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In This Issue
From the State Librarian
Catamount Library Network Chooses Koha
Vermont Libraries See Stars
Vermont Librarians Attend ARSL Conference
World Book Night
VPLF Grants for Youth Services
Teen Tech Week
Watch ALA Book Awards
Vermont Library Trustees and Friends
Top 10 Tools to Use in Vermont Online Library
GreenFILE, Teacher Databases Have Free Access
Asking for Money Outside Vermont
Department Staff News
New Books in the Library Science Collection @ the State Library
Learn more
Helpful Links
Department of Libraries

VT Library Association
VT School Library Assoc
 
VCAL GMLC

VT Folklife Center 
Join Our Mailing List

topFrom the State Librarian

MartaReidVTStateLibrarian

One thing I have learned from my 35 years as a librarian is that nothing stays the same for long. In my career I have moved from catalog cards and mimeograph machines to ebooks and cloud computing and I am proud to be in a profession that continually embraces new technology and service models to meet the changing needs of our constituents. My learning curve as State Librarian has been especially steep, and four years into this job I now have a better understanding of how my vision for library service in Vermont fits into the workings of State government. But I am also acutely aware of the many challenges (anyone notice a change in the economy since 2008?) and difficult decisions (say, closing the Northeast Regional Library) that come with the job. Amidst all the change I try to stay curious, open and flexible, listen and read, and move through the world with a bit of "beginner's mind." Read more 

Catamount Library Network Chooses Koha

At its November meeting, the Board of the Catamount Library Network made the decision to move forward with Koha software for its open-source integrated library system. This is a reversal of the decision the Catamount Board made in 2011 to develop their shared system using the Evergreen open source platform. This latest decision comes after an intensive review of both the Koha and Evergreen systems which included assistance from Lori Ayre, a consultant with the Galecia Group, discussions with Evergreen and Koha open source vendors, conversations with leaders in open-source library consortia across the country, and with members of Vermont's VOKAL Koha project. Read more 

Vermont Libraries See Stars   

In November, Library Journal announced the fifth crop of "America's Star Libraries." It is thrilling to see three Vermont libraries in the list which excel in delivering services to the community. Ray Lyons and Keith Curry Lance explain the methodology in the article (https://bitly.com/RpAorB).

Read more  

Vermont Librarians Attend ARSL Conference
ARSL 2012 attendees

ARSL, the Association for Rural and Small Libraries, was formed to help those who work in rural and small libraries connect with each other, share good ideas, and better serve our communities. It does this through listservs, online workshops, and, most importantly, through the annual conference that brings together hundreds of librarians from all over the country who work in small, rural libraries just like Vermont's. This year, for the first time, the Vermont Department of Libraries sponsored scholarships for two Vermont librarians and one LIBstaff member to attend the conference. The lucky recipients were Margaret Woodruff of Charlotte, Sarah Costa of Washington, and Michael Roche, the Northeast Regional Consultant. They hope that in sharing their experiences with the rest of Vermont's librarians, others will also be able to learn from this invaluable conference. Read more 

World Book Night: Celebrate and Share the Love of Reading
World Book Night is an annual celebration dedicated to spreading the love of reading. Each year on April 23, tens of thousands of people go out into their communities and give a total of half a million free paperbacks away.  Begun in the UK in 2011, World Book Night spread to the US in 2012, and was tremendously successful. People gave away books at nursing homes, homeless shelters, prisons, medical offices, on the street, anywhere they might find people who are non-or light readers. Read more

VPLF Grants for Youth Services in Public Libraries

The Vermont Public Library Foundation (VPLF) will sponsor another round of Winnie Belle Learned grants in 2013. Grants will be awarded to Vermont public libraries on a competitive basis to support services to youth. Libraries are encouraged to apply for funding for children's and young adult services, including collection development projects, programming and other services to youth and their families. Applications for these Winnie Belle Learned grants will be due on February 15, 2013, and awards will be announced by late March. This grant program is made possible by the generous financial support of Dr. Burnett Rawson of Essex Junction, who set up this special fund in honor of his benefactress, Winnie Belle Learned, a Vermont educator. The Fund's goal is to help public libraries in Vermont foster literacy, love of learning, critical analysis, and intellectual exploration among children and teens in their communities. For complete guidelines and for the application form, see: http://libraries.vermont.gov/libraries/vplf . Applicants may apply for any amount up to $2,500.

