TopofemailSharing Our Stake in Maryland's Public SafetyMarch 2014

        The Public Safety Stakeholder  
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An E-publication of the 
Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services 
for our Criminal Justice and Community Partners 
       www.dpscs.maryland.gov   

Did You See Us

in the News?

 

Recent sightings of our public safety efforts in your local media are updated daily on the DPSCS homepage

 

Recent headlines: 

 

Cumberland Times- Online 3/8/2014

Goal: Make NBCI most secure Md. maximum security prison 

 

Baltimore Sun- Online 3/10/2014

After a conviction, help for incarcerated veterans 

 

Government Technology 3/19/2014

Keeping Inmates Honest (with Technology) 

 

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 DPSCS' mission is to protect the public, our employees and those under our supervision.

Seal
Governor Martin O'Malley
 Lt. Governor Anthony G. Brown
 DPSCS Secretary Gregg Hershberger 
 
 
 At  the Metropolitan Transition Center (MTC), inmates are growing plants that will seed vacant-lots-turned-gardens around the city.See more pictures on our Facebook page. 

This Month's Featured Stories: 

Gavel  keeping communities safe 
KCStop

New K-9 Graduates Sniff Out Contraband

 

The DPSCS internationally recognized K-9 unit recently received seven new graduates, bolstering the fight for sniffing out contraband in Maryland correctional institutions.

 

Most of the dogs trained by DPSCS came from rescue units, shelters and animal control agencies. For the last six years, the K-9 Unit has averaged 93,000 searches annually. The unit's 49 dogs detect cell phones, drugs, tobacco and other contraband. In the last two fiscal years, the dogs have found 1,300 pieces of contraband.

 

          

 

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Human Capital  believing in human capital
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Giving HOPE to Hounds and Men

 

One of the most unique restorative justice programs in DPSCS is the HOPE Hounds partnership at Roxbury Correctional Institution in Hagerstown. Officially, it's Hounds of Prison Education, but in simple terms, it's a program that gives real hope to hounds and men alike.  

 

 

 

PSW  public safety works
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Where the Grass in Greener

 

Maryland offenders are partnering with the University of Maryland Baltimore County to grow special grasses that they hope will turn some of Baltimore's vacant lots in into green fields. UMBC provided a greenhouse, and inmates built a second on their own, to cultivate the grasses that everyone hopes will survive the summer - when normal grass tends to burn and turn brown.

 

 

 

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New K-9 Graduates Sniff Out Contraband
continued

 

 

"With over 800 cell phones detected since 2009, the K-9 training program is a critical part of our strategy to drive down crime in correctional facilities," said Gov. Martin O'Malley who attended the graduation.

 

The FY2015 administration budget includes $563,000 to expand the unit by seven positions. "Because contraband breeds violence, stopping it from getting into our institutions and finding it if it does will always be a top priority for this department," DPSCS Secretary Gregg Hershberger said. "With over 800 cell phones detected since 2009, the K-9 training program is a critical part of our strategy to drive down crime in correctional facilities," said Gov. Martin O'Malley who attended the graduation.

 

 

The FY2015 administration budget includes $563,000 to expand the unit by seven positions. "Because contraband breeds violence, stopping it from getting  into our institutions and finding it if it does will always be a top priority for this department," DPSCS Secretary Gregg Hershberger said.

 

 

 

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bhc
Giving HOPE to Hounds and Men

 

Started in late 2011, the program works with the Central Pennsylvania Animal Alliance. Dogs that have been difficult to adopt are sent to the prison, where carefully selected inmates work with and train them.

 

The results have been amazing. Inmates have made 54 dogs successful adoption candidates. In plainer terms: thanks to the Roxbury staff and inmates, 54 dogs that might have been put down now have permanent homes with loving families. Secretary Gregg Hershberger, who started the program when he was the warden at RCI, said the benefits to both man and dog have been great and have spread beyond the inmate dog handlers.  "We see a calming influence throughout the housing unit, and there's no question that both the men and the dogs are being given a great second chance."

 

Believing in human capital sometimes means having non-human partners, and the HOPE Hounds program is evidence of the tremendous restorative justice value of such an effort.

 

 

  
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"It's an amazing feeling," said Nathan Boone, one of eight offenders on the project.  "You get to learn a trade that you can take out to the street and you can beautify your own neighborhood."

 

UMBC plans to work on 28 vacant lots throughout the city. The plan is to dovetail the project with another at the Maryland Correctional Institution for Women, where they are learning organic gardening. Produce from the lots will be provided to neighbors with the extra being given to local charities.

 

"Everyone I've dealt with in the department has been great, they've been fantastic," said Chris Swan, a UMBC associate professor of geography and environmental science spearheading the project.

 

Bill Merritt, the executive director of the Environment, Safety and Emergency Operations for the Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services, initiated the effort after getting the idea from a conference. "The program has done nothing but grow," Merritt said. "It's doing really well."

 

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