Update
  A Newsletter for the HHQI Underserved Populations (UP) Network                       March 2015
 
 Welcome to the Underserved Population e-newsletter, the UPDate.This quarterly newsletter      provides several summaries of news or research that effects underserved populations which    may include:Heath disparities, underserved regions, dually-eligible, or small home health  agencies.
 
Underserved Population (UP) Network Announcements


 
Chronic Health Issues Affecting Hispanic Patients

Wednesday, April 22, 2015  |  2-4pm (ET) 

 

* Learn about chronic disease issues (e.g., diabetes and hypertension) affecting Hispanic patients
* Discuss about health issues/barriers affecting elderly people in      Hispani
c communities 

* Discover ideas to reduce barriers and improve patient care and      outcomes

 

Guest Speaker:  Viviana Lozano, BSN, RN, Hospice Case Manager, VNA Health Group, NJ and Chairperson of Marketing and Public Relations for Garden State chapter of  National Association of Hispanic Nurses (NAHN). 

 

Registration is now open. 

Did you miss the last UP Networking Event?
 
Home Health Scope of Practice for Therapists is an excellent presentation by:
  
* Bud Langham, PT, MBA, COS-C, Chief Clinical Officer, Encompass Home Health and Hospice
* Ken Miller, PT, DPT, CEEAA, Clinical Educator, Catholic Home Care

The content revolved around:
 
* Roles of PTs, OTs, and SLPs in home health
* Expectations of each discipline within their Scope of Practice to improve patient care and outcomes

The presentation generated an overwhelming number of questions, which many were not addressed due to time limitation. A Webinar Q & A document was created and is now posted. Bud Langham and Ken Miller address the additional Q & As and provides references in the Webinar Q&A document.
 
Click here for recording, handouts, and Q & A document.
  

 

UP News & Highlights


April is only few short weeks away - thankfully that means spring will be coming - a welcome relief to much of the country. A time of renewal. So should it be for our commitment to reduce health disparities. April is designated as National Minority Health month


In this issue, we will take a brief look at how disparities affect chronic disease prevalence.


 

United States Facts:

  • Dual-eligible home health users have a 10% higher rate of 5 or more chronic conditions than non-dual home health users (58% vs. 48%) (Avalere Chartbook 2014)
  • Heart Disease (CDC, 2012)
    • Leading cause of death for African American, Hispanic, and white populations
    • Second cause of death for Asian/Pacific Islander, and American Indian/Alaska Native populations in U.S.
    • Population percentages of all heart disease deaths in 2008
      •  African American (24.5%)
      •  White (25.1%)
      •  Asian or Pacific Islander (23.2%)
      •  Hispanic (20.8%)
      •  American Indian or Alaska Native (18.0%)
    • Heart disease death rates highest in the South and lowest in the West 
  • Diabetes (CDC, 2012)
    • Diabetes breakdown for race/ethnic groups for adults 20 years of age and older
      • American Indian/Alaska Native (15.9%)
      • Non-Hispanic Black (13.2%)
      • Hispanic (12.8%)
      • Asian American/Pacific Islander (9.0%)
      • Non-Hispanic White (7.6%)
  • Obesity (CDC, 2010)
    • Obesity, socioeconomic status, and race/ethnic groups
      • Look at the table below and notice that the obesity rates are opposite for gender related to socioeconomic status
Income at or above 350% poverty levels
Income below 130% poverty level

Males
  • All males (33%)
  • Non-Hispanic black males (44%)
  • Hispanic males (41%)
  • White males (no differences)
Males
  • All males (29%)
  • Non-Hispanic black males (29%)
  • Hispanic males (30%)
  • White males (no differences)

Females

  • All females (29%)
  • Non-Hispanic white females (28%)
  • All other female race/ethnic groups similar
Females
  • All females (42%)
  • Non-Hispanic white females (39%)
  • All other female race/ethnic groups similar
    • Education level
      • Obesity prevalence increases as education decreases for women
      • No significant trend for men 
  • Cancer (CDC, 2012)
    • Overall cancer incidence
      • Males - most rates are slowly declining
        • African American men have the highest rate of cancer, followed by white men
        • Hispanic men are third, followed by Asian/Pacific Island and American Indian/Alaska Native men
      • Females
        • White women are closely followed by African American women
        • Hispanic women are third, followed by Asian/Pacific Island and American Indian/Alaska Native women
    • Breast cancer incidence
      • White females have the highest incidence followed closely by African American women
      • Hispanic women follow with Asian Pacific Islander females at almost the same rate 
      • American Indian/Alaska Native women are at the lowest rate
    • Prostate cancer incidence
      • African American men are significantly higher than any race/ethnic group
      • White and Hispanics men follow
      • Asian/Pacific Islander and American Indian/Alaska Native follow at a lower rate
    • Also see statistics on cervical, colorectal, HPV-associated, lung, skin, and uterine cancers

 

Tools & Resources 

Coming May 1, 2015 - Fundamental Focus: Cardiovascular Health for Underserved Populations BPIP and Clinician Video

 

For more information or to suggest future UP topics or speakers, please contact us at HHQI@wvmi.org.

  
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Click here for more information about the HHQI National Campaign.
  
 

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