Teen Tech Week™, March 10-16, 2013

The theme of the next Teen Tech Week™ (March 10 - 16, 2013), sponsored by the American Library Association, is Check In @ your library! This year's theme encourages libraries to showcase the technology they offer, from services and digital literacy-focused programs to resources like e-books, films, music, audio books, databases and more. Although most teens go online every day, many are unaware of all the resources the library offers, or how librarians can help them with research or using the resources ethically. For program ideas, more information and to sign up to participate, please see, www.ala.org/teentechweek.

Watch the ALA Book Awards Announcements 

Children's book people anxiously await the Big Announcements every year, the time when the winners of the Caldecott, Newbery, Prinz and many other book awards are announced. The announcements always take place during the Midwinter Conference of the American Library Association, and this year they will happen on Monday, January 28, 2013. Anyone can watch the announcements live starting at 10:45 a.m. at www.ala.org/yma.

Vermont Library Trustees and Friends 

A group of dedicated library trustees came together Saturday November 3rd for the annual conference of the Vermont Library Association's Trustee section (VLTA). They were joined this year by library directors and members of "Friends of the Library" from all over the state.

 

Sally Gardner Reed, Executive Director of United for Libraries provided a lively and engaging Keynote. United for Libraries is a division of the American Library Association (ALA), and is the Association of Library Trustees, Advocates, Friends and Foundations. Sally talked about the changes in public libraries, such as e-books, Maker Spaces, libraries as community and learning centers, and the vital need for effective library advocacy. Read more  
Top 10 Tools to Use in Vermont Online Library  
  1. SEARCH ALERTS/RSS FEEDS - Make the resources work for you. Search Alerts/RSS Feeds will alert you when new articles are available for your topic. Look for the Create Search Alert link on search result pages or Create Journal Alert link on Publication Detail pages and follow the directions to set up as many as you like. Read more
GreenFILE, Teacher Databases Have Free Access
In the last newsletter, it was mentioned that database producer EBSCO offers free access to LISTA: Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts. EBSCO also offers two other databases at no charge. One is Teacher Reference Center, which indexes 280 periodicals, 95% of which are peer reviewed. This database is not full-text, but does have abstracts. Also available free of charge is GreenFILE, which indexes and abstracts more than half a million records "covering all aspects of human impact to the environment." This multi-disciplinary database indexes a combination of scholarly, government, and general-interest titles. Full text is available for nearly 6,000 articles, the rest have abstracts. To get to LISTA, Teacher Reference Center, or GreenFILE, go to www.libraryresearch.com.

Asking for Money Outside VT

Fundraising is one of the most important duties of every library board member. Often, Friends groups assist in this duty. Activities may include local events such as book sales, contests, or dinners, but some of this fundraising will entail direct appeals to donors, perhaps in the form of an annual or capital appeal letter. These are usually sent to a wide group of potential donors, some of whom may be second homeowners or seasonal visitors who reside outside Vermont. These communications, sent to out-of-state residents, have the potential to run afoul of those foreign jurisdictions' charitable solicitation laws. Thus, boards and Friends groups should be mindful of this issue.

Department Staff News

Renee Ancel, Executive Assistant to the State Librarian, leaves her post this month after three years of employment with the Department of Libraries. Librarians across the state know Renee for her upbeat attitude and her helpful assistance concerning grants, Vermont Online Library memberships, and much more. Renee has also been responsible for the design and publication of this monthly newsletter. Renee is leaving state government so she can spend more time with her two young sons and to help with her husband's business. Good luck, Renee. We will miss you!

 

Congratulations to Jeremiah Kellogg, Library Consultant at the Midstate Library Service Center, and his wife Krisandra. They are the proud parents of Giovanni Abhainn Kellogg, born on November 21. Mother and baby (and Dad!) are doing well - and Giovanni's older siblings are adjusting well to this newest family member.


ONLY COMPLETE ARTICLES BEYOND THIS POINT

MARTYFrom the Vermont State Librarian

One thing I have learned from my 35 years as a librarian is that nothing stays the same for long. In my career I have moved from catalog cards and mimeograph machines to ebooks and cloud computing and I am proud to be in a profession that continually embraces new technology and service models to meet the changing needs of our constituents. My learning curve as State Librarian has been especially steep, and four years into this job I now have a better understanding of how my vision for library service in Vermont fits into the workings of State government. But I am also acutely aware of the many challenges (anyone notice a change in the economy since 2008?) and difficult decisions (say, closing the Northeast Regional Library) that come with the job. Amidst all the change I try to stay curious, open and flexible, listen and read, and move through the world with a bit of "beginner's mind."

