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April 2013 - In This Issue:
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SAVE THE DATE! BEACH GENERAL MEMBERSHIP MEETING ON JUNE 18
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Mark your calendars for the BEACH Community Partnership's General Membership meeting on Tuesday, June 18 at the Church of the Holy Family, 1279 N. Great Neck Rd. (time TBA).
  
Preview of Meeting:
  • Election of New Officers
  • Updates on:
    • Ten Year Plan to End Homelessness
    • Housing Crisis Response System Study & Development of Implementation Plan
    • Proposed Housing Resource Center

Stay tuned for more details! 


BEACH, which stands for Bringing an End to All City Homelessness, is a partnership of city, nonprofit and faith-based organizations seeking to better address homelessness through enhanced cooperation and communication, coordinated service delivery, resource development and new strategies.
  
The partnership is continually looking for active volunteers and organizations to join in planning and conducting projects in areas including family homelessness, single homelessness, advocacy and education, disconnected youth, service coordination and more!
  
HAMPTON ROADS COMMUNITY FOUNDATION RELEASES STUDY OF VIRGINIA BEACH HOUSING CRISIS RESPONSE SYSTEM
Report Provides Recommendations for Preventing & Ending Homelessness Better
building blocksThe Hampton Roads Community Foundation presented a study of the Virginia Beach Housing Crisis Response System to the City Council on April 16. The study is intended to provide the city, the foundation, nonprofit service providers and faith organizations with a guide to creating an improved system that meets federal requirements and implementing best practices in order to do a better job of preventing and ending homelessness.
  
Housing and Neighborhood Preservation will begin working with other city agencies, service providers and faith organizations through the BEACH Community Partnership to consider the recommendations and to develop an implementation plan. A prioritized list of actions and identification of any barriers will be reported to the City Manager in late June/early July.
  
HOUSING & NEIGHBORHOOD PRESERVATION CELEBRATES DECADES OF EXPANDING HOUSING OPPORTUNITIES & PROMOTING VIBRANT WELL-MAINTAINED NEIGHBORHOODS
Virginia Beach Celebrates its 50th Anniversary and Looks Back at its History, Milestones and Successes
While the rapid development and expansion of Virginia Beach was underway in the 1980s, many of our city's historically African American neighborhoods lacked modern sewer, water or storm drainage systems. The department was established more than 40 years ago as the Department of Housing and Community Development to improve housing conditions and provide standard municipal services in 12 neighborhoods in Virginia Beach.  
  
From 1986 to 1994, the city implemented a target neighborhood plan to provide necessary upgrades and improvements for approximately 4,000 housing units in these neighborhoods. Upon completion of the project, the city had invested $50 million in revitalization efforts.
  
"The completion of the planned improvements was one of the biggest projects the department has ever taken on and one of the most important," said Andrew Friedman, director of Housing and Neighborhood Preservation.
  
Since then, the department has expanded to five divisions, added programs for affordable home repair loans, worked to increase the number of affordable housing units in the city and administer the Housing Choice Voucher Program for nearly 2,000 households. In the next issue of Connections, we'll highlight the history of the department's Code Enforcement efforts.
  
For detailed information on Virginia Beach 50th Anniversary events and attractions, including "50 Days of Fun" and "50 Ways to Live The Life," please visit www.VBLivingTheLife.com.
CODE ENFORCEMENT TIPS FOR SPRING
Spring is officially here! That means brighter days, slightly warmer weather and, of course, time for spring cleaning. As you roll up your sleeves and get out those brooms, dust pans and gardening tools, Code Enforcement wants you to keep a few tips in mind, especially during this season and the warmer months that follow:

WASTE DISPOSAL
  • Exercise proper waste disposal practices when cleaning out attics, garages and sheds. Regular household trash can be placed in city-provided containers and set out for collection no later than 7 a.m. on the scheduled collection day. Curbside collection of yard waste in clear plastic bags and small, four-foot piles of limbs occurs each scheduled collection day as well.
  • When getting rid of bulkier items (i.e. old furniture, household appliances and machinery), residents should call Waste Management at 385-4650 and schedule a bulk item collection for your next scheduled collection day. Waste Management does not pick up the following items: building materials, carpet, doors, cabinets, toilets, sinks, rocks, dirt, concrete, vehicle parts, tires, paint cans, glass, propane tanks and hazardous materials. Residents can dispose of these items directly at two city landfill facilities free of charge.
  • The city encourages residents to recycle and provides curbside collection of recyclables every other week in most areas. 

For more information on waste disposal regulations and approved recyclable materials, contact Waste Management at 385-4650.  

LAWN CARE & PROPERTY MAINTENANCE
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  • Unkempt lawns and weeds are not only unsightly, but they can also serve as an inviting playground for rodents and vermin. To prevent potential infestations, residents are required to keep their yards maintained in accordance with the city code. Grass and weeds taller than 10 inches must be cut, and all trash, junk and debris stored on your property must be properly disposed of using the waste disposal tips listed above.
  • Improperly maintained swimming pools can provide a breeding ground for mosquitoes, which can spread disease. Be sure to maintain your swimming pools and filtration systems to prevent mosquito infestations during the warmer months. 
  • Code Enforcement recommends residents have the health of large trees on their property evaluated by a licensed professional on a regular basis. Proactive and consistent maintenance of trees can help prevent costly work and removals when trees are deemed hazardous. 

By taking these steps, we can help keep Virginia Beach neighborhoods vibrant, safe and beautiful places to live. For more information on the city's property maintenance code requirements, contact Code Enforcement at 385-4421.   

PROGRAM HELPS MAKE HOMES MORE ACCESSIBLE FOR PHYSICALLY DISABLED
emergency repair afterHousing and Neighborhood Preservation can help make your home safer and more accessible through our Emergency Home Repair Program. The program offers affordable loans to assist with emergency repairs, which are not of a cosmetic nature and are required to remove health and safety hazards.This includes modifications to make homes more accessible for the physically disabled.
  
Renters of single-family units in need of accessibility modifications may also apply for the program. To be eligible, the property owner must agree to the improvements and be willing to sign a new 12-month lease with the tenant/applicant with no increase in the current rent.
  
Other eligibility requirements and conditions apply. Assistance is provided based on the availability of funding. For more information, contact Olin Walden at 385-5760.
  
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fair housing logoVIRGINIA BEACH HOUSING AND NEIGHBORHOOD PRESERVATION DOES BUSINESS IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE FEDERAL FAIR HOUSING LAW AND SECTION 504 PROGRAM ACCESSIBILITY REQUIREMENTS. THE DEPARTMENT COMPLIES WITH THE FAIR HOUSING ACT AND PROVIDES REASONABLE ACCOMMODATIONS AND MODIFICATIONS TO PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES. VIRGINIA BEACH HOUSING AND NEIGHBORHOOD PRESERVATION DOES NOT DISCRIMINATE ON THE BASES OF RACE, COLOR, RELIGION, SEX, DISABILITY, FAMILIAL STATUS, NATIONAL ORIGIN, SEXUAL ORIENTATION OR GENDER IDENTITY IN ADMISSION OR ACCESS TO ITS PROGRAMS.