null
September 19, 2013
null
Salk concert series will bring together virtuosos of music and science

From its inception, the Salk Institute has seamlessly merged both science and art at the highest levels, creating a unique environment to the benefit of humanity. It is in this spirit that the Salk presents a new program meant to both amaze and inspire: The Salk Science and Music Series.

 

Prompted by a magnificent gift of Steinway Concert Grand #191 from generous Salk benefactor Conrad Prebys, the Institute has organized an ambitious program that melds both amazing science and inspiring music for the San Diego community.

 

Running from October through May, the six concert series will not only provide a venue for outstanding performances from the most talented emerging musicians, but will also include riveting scientific presentations of the latest scientific discoveries occurring in Salk labs. At the midpoint of each concert, one of the Institute's renowned faculty will briefly share their most recent insights and discoveries. This special blend of art and science will set this program apart from all others.

 

For general information or to purchase tickets over the phone please visit the series website at www.salk.edu/music or contact us at music@salk.edu or 858-453-4100 x 2098. 

 

President's Club members can attend the concert for free and join a private reception following each performance hosted by the featured Salk scientist and President William Brody. 

 

  Salk Science & Music Series

Back to Basics 

Twice a year, Salk presents "
Back to Basics," a program introducing the Institute's science to the general public. On October 2, 2013, Marguerite Prior, Ph.D., M.D. will speak about her research in a talk titled "Spicing Up Alzheimer's Drug Discovery." 

For additional information, please contact:

Cheryl Dean, Esq.
Sr. Director, Planned Giving
Phone: 858 453-4100 ext. 2068
E-mail: cdean@salk.edu   

Click here to RSVP for this event» 

 

null
Click here to watch video» 

Congratulations

 

Tatyana Sharpee Tatyana Sharpee has received a CAREER award from the National Science Foundation (NSF). She and her team in the Computational Neurobiology Laboratory work on theoretical principles of how the brain processes information.
 
The CAREER award will support Sharpee's proposed study: "Characterizing feature selectivity and invariance in deep neural architectures." In an effort to help elucidate the principles that make robust object recognition possible, she will explore how an organism's neurons are able to demonstrate both "invariance" which produces a similar response to the same object even when observed from different viewpoints, and "selectivity" which requires different responses to potentially quite similar objects. The results of her study will help reveal the common principles of sensory processing in the brain and may ultimately lead to improved designs of artificial recognition systems, including sensory prostheses.
 

Read more» 

 

 


Scientific discovery at the Salk Institute is made possible through annual contributions from individuals, organizations, corporations and foundations. Your support will accelerate the pace of breakthroughs in understanding disease and pave the way to new drug therapies.

Donate Now 
Pedal the Cause

 

The Salk Institute is very excited to be part of the first annual Pedal the Cause San Diego----an epic weekend cycling event on October 26 and 27 to benefit San Diego's three cancer centers:  the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, UC San Diego's Moores Cancer Center and Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute.

Pedal the Cause

Front left to right: John Young, Maryam Ahmadian, Sam Pfaff, Michael Sullivan, Matthew Lewsey

Back row: Kevin Waldrop, Mara Sherman, Henry Juguilon, Nick White

Click here to support Salk Cancer Center team» 

 

Pedal the Cause San Diego's aim is to raise much-needed funds for cancer research and to promote stronger relationships among San Diego's complementary research centers. Their ultimate goal is to expedite innovative cancer treatments from the labs to the patient's bedside by encouraging collaboration.


Pedal the Cause
Science News 

A study conducted by Greg Lemke and John Young identified a powerful mechanism by which viruses such as influenza, West Nile and Dengue evade the body's immune response and infect people. The findings may provide scientists with a target for new antiviral therapies.

  

Researchers find mechanism viruses use to shut down the body's defenses

 Vaccine News Daily 

  


 

Satchin Panda and his team have discovered a compound that switches off light sensitivity without affecting vision----research that could pave the way toward treating migraines or circadian rhythm imbalances. Panda found that chemicals called opsinamides could knock out melanopsin's activity, removing the pupil's reaction to bright light, but leaving other visual receptors undisturbed.
Read more» 

  

Researchers Find New Drug That Could Ward Off Migraines

Yahoo News

  


   

Tom Albright's lab has developed a novel model system that bridges cellular and human studies of schizophrenia. The new model, which involves monitoring the brain activity, could help to accelerate research on schizophrenia and other neurological diseases.
Read more» 

  

New model to study schizophrenia has been developed
Medical News Daily 

 

 
Quote of the Month

 

"Intuition will tell the thinking mind where to look next." - Jonas Salk, 1914-1995


null
 Image courtesy of Adrian Torkington, Fotografica on behalf of the
Salk Institute for Biological Studies

Issue: 8 
null
Explore
Back to Basics
Congratulations
Pedal the Cause
Science News
Quote of the Month

Upcoming Events

 

 

Back to Basics Lecture

Spicing Up Alzheimer's Drug Discovery

October 2, 2013

 More»  

 

 

 

Salk Science & Music Series 
Featuring Pianist Sean Chen
and Scientist Fred Gage 

 

October 6, 2013

 More» 

  

 


 

Salkexcellerators 

New York reception

October 30, 2013

 More»  

 

 

 

Pedal the Cause

October 26-27, 2013

 More» 

    

 

 


FEATURED IMAGE

 

null  

This month's image courtesy of Leah Boyer, in the Gage Lab.

 

Pictured are human neural stem cells, derived from embryonic stem cells, and labeled with fluorescent antibodies against Sox2 (nuclear) and nestin (cytoplasmic). They can differentiate into both neurons and glia, and are used to model human brain diseases.

 

 

Each month our featured image will provide a shot of art and science. Download the image and use it as your desktop computer wallpaper, smartphone background or facebook timeline photo.
Download» 

 


Communications
Salk Institute
858-453-4100