 

It was just that kind of open-mindedness that I had to summon for myself last month when I asked the five member libraries of the Catamount Library Network to take a second look at our decision to build a shared integrated library system (ILS) using the open-source Evergreen platform. With a growing number of libraries in Vermont moving to the Koha open-source platform, shouldn't we pause and re-consider our earlier decision? Never mind that we had sought the counsel of an expert consultant or that we had listened carefully to the advice of satisfied Evergreen libraries from across the country. We owed it to ourselves - and to the rest of the Vermont library community - to take another look.

 

As you will see in the article below ("Catamount Library Network Chooses Koha") that's just what the Catamount libraries did. They took a step back and gave Koha another good look. They asked good questions and did another careful comparison of the features of both software platforms. My hat is off to the Catamount members, because the process was painful. It's never easy turning away from a hard-earned decision and changing directions, but they did it! And in the end the decision to choose Koha was unanimous. So here's the good news: the Catamount Library Network will be a Koha consortium, and in 2013 those five libraries will migrate to the Koha system. That means that in Vermont we will have two Koha library consortia - VOKAL (under the leadership of the Green Mountain Library Consortium) and Catamount. But I know that won't be the end of the story. We have lots of Koha expertise in Vermont - and others share my vision for a single statewide shared library catalog and I value their ideas and their input on this issue. Getting there will probably not be easy. Whatever path we take will have its share of difficult decisions and (at times) wrenching change. That's a given. But I am grateful to my fellow librarians who are also curious and flexible and ready to embrace change. 2013 is just around the corner. I, for one, am eager to see what challenges the New Year will have in store for us. Koha will be a big part of our 2013 mix at the Department of Libraries - and I say, bring it on!

 

Happy Holidays - and best wishes for a very Happy New Year!

 

Marty 

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catamountCatamount Library Network Chooses Koha

At its November meeting, the Board of the Catamount Library Network made the decision to move forward with Koha software for its open-source integrated library system. This is a reversal of the decision the Catamount Board made in 2011 to develop their shared system using the Evergreen open source platform. This latest decision comes after an intensive review of both the Koha and Evergreen systems which included assistance from Lori Ayre, a consultant with the Galecia Group, discussions with Evergreen and Koha open source vendors, conversations with leaders in open-source library consortia across the country, and with members of Vermont's VOKAL Koha project.

 

The Catamount Board's decision was made in response to the notable success and growth of the VOKAL Koha consortium, which is a project of the Green Mountain Library Consortium. It is the vision of the Department of Libraries to have a shared statewide library catalog, and because dozens of Vermont libraries have already selected Koha through the VOKAL project, the timing was right for Catamount to make the software switch. The decision was made before any contracts were signed with vendors related to the Evergreen software platform.

 

The Catamount Library Network began as a pilot project under the leadership of the Department of Libraries and was established as a membership library consortium. Phase One of the project,the pilot phase, includes five libraries, with partial funding from the Department of Libraries. The Department has used this pilot project to do an in-depth examination of consortial integrated library systems in other states and to conduct an analysis of available open-source software platforms. The five pilot project libraries are Brooks Memorial Library (Brattleboro), Rutland Free Library, Springfield Town Library, Waterbury Public Library and Fletcher Memorial Library (Ludlow). State Librarian Martha Reid views the Board's decision to select Koha as a turning point in the future development of a statewide shared library catalog in Vermont and is encouraged by the opportunities this change offers for statewide dialog and resource sharing. The Catamount libraries plan to migrate to the Koha system during 2013.

 

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Vermont Libraries See Stars fivestar2

In November, Library Journal announced the fifth crop of "America's Star Libraries." It is thrilling to see three Vermont libraries in the list which excel in delivering services to the community. Ray Lyons and Keith Curry Lance explain the methodology in the article (https://bitly.com/RpAorB).

 

The rating system uses annually-reported public library statistics on circulation, visits, program attendance and public internet computer users to score libraries. In each of five expenditure ranges, libraries' numbers are compared to the average numbers for each statistic. The libraries that are the highest above the average earn five, four, and three star ratings.

