After the program, libraries are asked to submit a brief report to Joann Ehrenhouse. Full article
Gravity Represents VT at
National Book Festival

gravity cover The 2014 Library of Congress National Book Festival will take place in Washington D.C. on August 30th. Thousands of children will visit the Pavilion of the States to explore literary traditions and books from all over the country. Representing Vermont this year is Gravity, by Burlington author/illustrator Jason Chin (Roaring Brook Press, 2014). Full article 

2014 Boston Globe-Horn Book Award
Winners Announced

One of the most prestigious awards that an author or illustrator of children's books can win is a Boston Globe-Horn Book Award. The winners of this year's awards were announced at BookExpo America. They are:

 

mr tiger book cover PICTURE BOOK WINNER:  

Mr. Tiger Goes Wild written and illustrated by Peter Brown (Little, Brown Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Hachette Book Group)

Bored with city life and the proper behavior it requires, Mr. Tiger has a wild idea that leads him to discover his true nature. Full article


ONLY COMPLETE ARTICLES BEYOND THIS POINT
MARTYFrom the Vermont State Librarian

On July 1, I was one of four Vermonters invited to give testimony on Net Neutrality during a field hearing of the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee at UVM. Senator Patrick Leahy and Congressman Peter Welch were on hand to hear the testimony and question the four witnesses, which included former FCC Commissioner Michael Copps, Vermont Country Store proprietor Cabot Orton and Lisa Groeneveld, owner of Logic Supply (South Burlington). In lieu of my regular column this month, I offer here my complete written testimony:

 

Senator Leahy and members of the Senate Committee on the Judiciary,

 

Thank you for your invitation to testify today on behalf of libraries and an Open Internet. I am joined today in this room by members of the Vermont library community from academic, school and public libraries. We are united in our belief that an open and innovative Internet is essential to our nation's freedom of speech, educational achievement, economic vitality, and equal access to information. An Open Internet is fundamental for libraries to fulfill their mission to provide students, government employees, teachers and faculty and the general public -- citizens of all ages and backgrounds -- equal access to information and to the wide variety of digital resources and opportunities made available via the Internet.

 

It has always been and remains today a core value of libraries to preserve the free flow of information. It doesn't matter whether that information comes in print or audio-visual or digital format. Intellectual Freedom -- the right of citizens to have access to information, including that which may be controversial, is a hallmark of our democracy and of libraries. In my 30 years of work in public libraries, I have seen firsthand why no-fee access to information -- including a wide range of viewpoints and opinions -- is so critical to an informed and engaged citizenry. The Internet is a significant part of today's library of knowledge and opinion, and whether the information needed at any particular moment by any particular individual is about jobs, schoolwork, entrepreneurship, healthcare, personal finance, e-commerce or the agenda for next week's local school board meeting -- it's all vital to the end user. Currently, this information -- as well as the opportunity for citizens to create and distribute their own content -- is open and freely accessible on the Internet. And it needs to stay that way.

 

Today's technologies permit libraries -- and individuals -- to create and disseminate their own information. We are not just providers and consumers of information, but creators as well. Libraries collect, organize and make available unique combinations of online resources for our users: local history, resources for job-seekers, consumer information, subject-area research tools and homework help for students. And we know that users also benefit from being able to create their own information, use their own voices -- and to be seen and heard on the Internet. This is another aspect of the Internet necessitating Net Neutrality so that all voices can be heard, that the First Amendment can apply to the Internet and that the great capacities and benefits of the Internet can be realized by all -- not just those who are able to pay.

 

The Internet provides all of us with a platform for the open exchange of information and ideas, intellectual discourse, civic engagement, research, innovation, teaching and learning. Access to the Internet has revolutionized libraries and the services that we provide to our users. This is true for libraries of all types, but in this testimony I want to focus on how the Internet is used in our public libraries -- and why the Internet functions best when it is open to everyone on an equal basis, without interference or restriction by Internet providers.

