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Newcomers Corner

Newcomers... don't stay NEW for long
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Newsletter by Newcomer Information Centre
Scheduled Events

Mississauga: Canadian Citizenship on Tuesday, April 15 at 1:30pm

Brampton City South: Active Assist Program on Tuesday, April 15 at 2:00pm

Malton: Immigration Issues on Monday, April 28 at 10:00am 

Brampton East: Financial Literacy/Budgeting on Wednesday, April 9 at 10:00am
 
Oakville: Halton Small Business Centre on Friday, April 11 at 9:30am 

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French-Speaking Newcomers Now Eligible for Tuition-Free ESL Classes

The Ontario government is expanding its English as a Second Language (ESL) program in communities across the province to provide francophone immigrants with more opportunities to succeed and find work. By expanding its ESL program to newcomers whose first language is French, Ontario will add approximately 1,000 additional learners to the current enrollment of 120,000 immigrants who access tuition-free language training each year. These programs are currently available through 37 local English and French school boards, at over 300 locations across the province

Please refer to www.immigrationfrancophone-ontario.ca website for more information. 

Note: Website is in French

 
For more information please visit our centre or email: nic@tcet.com
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Improving Financial Aid for Post-Secondary Students  
 
The Ontario Government continues its commitment to making post-secondary education accessible, based on the ability to learn not the ability to pay. Improvements to student aid for 2013-2014 are making student aid programs some of the most generous in Canada. Changes for 2013-2014 include:
 
-Increasing the 30% off Ontario Tuition Grant to $1,730 for university or college degree programs; and $790 for college diploma or certificate programs.
 
-Providing a grant of $500 per month to help cover living costs for youth aged 21 to 24 who are leaving care and enrollment is OSAP eligible college and university programs.       
 
-Extending the interest free grace period on student loans for college and university graduates who start their own business or volunteer for the Pan/Parapan Am games.
 
-Ontario will limit the amount of OSAP debt students need to repay to $7300 for a 2 term-academic year and $10,950 for three terms. 
 
For more information contact nic@tcet.com
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NewYouth.ca  
 
NewYouth.ca is your first link for accurate, accessible and easy to understand information about issues important to youth of today-- as a newcomer in particular, but also as a young Canadian. Check out: www.newyouth.ca
 

 

For more information please visit our centre or email: nic@tcet.com

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Youth Corner 

  

How can I help my child with making an informed career choice?

 

1. Keep their academic options open: In secondary school, the courses your child chooses can be important determinants of their future career direction. many adolescents are not ready to make career decisions in high school; others change their mind. Encourage your child to keep their academic options open by speaking with their teachers or guidance counsellors. 
 
2. Find the right fit: In order to make good decisions, your child needs an assessment of their interests as well as their abilities and achievement levels. Report cards, test results and your child's teachers and guidance counsellors can help with this. 
 
3. Come up with a realistic plan: Some adolescents may be unrealistic in their potential choices, not considering the competition, opportunities and their abilities. While it is healthy to dream and consider different ideas, at some point a realistic plan needs to be set in place.
 
4. Discover what they like: Providing varied experiences for your child offers an opportunity for exploration, building skills and developing interests. These do not have to be expensive, and could include exposure to outdoor activities, music, cooking, architectural tours, etc. The more they know about, the better informed they can be about what they like, what is happening in the world, and what career options are out there. 

5. Learn about what you do: Sharing your own career journey and what you do at your job can be very useful. However, keep in mind that your knowledge of current work trends, as well as academic and professional requirements, may need to be updated. 
 
6. Build flexibility into their plan: Life would be really easy, predictable and possibly boring if our first choices always worked out. You can help your child come up with a number of career options that would suit them. 
 
7. Find the right balance: It's natural to be concerned about economic security, but finding meaningful work is also important for personal satisfaction. Some people have a strong desire to work with their hands, work with children, prepare food or own their own business. You can help your child find a way to respect these desires and also maintain financial security.
 
8. Research the labour market: Help your child find out about salaries, job prospects, and working conditions. But keep in mind that choosing a career based solely on economic projections and job prospects doesn't always work. There will always be events that are impossible to predict and that will have a major impact on the job market, whether they are due to politics, shifts in economy, natural disasters or technological advances. Choosing a career based on interests and reasonable job prospects reduces the chances that your child will feel cheated if opportunities are limited by the time they graduate from college or university.    
 
9. Seek professional advice: A professional opinion is useful even if it just confirms a direction, and there are cases when it becomes even more important. These cases include, but arent limited to: high school students whose aspirations and plans are out of line with their academic achievements, undecided students in the last years of secondary school, college or university students who are still unfocused or dissatisfied wit their current studies, students whose plans rely on areas of weakness, and even those who dislike school and are ready to go to work without developing some marketable skills. 
 
10. Find Counselling: High school students can consult with their guidance counsellor. College and university students can talk to counsellors at their institution. Other good resources include youth programs and employment agencies, as well as family and private counsellors. If you have an Employee Assistance Program through your work, this service could also be useful.  
 
NOTE: Retrieved and copyrighted by:  Ontario Council of Agencies Serving Immigrants (OCASI) 
 

For more information regarding volunteer opportunities in your community, please connect with one of our Youth Information Counsellors by calling (905) 949-0049 ext. 1290 or via e-mail at nicyouth@tcet.com

Did you know?

New fee for replacing Canadian Passports effective March 31, 2014. 

 

For more information visit our centres or email: nic@tcet.com

 

Join us on 
 
 Legal Aid Ontario to Streamline the Refugee Intake Process 

 Find out more about the Ontario Provincial Nominee Program on our page

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Feedback and Submissions
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Service providers, we are happy to promote new programs and events at your agency through this newsletter. 

Sincerely, 
Newsletter Team
nic@tcet.com

About Us  

The Newcomer Information Centre is an innovative program that provides free settlement information to newcomers and residents from a number of accessible locations across Peel and Halton.   

 

A smooth transition into Canadian life is critical to success and our program provides accurate referrals to make this happen.  Clients work with friendly multi-lingual staff and get confidential counselling about settlement, employment, health, housing, education, language training, immigration issues and more.  Counsellors speak Punjabi, Spanish, Arabic, Urdu, Farsi, Mandarin, Cantonese, Romanian, Croatian, Russian, Serbian, French, German, Polish, Swahili, Tamil, Hindi, Bulgarian and Pashto.

 

Drop by at any of our locations to speak with a counsellor.  No appointment is required. 

 

 Our locations 

  

***Care for Newcomer Children services available at Malton and Oakville locations***

 ***Free Commissioner of Oaths service at all locations***

 

NIC Itinerant services: Locations

 

 


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