 

Who are the big performers in Vermont? The 2012 Star Libraries are the Five Star Sherburne Memorial Library in Killington (score: 2859) and Craftsbury Public Library (2381); and the Four Star Pawlet Public Library (1453). Vermont libraries are somewhat under-reported in these compilations, because so many of them have service populations under 1,000. Statistically, this group of libraries varies so widely they have never been included.

 

The Department of Libraries thanks all Vermont libraries that have contributed their statistical data every fall. Without this data, standard measurement of library performance is impossible. The statistics that Vermont librarians provide are valuable on many levels, for advocacy, for determining local trends, and for comparisons to similar libraries. Library development consultants are available for advice in using annual statistics (online at http://libraries.vermont.gov/libraries/stats) to analyze library patterns.

 

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ARSLVermont Librarians Attend ARSL Conference

ARSL, the Association for Rural and Small Libraries, was formed to help those who work in rural and small libraries connect with each other, share good ideas, and better serve our communities. It does this through listservs, online workshops, and, most importantly, through the annual conference that brings together hundreds of librarians from all over the country who work in small, rural libraries just like Vermont's. This year, for the first time, the Vermont Department of Libraries sponsored scholarships for two Vermont librarians and one LIBstaff member to attend the conference. The lucky recipients were Margaret Woodruff of Charlotte, Sarah Costa of Washington, and Michael Roche, the Northeast Regional Consultant. They hope that in sharing their experiences with the rest of Vermont's librarians, others will also be able to learn from this invaluable conference.

 

One defining characteristic of this conference was its overwhelming applicability. Unlike at some bigger conferences, every single session here was targeted toward libraries just like ours facing similar challenges and with similar resources to solve them. The workshops and lunchtime conversations covered the topics that always come up when two or more Vermont librarians get together - dealing with changing technology, putting on great programs with limited funding, advocating effectively in a rural setting, what on earth we should do about e-books - but here, we were able to learn how libraries with radically different communities and funding and governance structures addressed these issues. We were able to hear first-hand from librarians in Colorado who joined together to purchase and host actual e-content directly from authors and publishers, and we also heard from librarians on the other end of the spectrum who were trying to create a consortium much like the Green Mountain Library Consortium, but who have found that vendors are no longer as open to new library collectives.

 

Margaret's favorite three sessions represented the overall "takeaway" from the conference: Cataloging & Classification, which stressed focus on the patron; Going Google, because it showed incorporating technology in an unintimidating way for staff; and Mentoring as a Subversive Activity, because it emphasized how to bring the library to the world outside. Sarah particularly appreciated sessions on advocacy which showcased an astonishing range of tactics, resources, and ideas, and sessions on e-readers and e-books, which showed more diversity than she ever expected in resources, vendors, pricing, ownership models, and more.

 

Most valuable for all was the opportunity to "dig in" to the library world for an immersive full three days, to sit down at a meal with fellow attendees and engage in lively discussion about e-readers, story times, book displays...not one's normal dinner-time conversation! Participants and presenters alike shared a genuine camaraderie. Margaret stopped at the ARSL registration table to ask a question and ended up in a conversation about early literacy with ARSL President Andrea Berstler. Similarly, a quick stop at the Web Junction vendor table resulted in a refresher course in "Geek Your Library" with Jennifer Peterson, and a query about the IMLS grants led to a chat with Donald Delauter about using the library for community communications, a direct link to a town-wide project in Charlotte. Following her informative and entertaining presentation on Cataloging, Melissa Powell generously offered to share details of the "bibliographic integrity" work she is involved with in Colorado, and this has segued into an informal consultation about cataloging in a shared system, such as VOKAL.  

 

Of course, some of the most meaningful contacts we made were with each other. We appreciated the chance to bounce ideas and share the details of our conference experiences with one another. We all agree that the connection between the Department of Libraries and ARSL should be fostered and supported as much as possible. The more people who can learn and share with others, the better for all. Besides attendance by Vermont librarians at the ARSL annual conference, it would be a great benefit to encourage communication across the library landscape in Vermont through a "satellite" ARSL group here.