 

Vermont is a small state with a population of just under 631,000. We have 183 public libraries, more libraries per capita than any other state. Only 17% of these libraries serve populations greater than 5,000, and only two libraries serve populations greater than 20,000. We are a state of small, rural communities and our public libraries -- like libraries across the country -- are often the only place in town for free Internet access. Public libraries are the "go-to" places for job-seekers, independent learners, researchers and local entrepreneurs. Nearly all public libraries in this country offer free public computers with Internet access and public Wi-Fi. How else are local residents who have no computer or Internet access at home going to locate job openings -- or file the online job applications that are now required by so many employers? How will they be able to access e-government services? Last year Vermont libraries reported 3.6 million visits and 4.5 million items checked out. But this does not fully reflect the increasing demand for library technology -- both inside the library building and remotely from home, school and office via the Internet. In addition to computers and Internet access, libraries offer e-books and other e-resources for free download to laptops, mobile tablets and smartphones.

 

In Vermont, citizens can use their personal public library card to log on from any computer device to the statewide Vermont Online Library, a collection of licensed subscription-based resources, including thousands of full-text articles from magazines and newspapers, car repair videos, reliable health and medical information, interactive language learning, tools for creating resumes and business plans and rich content on science and current affairs. In addition, the Department of Libraries provides every Vermonter no-fee access -- via their library card barcode -- to over 500 online classes in a program called Universal Class: self-paced learning with live remote instructors on topics that range from digital photography and knitting to astronomy, bookkeeping and business writing. Our libraries provide the access -- leveling the playing field for citizens and entrepreneurs who need these learning and training opportunities. Recently I was approached by the custodian in a small library who thanked me for providing this service in his town -- he had used his home computer to complete five different history classes, his personal interest and passion.

 

In Vermont, 53 public libraries have high speed, high-capacity fiber broadband, thanks to a federal BTOP grant. In Reading* (population 688), a local entrepreneur who operates a home-based business has started doing his work at the public library because the fiber connection is so fast and efficient. National studies show that citizens often choose to use public library Internet and Wi-Fi -- even if they have it at home. Why? It may be because the connection is faster, but people also like the library environment, the connection with their local community, easy access to other library resources, and the assistance of a trained librarian, when needed.

         *My original text mistakenly identified this library as the Readsboro Library.

 

In Arlington (Vermont), the public library serves a population of about 3,800 with a new high-speed fiber connection. They have used laptops and a scanner to put their local history online, including a collection of wonderful historic photographs of surrounding towns. Arlington is also one of 14 Vermont public libraries that last year launched free community videoconferencing. Using high-quality microphones, cameras and large screen monitors, these libraries have hosted no-fee online long-distance interactive business seminars, long-distance job-interviews for individuals and online meetings and trainings -- sometimes with viewers tuning in from multiple library sites. This is all web-based so unimpeded Internet access is critical.

 

Library patrons use the Internet to stream audio and video and to Skype distant family and friends. They also upload content -- and that reflects the evolving role of libraries as places for content creation. Local authors, innovators and entrepreneurs use the public library Internet to upload and share their unique content with the rest of the world. This promotes collaboration in learning, in research and in business development. In addition to purchasing licensed subscription resources for their users, libraries are creating their own content for the Internet. Public libraries are following the lead of our school and academic libraries which create MOOCs and other online instructional resources and post student projects and interactive learning via the Internet, and we are seeing development of unique online content in even our smallest public libraries.

 

Internet resources must be both affordable for libraries and freely accessible to those we serve. Without the Open Internet there is a danger that libraries will face higher service charges for so-called "premium" online information services. This could result in fast access to for-profit higher education or other commercial educational entities over local community colleges, or quick results leading to Disney services to children over access to quality children's literature. This would clearly place limitations on the amount or quality of information libraries can provide to their users.There simply cannot be a system of tiered Internet access in this country that would set limits on bandwidth or speed because of paid prioritized transmission. Such a scheme would only increase the gap that already exists between the "haves" and the "have nots" and would create friction and, in some cases, insurmountable obstacles for citizens to get the information they need. Bowing to powerful corporate interests that would take control of the Internet pipes would put libraries and the millions of citizens they serve at risk. Imagine the consequences: libraries would be forced to just turn off access to vital information for those who need it most. We cannot afford a society where information is available to only those who have deep pockets.

 

I have spent my entire professional life working in libraries to ensure that information resources are freely available to all citizens on an equal basis. All Americans -- including the most disenfranchised citizens, those who would have no way to access the Internet without the library -- the unemployed and underemployed, those who are in need of good health information or e-government services, New Americans struggling to adapt to their new country, those who cannot afford home Internet service or who lack the skills to use computers, and those who may want to create and share their own information -- need to be able to use Internet resources on an equal footing.

