JAMsj E-News
Japanese American Museum of San Jose

March 2015
In This Issue
Hinamatsuri
Tohoku Update 2015
Jerome and Rohwer Interviews
Women's History Month Panel
Hidden Legacy + "Take the JA Train"
Japanese Woodblock Printmaking
Book Club: Bend With the Wind
Presentation: Traditions in Japanese Architecture
JAMsj Blog: The Importance of Japanese American Traditions
Calendar of Events
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Quick Links
Kids Cultural Event
  
Hina Matsuri 
New Kimekomi set
Photo courtesy of May Matsuzaki
Sunday, March 1, 2015 
11:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. 

  

Japanese American Museum of San Jose
535 N. Fifth Street
San Jose, CA  95112

 

The Japanese Doll Festival (Hina Matsuri), or Girls' Day, is a festival celebrated by families who have girls, wishing their daughters good health and growth. Traditionally, beautiful dolls representing the emperor, empress, attendants, and musicians were handcrafted especially for the occasion. The custom of displaying dolls began during the Heian period, when people believed the dolls possessed the power to contain bad spirits.

 

Come, bring your children to this special Girl's Day celebration at JAMsj. There will be traditional Hina Matsuri dolls, as well as more unique doll exhibits, and wonderful craft projects for both boys and girls.

 

Hina Matsuri dolls will be on display on Saturday and Sunday.

 

Cost: Free with admission to the museum (nonmembers, $5; students and seniors over age 65, $3; JAMsj members and children under 12, free). An additional materials fee may apply.

  

International Exchange
  
Tohoku Update 2015:  The Next Generation

 

Saturday, March 7, 2015
5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. 

  

Japanese American Museum of San Jose
535 N. Fifth Street
San Jose, CA  95112 
Minamisanriku & Los Gatos High School 

 

The Japanese American Museum of San Jose (JAMsj) is hosting "Tohoku Update 2015: The Next Generation" to share what three groups of high school students in Tohoku have been doing to help their hometowns recover from the devastation of the 2011 disaster. With help from high school students in California, the Tohoku students have been working on projects to bring back tourism to the Tohoku region.

 

Sendai & Wesley UMC 
The projects have involved an exchange in history, culture, and language between the Japanese and American students. The
Ishinomaki & Harker School 
three different groups will each share their message in a short presentation.We will then have live, one-on-one Skype video calls with the students from the Tohoku region, followed by a Q&A session. This will give participants a chance to interact with and hear what the Tohoku students are doing to make a difference in their hometowns.

 

 

There is no cost for this event.

By invitation. For more information, contact PublicPrograms@JAMsj.org 

  

Community Appeal
  
 Seeking Former Jerome and Rohwer Internees 

Monday - Wednesday
, March 9 - 11, 2015

  

Japanese American Museum of San Jose
535 N. Fifth Street
San Jose, CA  95112

 

Dr. Rebecca Barrett-Fox from Arkansas State University will be at the Japanese American Museum of San Jose (JAMsj) to interview Jerome and Rohwer internees or family members on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday, March 9, 10, and 11. She is interested in collecting stories from Bay Area people associated with the Arkansas camps. If you are interested in being interviewed, please contact Sharon Osaki Wong at (650) 493-7519 or sharonosaki@yahoo.com for more information. Wong, who was born in Jerome and now lives in the Bay Area, is shown in the photo of the Rohwer site. She returns to Arkansas annually for a reunion of fellow internees at the Jerome-Rohwer Interpretive Museum and Visitor Center.

 

Sharon Osaki Wong at the Rohwer Relocation Center
Memorial Cemetery
Photo courtesy of Sharon Osaki Wong
 
 
Contact Sharon Osaki Wong at (650) 493-7519 or sharonosaki@yahoo.com for more information or to schedule an interview

  

Women's History Month
  
Not Your Typical Nisei: JA Women and Adventures in Identity

  

Saturday, March 14, 2015
1:00 p.m.  