 

Membership in ARSL is quite reasonable: it starts at just $9 a year, and we would highly recommend it to librarians across Vermont. Membership gives you access to ARSL's trove of information for all things rural librarianship and allows you to join the conversation on the listserv, where relevant, informative exchanges happen daily and where you have immediate access to a diverse, experienced knowledge base. If there is one thing this conference showed us, it is that none of us librarians are in this alone, and we are all stronger together.

 

Margaret, Sarah, and Michael are happy to share further if anyone has specific questions about the conference or lessons learned there. Feel free to contact them at margaret.charlottelibraryvt@gmail.com for Margaret, washington@vals.state.vt.us for Sarah, and Michael.Roche@state.vt.us for Michael.


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 worldWorld Book Night: Celebrate and Share the Love of Reading

World Book Night is an annual celebration dedicated to spreading the love of reading. Each year on April 23, tens of thousands of people go out into their communities and give a total of half a million free paperbacks away.  Begun in the UK in 2011, World Book Night spread to the US in 2012, and was tremendously successful. People gave away books at nursing homes, homeless shelters, prisons, medical offices, on the street, anywhere they might find people who are non-or light readers.

 

Each year a panel of librarians and booksellers chooses thirty titles to give away. The authors of the books waive their royalties and the publishers agree to pay to produce the specially-printed World Book Night U.S. editions. The titles for 2013 were recently announced, and include such classics as My Antonia (Willa Cather) and Fahrenheit 451 (Ray Bradbury), as well as much newer titles such as City of Thieves by David Benioff and Tina Fey's Bossypants. There are titles for children and teens, too, including The Phantom Tollbooth (Norton Juster) The Lightning Thief (Rick Riordan) and Looking for Alaska (John Green).

 

Anyone who is interested can apply to hand out 20 copies of a particular title in their community. Givers are chosen based on their ability to reach light and non-readers. For more information or to sign up, please see: http://www.us.worldbooknight.org


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VTLAVermont Library Trustees and Friends

A group of dedicated library trustees came together Saturday, November 3rd, for the annual conference of the Vermont Library Association's Trustee section (VLTA). They were joined this year by library directors and members of "Friends of the Library" from all over the state.

 

Sally Gardner Reed, Executive Director of United for Libraries, provided a lively and engaging keynote. United for Libraries is a division of the American Library Association (ALA), also known as the Association of Library Trustees, Advocates, Friends and Foundations. Sally talked about the changes in public libraries, such as e-books, Maker Spaces, libraries as community and learning centers, and the vital need for effective library advocacy.

 

Workshops throughout the day focused on best practices in the core areas of financial management and open meeting law and its evolving issues in terms of 21st century technologies. Tanya Morehouse, Chief Auditor for the State of Vermont and library trustee, was joined by Joe Juhasz, Deputy State Auditor, to provide insights into audits - when they are needed and how to prepare for them. Abigail Friedman of the Vermont League of Cities and Towns spoke on Open Meeting Law as it pertains to library boards. Additional workshops included advocacy, effective relations between Friends and Trustees and an update on the current Vermont libraries Personnel Salary and Benefits Report Update. And of course, the VLTA version of "Wait, Wait" provided an amusing and educational break after lunch.

 

This annual conference is one of several continuing education opportunities for trustees and this year 43 Vermont libraries were represented.

 