 

Americans depend on ready and equal access to all that the Internet -- the amazing and mind-boggling range of Internet content and resources -- offers to them to live their daily lives, to improve their education and job skills, to find employment and to contribute to the local economy. An Internet that is anything but open and providing equal access for every citizen is simply not an option. An Open Internet is not a privilege for the affluent; it is a right for every one of us. The bottom line is this: we need legally enforceable rules that will protect the Open Internet. We cannot simply "trust" that Internet Service Providers will do the right thing.

 

Senators, you have an opportunity to do the right thing for America. You have a choice -- to advance the work of our libraries and other learning institutions and to protect citizen access to the Internet -- or to take that right away and to give these opportunities only to those citizens or entities which can pay. As a representative of the State of Vermont who works with libraries statewide and with other state librarians across the country, and as an American citizen, I expect you to make the decision that is best for all of us and which strengthens our country. Please champion Net Neutrality and do all you can to support an Open Internet. Americans everywhere will thank you for your vision and your steadfast defense of our most cherished freedoms.

 

I want to thank you, Senator Leahy, for your leadership on this issue and for scheduling today's hearing. Your introduction, with Congresswoman Matsui, of the "Online Competition and Consumer Choice Act of 2014" takes us in the right direction and I applaud you for your strong stance for an Open Internet. Thank you.

 

Marty Reid

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trusteeOpen Meeting Law Trustee Update, July 21 

Thinking about the new Open Meeting Law? Join fellow trustees for a webinar on Monday, July 21, from 6:00-7:00 pm. Participants will have the opportunity to ask questions, learn what the amended law requires for minutes, agendas, and announcing meetings, and get credit for trustee training. Check out the 2014 changes online at http://libraries.vermont.gov/libraries/trustees

 

Register and reserve a seat at https://www4.gotomeeting.com/register/151321927. After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

 

System Requirements

 

PC-based attendees

Required: Windows®8, 7, Vista, XP or 2003 Server

 

Mac®-based attendees

Required: Mac OS®X 10.6 or newer

 

Mobile attendees

Required: iPhone®, iPad®, Android™ phone or Android tablet

 

More about the Open Meeting Law is available at http://libraries.vermont.gov/libraries/trustees, including a pdf of the new law, a summary, and resources from the Secretary of State's office and the Vermont League of Cities and Towns. For further information, contact Amy Howlett: amy.howlett@state.vt.us or (802)463-0142.

 

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galwayCelebrating Poet Galway Kinnell, August 7 

All are invited to a "Celebration of the Life in Poetry of Galway Kinnell" on Thursday, August 7, 2014, 3:00 p.m. at the Vermont Statehouse, 115 State Street in Montpelier. Fellow poets Michael Collier, Mark Doty, Jody Gladding, Edward Hirsch, Marie Howe, Major Jackson, Sharon Olds and Ellen Bryant Voigt will read their favorite Kinnell poems in the House Chamber. A reception with Galway Kinnell and the poets will follow the reading. Free and handicapped accessible.

 

Presented by Back Roads Reading and co-sponsored by the Department of Libraries, the Vermont Council for the Humanites, the Vermont Arts Council and Vermont Public Radio.

 

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ruralRural Legal Education Project Connects Speakers with Libraries 

Looking for timely informative library programs to help Vermonters with legal challenges? See what the Vermont Bar Association and the Rural Legal Education Project have to offer! Joann Ehrenhouse of the Bennington Chamber of Commerce coordinates a finding service, matching lawyers who speak well with libraries. Dream up the program that works best for the community and contact Ehrenhouse at Monarch7235@gmail.com with the topic and the date. She works with the committee structure of the VBA to find a matching pro bono attorney with the expertise and interest to speak at the library. After the program, libraries are asked to submit a brief report to Joann Ehrenhouse.

 

Possible topics that might interest Vermonters include family law, forming a business entity, elder law, wills and estates, real estate and property issues. Attorneys will not discuss specifics of anyone's personal case, although they will be available for follow-up. The recommended structure is a 45-minute presentation on the area of the law followed by a 45-minute question and answer period.

 

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gravityGravity Represents VT at National Book Festival 
The 2014 Library of Congress National Book Festival will take place in Washington D.C. on August 30th. Thousands of children will visit the Pavilion of the States to explore literary traditions and books from all over the country. Representing Vermont this year is Gravity, by Burlington author/illustrator Jason Chin (Roaring Brook Press, 2014).