  

Japanese American Museum of San Jose
535 N. Fifth Street
San Jose, CA  95112

Join us at the Japanese American Museum of San Jose (JAMsj) on March 14 for a lively discussion on how expectations and stereotypes have challenged and shaped Japanese American (JA) women, as well as the development of their identities. Using the experiences of two Japanese American women, Emiko and Chizu Omori, as a jumping-off point, well-known activist Susan Hayase will be our moderator. She will lead a discussion on the familial, cultural, and societal expectations and restrictions facing JA women and how we have learned to navigate them in the course of creating our own identities as JA women.  

     Susan Hayase           Emiko Omori                    Chizu Omori 

Read more... 

 

  

Cost: Free with admission to the museum (nonmembers, $5; students and seniors over age 65, $3; JAMsj members and children under 12, free). 

Contact PublicPrograms@jamsj.org or call (408) 294-3138 to reserve a spot.

 

Special Event
   
 
 Hidden Legacy + "Take the JA Train"

Saturday, March 21, 2015
5:00 p.m.

  

Wesley United Methodist Church

566 N. Fifth Street
San Jose, CA  95112

 

Robert Handa, NBC Bay Area reporter

The Japanese American Museum of San Jose (JAMsj) Public Programs, Contemporary Asian Theater Scene (CATS), and the Wesley Jazz Ensemble are joining forces again in 2015 to bring you a unique fundraiser exploring the wartime history of traditional Japanese performance arts. This

Shirley Kazuyo Muramoto-Wong 

fundraiser will feature a screening of the documentary, Hidden Legacy: Japanese Traditional Performing Arts in the World War II Internment Camps, and a Q&A session with the filmmaker Shirley Kazuyo Muramoto-Wong and

dancer Reiko Iwanaga. Guests will also be treated to a musical journey, from camp to contemporary jazz, by the Wesley Jazz Ensemble. NBC Bay Area reporter, Robert Handa, will be our emcee.

  

Read more... 

 

 

Cost: $20 donation ($15 for seniors) if purchased in advance from Nikkei Traditions, JAMsj, or CATS. $25 donation ($20 for seniors) if purchased at the door.
For more information, contact PublicPrograms@jamsj.org.  

 
Workshop
  
Water-based Japanese Woodblock Printmaking
with Charles Coates
 

  

Saturday, March 28, 2015
1:00 p.m.  

  

Japanese American Museum of San Jose
535 N. Fifth Street
San Jose, CA  95112

 

Charles Coates

Charles Woodruff Coates will hold a woodblock printmaking class at the Japanese American Museum of San Jose (JAMsj) on Saturday, March 28. In this workshop, students will create a fine-art print using woodcut printmaking techniques. Class participants will use Japanese approaches that are suitable to practice in the studio or home environment. Techniques include how to carve woodblocks using knives and gouges, then printing with watercolor pigment using traditional printing brushes. Class will consist of group demos and one-on-one instruction. All levels are welcome.

 

 

Seating limited to 12 participants (minimum 4 students).

Cost: Class fee (non-members, $50; members, $40; active volunteers, $20) and materials fee ($13), plus admission to the museum (nonmembers, $5; students and seniors over age 65, $3; JAMsj members and children under 12, free).  

Contact PublicPrograms@jamsj.org or call (408) 294-3138 to reserve a spot.  

  

Meet the Author:  Naomi Shibata
   
Bend with the Wind -- The Life, Family, and Writings
of Grace Eto Shibata
 

    

Saturday, April 4, 2015
1:00 p.m.  

  

Japanese American Museum of San Jose
535 N. Fifth Street
San Jose, CA  95112

 

The next meeting of the Japanese American Museum of San Jose's (JAMsj) book club will be a special one! Author Naomi Shibata will be joining us to discuss her book, Bend with the Wind-The Life, Family, and Writings of Grace Eto Shibata. This book tells the story of a family's belief in the American dream. Shibata recounts her mother's life and her family's history spanning 100 years.This family saga depicts her parents' immigration from Japan, their incarceration in WWII, and postwar settlement. Shibata shares the values that bound her family together and supported her throughout her life.

 

The book club meets at 1:00 p.m. the first Saturday of every other month at JAMsj. Meetings are open to the general public, and books are available for purchase at the museum store.
Questions? Contact Aggie Idemoto at (408) 294-3138 or at aggie@jamsj.org. 