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  toptenTop 10 Tools to Use in Vermont Online Library 
  1. SEARCH ALERTS/RSS FEEDS - Make the resources work for you. Search Alerts/RSS Feeds will alert you when new articles are available for your topic. Look for the Create Search Alert link on search result pages or Create Journal Alert link on Publication Detail pages and follow the directions to set up as many as you like.
  2. SAVE LISTS - Your database shopping cart. Save articles as you find them (click the little checkbox or Save link) and they get added to your Save list. Look for the Saved Items link and you'll find all your items. Now you can print, e-mail, or cite them all in batch.
  3. CURRICULUM STANDARDS - Did you know Science In Context and Opposing Viewpoints In Context were built to work with state and national curriculum standards? And that the standards are linked to relevant topics in the resources? Check them out by clicking the Curriculum Standards button in black toolbar.
  4. LEXILE/CONTENT LEVELS - Lexile and/or Content Reading Levels are available for magazine, journal, and newspaper content in many Gale resources. You can see the level for each article and can limit your searches by them (using Advanced Search). If you don't see these options, call Gale Technical Support (1-800-877-4253) to enable these features.
  5. LANGUAGE TRANSLATION - Every article in Gale resources is available for on-demand language translation; it's a great way to help serve your ESL population. And even better, some offer audio as well.
  6. LISTEN - Speaking of audio, check out the Listen button available for most articles. This on-demand tool allows you to listen (or download for listening later) to any article you like. It's also a great tool for increasing reading comprehension.
  7. SUBJECT GUIDE - Subject Guide search is available in most Gale resources and is a much more guided approach to searching. You'll zero in on relevant articles while still allowing for manipulating your search.
  8. SHARE/BOOKMARK - These are great tools to bring users into your library's resources. Share takes advantage of popular Web 2.0 sharing sites like Facebook and Twitter. Bookmark uses a persistent URL to bring your users exactly where you want them and can be used on your library's web page or anywhere else you like.
  9. DOWNLOAD - Most articles offer HTML or PDF download options for each article. You can download these and make them available to yourself offline. It's a great tool for tablet reading.
  10. ACCESS MY LIBRARY APP - Our app allows for easy access from your mobile device (Apple or Droid). We have an app for Public, College, School (K-12), and special libraries. The Public library app works for anyone - find a library within a 10 mile radius and you automatically get access to Gale resources, no password required.

For more on each of these tools, check out the Help button in each resource or contact your Gale trainer, Stacey Knibloe at stacey.knibloe@cengage.com.

 

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moneyAsking for Money Outside Vermont 

Fundraising is one of the most important duties of every library board member. Often, Friends groups assist in this duty. Activities may include local events such as book sales, contests, or dinners, but some of this fundraising will entail direct appeals to donors, perhaps in the form of an annual or capital appeal letter. These are usually sent to a wide group of potential donors, some of whom may be second homeowners or seasonal visitors who reside outside Vermont. These communications, sent to out-of-state residents, have the potential to run afoul of those foreign jurisdictions' charitable solicitation laws. Thus, boards and Friends groups should be mindful of this issue.

 

Paid Solicitors in Vermont

A Vermont charitable entity is under no obligation to register or report its activities to any agency of State government. However, a professional fundraiser, hired specifically for the task of raising money for a Vermont nonprofit or charitable institution, must file a "notice of solicitation" with the Attorney General's Office in advance of each campaign, as well as a post-campaign financial report. In addition, these professionals must post a $20,000 bond, make specific disclosures when soliciting donations, and comply with the charity contract, script approval, donation deposit, record-keeping, and related requirements (9 V.S.A. 2471 et seq.). But, notice, it is the professional who must do this, not the charity itself. This is not the only requirement in most other states.

 

Soliciting out of State

Vermont is only one of 11 states with no charitable solicitation registration requirements. Others are : Delaware*; Idaho; Indiana; Iowa; Montana; Nebraska; Nevada; South Dakota, Texas and Wyoming. In the other 40 States and the District of Columbia, as well as all the Canadian Provinces, charities soliciting funds from residents of those jurisdictions are required to register with the Secretary of State, the Attorney General, or with a consumer protection agency prior to making the solicitation. Many of these jurisdictions have exemptions from the registration requirement for "educational" institutions (under which category, a public library might fall) or for solicitations which fall under some financial threshold for either the total amount received from the solicitation, or the total revenues of the organization soliciting.

 

The exemptions vary widely from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. California, for example, exempts "any charity organized in another state that is not "doing business" or holding property in California." Many states, however, including Maine, provide no exemptions of which a library or Friends group could avail itself.

 

*Delaware requires foreign charities appoint a registered agent for the service of process.

 

Websites as Solicitation

Many charitable organizations have a "donate now" button or link on their website. Clearly a website is discoverable by anyone with an internet capable computer. These may be residents of any state. Does this constitute a solicitation? Is it necessary for a charitable organization that has such a feature on its website to register with every jurisdiction in the world that might claim jurisdiction? Because this is such a very new concept, the law is very unclear about this. A number of States insist that, yes, a "donate now" button does invoke that State's jurisdiction. Maine is one of these jurisdictions, for example.

 

The Charleston Principles

In 1999, a group of participants at a conference of National Association of State Charity Officials (NASCO)( http://www.nasconet.org/category/info-charities/) held a discussion of this very difficult problem. They developed a set of principles that they thought were helpful in evaluating the significance or impact of a charity's impact, as these relate to jurisdiction. These came to be known as the Charleston Principles.