Through bright paintings and bold text, Chin's book introduces key concepts of gravity, cleverly pairing factual information with an illustrated story about objects floating into space and falling back to Earth. While the book is not specifically Vermont-related (though a
Burlington Free Press article about Chin mentions that some of the falling objects land at his nieces' lemonade stand in Middlebury), this is a great opportunity to showcase the work of a talented local author. Posters featuring the winners of Vermont's three students' choice book awards will also be on display at the festival. To learn more about Jason Chin's books, visit http://jasonchin.net/books/.

 

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awards2014 Boston Globe-Horn Book Award Winners Announced 

One of the most prestigious awards that an author or illustrator of children's books can win is a Boston Globe-Horn Book Award. The winners of this year's awards were announced at BookExpo America. They are:

 

mr tiger book cover PICTURE BOOK WINNER: 

Mr. Tiger Goes Wild written and illustrated by Peter Brown (Little, Brown Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Hachette Book Group)

Bored with city life and the proper behavior it requires, Mr. Tiger has a wild idea that leads him to discover his true nature.

 

 
grasshopper jungle cover FICTION WINNER:
Grasshopper Jungle
by Andrew Smith (Dutton Children's Books, an imprint of Penguin Group USA) Austin Szerba narrates the end of humanity as he and his best friend Robby accidentally unleash an army of giant, unstoppable bugs and uncover the secrets of a decades-old experiment gone terribly wrong.

 




port chicago 50 cover NONFICTION WINNER:
The Port Chicago 50: Disaster, Mutiny, and the Fight for Civil Rights
by Steve Sheinkin (Roaring Book Press)
Presents an account of the 1944 civil rights protest involving hundreds of African-American Navy servicemen who were unjustly charged with mutiny for refusing to work in unsafe conditions after the deadly Port Chicago explosion.

 

PICTURE BOOK HONOR WINNERS:

Rules of Summer written and illustrated by Shaun Tan (Arthur A. Levine Books, an imprint of Scholastic)

Knock Knock: My Dad's Dream for Me written by Daniel Beaty and illustrated by Bryan Collier (Little, Brown Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Hachette Book Group)

 

FICTION HONOR WINNERS:

Rose Under Fire by Elizabeth Wein (Hyperion, an imprint of Disney Book Group)

Boxers & Saints by Gene Luen Yang (First Second Books, an imprint of Roaring Brook Press)

 

NONFICTION HONOR WINNERS:
The Animal Book: A Collection of the Fastest, Fiercest, Toughest, Cleverest, Shyest-and Most Surprising-Animals on Earth
by Steve Jenkins (Houghton Mifflin Books for Children)

Josephine: The Dazzling Life of Josephine Baker written by Patricia Hruby Powell and illustrated by Christian Robinson (Chronicle Books)

 

Visit the Horn Book website for reviews of these titles and more information about the award.

 

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libsciNew in the Library Science Collection at the Vermont State Library 

These titles may be borrowed from the Vermont State Library.

 

Best American Infographics. Mariner Books, 2013.

 

Buchanan, Heidi E. The One-Shot Library Instruction Survival Guide. ALA Editions, 2014.

 

Campbell, James W. P. The Library: a World History. University of Chicago Press, 2013.

 

Conner, Matthew. The New University Library: Four Case Studies. ALA Editions, 2014.

 

Goodman, Amanda L. The Comparative Guide to WordPress in Libraries. ALA Editions, 2014.

 

Guide to Reference in Medicine and Health. ALA Editions, 2014.

 

Hatry, Harry P. Performance Measurement: Getting Results. Urban Institute Press, c2006.

 

Introduction to Reference Sources in the Health Sciences. ALA Neal-Schuman, 2014.

 

Johnson, Peggy. Fundamentals of Collection Development and Management. ALA Editions, 2014.

 

Materials Review, Spring 2014 [videorecording]. Prepared and presented by the Vermont Department of Libraries. RETN Media Center, 2014.

 

Moniz, Richard J. Fundamentals for the Academic Liaison. Neal-Schuman, 2014.

 

Reidsma, Matthew. Responsive Web Design for Libraries. ALA TechSource, 2014.

 

Sears List of Subject Headings. Grey House Publishing, 2014.

 

Varnum, Kenneth J. The Top Technologies Every Librarian Needs to Know. American Library Association, 2014.

 

Ye, Yunshan. The ALA Guide to Researching Modern China. ALA Editions, 2014.

 

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