 

 

Cost: Free with admission to the museum (non-members, $5; students and seniors over age 65, $3; JAMsj members and children under 12, free).

No RSVP required.

 
Partnerships
  
Traditions in Japanese Architecture 

  

Saturday, April 4, 2015
4:30 - 6:30 p.m.  

  

Japanese American Museum of San Jose
535 N. Fifth Street
San Jose, CA  95112

 

On Saturday, April 4, Karl Bareis of Santa Cruz Timberframes will speak on traditional Japanese building and architectural spaces. His talk will feature a PowerPoint presentation of his personal photography taken in Japan in the 1970s.

   

After completing a traditional carpenter's apprenticeship in Japan, Bareis returned in 1980 and built two structures. First he designed and built the tea rooms in the Lower House of Hakone Gardens in Saratoga. Then in 1994 he built the Daishu-in West Rinzai Zen Temple in Humboldt County (northern California). 

 
Nanzen-ji Temple 

Before the lecture, at 4:30 p.m., there will be a talk, as well as a tour, on the history and rebuilding of the Japanese American Museum of San Jose. Bareis' presentation will run from 5:00 to 6:30 p.m. 

 

The presentation is a fundraising event for the Japanese Cultural Fair in Santa Cruz, California, now in its twenty-ninth year. This year's fair will be held on Saturday, June 6, at Mission Plaza Park.

 

 
Seating is limited. Suggested Donation: $10 (general; seniors & students, $8). Proceeds will go to the Japanese Cultural Fair of Santa Cruz. Seating is limited.

Contact PublicPrograms@jamsj.org or call (408) 294-3138 to reserve a spot. 

 
JAMsj Blog
 
The Importance of Japanese American Traditions 
 by Susan Nakamura 
 

One of the goals of the Japanese American Museum of San Jose (JAMsj) is to preserve the unique history of our ancestors for future generations and to share their accomplishments and hardships with others. Japanese Americans can trace their roots to Japan. But their immigration to America, farming experience, and incarceration during World War II have combined to create Japanese American identity and culture.

 

As a young girl, I recall my mother pointing out my grandfather as an example of gaman: persevering through difficult times with hard work and without complaining. Through his example I should learn these virtues. Because my grandfather was born in Oahu, Hawaii, at that time a U.S. territory, he was a dual citizen of the United States and Japan. The family came stateside in 1906, the year of the San Francisco earthquake. They were forced to move every four years because the California Alien Land Law of 1913 prohibited Japanese from owning land or possessing leases for more than three years.

 

My grandmother was a picture bride from Kumamoto, a province on the island of Kyushu in Japan. Initially, my grandmother and her father were reluctant to have her travel to a 'foreign' country and unknown land. Her father later changed his mind. He told my grandmother that if she went to America and married my grandfather, they would   return to Japan in three years. As it turned out, they never returned to Japan.

 

Read more...

   

Calendar of Events


March 1, 2015:         Hinamatsuri
March 7, 2015:         Tohoku Update 2015 -- The Next Generation
March 7, 2015:         California Legacy Voice Network Teacher Workshop
March 9 -- 11, 2015: Jerome and Rohwer Interviews
March 14, 2015:       JA Women and Adventures in Identity
March 21, 2015:       Hidden Legacy + "Take the JA Train"
March 28, 2015:       Japanese Woodblock Printmaking
April 4, 2015:            Meet the Author:  Naomi Shibata
April 4, 2015:            Traditions in Japanese Architecture
April 3 -- 19, 2015:   Shining Wind:  40 Years of English Haiku
April 12, 2015:          Poetry Event
April 26, 2015:          Kodomo no Hi 
August 8, 2015:        California Legacy Voice Network Teacher Workshop
September 29, 2015: California Legacy Voice Network Teacher Workshop

For more information about our public programs, please contact PublicPrograms@JAMsj.org or call (408) 294-3138.

  JAMsj logo

Japanese American Museum of San Jose (JAMsj)
535 N. Fifth Street
San Jose, CA 95112
Tel: (408) 294-3138
Email: mail@jamsj.org
www.jamsj.org