 

These principles place a burden of registration on a soliciting organization in limited circumstances. These are:

1. An entity that is domiciled within a state and uses the Internet to conduct charitable solicitations in that state; or

2. An entity that is domiciled outside the State, if

a. Its non-Internet activities alone would be sufficient to require registration;

b. The entity solicits contributions through an interactive Web site; and either the entity:

i. Specifically targets persons physically located in the state for solicitation, or

ii. Receives contributions from the state on a repeated and ongoing basis or a substantial basis through its Web site; or

c. The entity solicits contributions through a site that is not interactive, but either specifically:

i. invites further offline activity to complete a contribution, or establishes other contacts with that state, such as sending e-mail messages or other communications that promote the Web site; and

ii. The entity satisfies one of the conditions listed in paragraph 2b.

 

Not every State has adopted these Principles, and they do not have the force of law, except in those jurisdictions where there has been legislative action to adopt them. They are merely guidelines. Nonetheless, for charities with a "donate now" button on their website, these principles hold out the hope that a growing group of state administrators recognize the duty to enforce state law in a somewhat rational fashion.

 

Practical considerations

The agencies of State and Provincial government that administer and enforce the registration regulations do not, as a general proposition, seek out foreign charitable organizations for prosecution under their laws. They are busy enough with resident organizations. In most cases, a foreign organization will only come to the attention of the agency if someone brings the solicitation to their attention, usually because someone is unhappy with the organization making the request. However, there are other actions that may draw an agency's attention, such as an innocent inquiry from a solicitee as to the legitimacy of the organization, or large numbers of solicitations being made of their citizens. Thus, libraries and Friends groups that want to insure absolute compliance with the all laws, should register in every jurisdiction in which they solicit contributions. If they have a donation button on their website, they should register in every jurisdiction in the United States, Canada and the rest of the world, including not just every state or province, but any county, department, division, or municipality within those jurisdictions that have been empowered to require such registrations.

 

Practically, this may not be possible. Thus libraries may want to consider some of the following actions:

 

1) Check with an attorney before sending out an appeal.

2) Libraries located close to the borders of Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York or Quebec should take particular notice of those jurisdictions' requirements for registration, and if substantial numbers of requests are being sent into these jurisdictions, comply with the registration requirements of that state or province, or seek an appropriate exemption, if qualified.

3) All libraries and Friends groups ought to take a look at their list of donors and all addresses to which appeal letters will be sent. If there are significant numbers of letters to second homeowners or part time residents, who have provided mailing addresses outside Vermont, consider complying with the registration requirements of those jurisdictions, or make sure that any solicitation mail is sent only to the Vermont address, even though other correspondence may be sent to the primary home address.

4) If your web presence includes a "donate now" button, be sure that it complies with the "Charleston Principles."

5) On your registration materials, ask registrants to answer a question, or check a box for a question which might be phrased, "May the Library or its Friends group send you solicitations for contributions at the addresses listed on this form?" This may have the effect of re-characterizing any mailing as "solicited" and not "unsolicited."

 

Resources

There are two valuable websites that will aid in your understanding of the requirements:

LawForChange:

http://www.lawforchange.org/images/lfc/State_Fundraising_Registration_Requirements.pdf

 

National Association of State Charity Officials (NASCO): an association of state offices charged with oversight of charitable organizations and charitable solicitation in the United States:


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newNew in the Library Science Collection 

These titles may be borrowed from the Department of Libraries.

 

Collection Development in the Digital Age. London: Facet Publishing, 2012.

 

De Saulles, Martin. Information 2.0: New Models of Information Production, Distribution and Consumption. London: Facet, 2012.

 

Elguindi, Anne C. Electronic Resource Management: Practical Perspectives in a New Technical Services Model. Oxford: Chandos Publishing, 2012.

 

MacKellar, Pamela H. Writing Successful Technology Grant Proposals: A LITA Guide. New York : Neal-Schuman Publishers, Inc., c2012.

 

Millar, Laura. Archives: Principles and Practices. New York: Neal-Schuman Publishers, 2010.

 

Owen, Patricia. A 21st-century Approach to School librarian Evaluation. Chicago: American Association of School Librarians, c2012.

 

Pedley, Paul. Essential Law for Information Professionals. London: Facet, 2011.

 

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