JAMsj E-News
Japanese American Museum of San Jose
March 2014
In This Issue
Hinamatsuri at JAMsj
Japan's Migration Story
A New World: The Story of Japanese Migration
Executive Order 9066 -- Memories and Artifacts
Meet the Author -- Hiroshi Kashiwagi
Making a Difference: Japanese American Women
Book Club -- Heirlooms: Letters From A Peach Farmer
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Hina Matsuri at JAMsj

Hina Matsuri
(Japanese Doll Festival / Girls' Day) 
Hinamatsuri doll display.
Photo courtesy of May Matsuzaki.

 Sunday, March 2, 2014

11:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. 

 

Japanese American Museum of San Jose 
  535 N. Fifth Street
San Jose, CA  95112
 

The Japanese Doll Festival (Hina Matsuri), or Girls' Day, is a festival celebrated by families who have girls, wishing their daughters good health and growth. Traditionally, beautiful dolls representing the emperor, empress, attendants, and musicians were handcrafted especially for the occasion. The custom of displaying dolls began during the Heian period, when people believed the dolls possessed the power to contain bad spirits. 

Hinamatsuri activities.  Photo courtesy of May Matsuzaki.

 

Special guest Hina doll docent (Sunday only):  Isako Masanori Wasano, Director of the Northern California Shibu Mataro Miyabi Kai.

 

Come, bring your children to this special Girl's Day celebration at JAMsj. There will be traditional Hina Matsuri dolls, as well as more unique doll exhibits, and wonderful craft projects for both boys and girls.

 

Hina Matsuri dolls will be on display on Saturday and Sunday.

 

 

Cost: Entry is free with admission to the museum (non-members, $5; students and seniors over age 65, $3; JAMsj members and children under 12, free). An additional materials fee may apply.

  
Special Presentation
 
A New World:  Japan's Migration Story  

    

Saturday, March 8, 2014

7:00 p.m.    

  

*** Note: Venue has been changed to a nearby, larger location. Spots are now available. *** 

Wesley United Methodist Church 
566 N. Fifth Street 
San Jose, CA  95112
 
Shigeru Kojima 

Where are you from?  Where are you REALLY from?

 

This is a question that many people hate to hear, but this question will have a different meaning after the presentation by Shigeru Kojima on March 8 at 7:00 p.m. at the Japanese American Museum of San Jose (JAMsj).  Kojima has devoted many years of study to this topic and is the curator and a research fellow of the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) Yokohama Japanese Overseas Migration Museum (JOMM). The JOMM is the largest museum in Japan devoted to the study of Japanese overseas migration. 

Japanese Overseas Migration Museum. 
Photo used by permission of S. Kojima 
   
For hundreds of years, Japan's 'closed door' policy led to isolation. In fact, it was not until the 1880s that Japanese were even allowed to leave. Why were Japanese from areas such as Kumamoto, Yamaguchi, Fukuoka and Hiroshima among the largest groups that left Japan? 

 

Your appreciation of and curiosity about the Issei generation and other early pioneers will grow after learning how and why the first Japanese came to America through Kojima's research and exhibits at JOMM.

While there is no fee for this presentation, donations to JAMsj will be appreciated.

Please contact PublicPrograms@jamsj.org or call (408) 294-3138 to reserve a spot.
Note: Venue has been changed to a nearby, larger location. Spots are now available.
 
JAMsj Blog Article

A New World:  The Story of Japanese Migration   
 

By Pam Yoshida, co-owner of Nikkei Traditions 

 

An on-line order from Japan to Nikkei Traditions (NT) several years ago caught my attention. The customer, Shigeru Kojima, was the curator and researcher of the Japanese Overseas Migration Museum (JOMM) of Yokohama, Japan - the largest museum in  

Japan devoted to overseas migration. 

 

Japanese Overseas Migration Museum.
Photo used by permission of S. Kojima 

In 2013, I visited the JOMM with an armload of programs and posters from San Jose Japantown that illustrated the activities and vitality of one of the three remaining Japantowns left in the United States. This led to Kojima-san's interest in the history of San Jose's Japantown and will result in his research visit in March 2014. A week of interviews with Japantown merchants, walking tours through Japantown, visits to areas of significance to highlight the
contributions from the San Jose-Okayama sister city relationship as well as local Japanese contributions in the abalone industry in Monterey and the produce industry in Salinas are included in the visit.   

 

Read More on JAMsj's Blog... 

 
New Exhibit
  
Executive Order 9066:  Memories and Artifacts  

    

Friday, March 14, 2014

6:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.    

  

Japanese American Museum of San Jose  
  535 N. Fifth Street
San Jose, CA  95112
 
Display at San Jose ICA 
Photo courtesy of Glenn Tsutsumi 
In collaboration with the San Jose Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA), JAMsj will host "Executive Order 9066: Memories and Artifacts," an exhibit highlighting artifacts from our museum's permanent collection. This exhibit is part of a multi-venue presentation about the complex story of the Japanese American internment, which also includes The Tag Project (at SJ ICA) and Wendy Maruyama: Executive Order 9066 (at Art Object Gallery). 

JAMsj will also be hosting walking tours of Japantown San Jose in conjunction with this special collaboration. Walks will be offered to the public at 2:00 p.m. on March 29, April 19, and May 10. For more information on these and other walking tours available through JAMsj, contact info@JAMsj.org or call (408) 294-3138.
 
For more information on the multi-venue exhibits visit http://www.sjica.org
Book Signing
Starting from Loomis and Other Stories. 
Photo courtesy of Nichi Bei Foundation.

Meet the Author:  Hiroshi Kashiwagi 
author of Starting at Loomis
     

Saturday, March 15, 2014

1:00 p.m.      

  

Japanese American Museum of San Jose  
  535 N. Fifth Street
San Jose, CA  95112

 

Turning 90 for Hiroshi Kashiwagi simply marks his refinement as a writer/performer as he draws laughter; pauses for deep, knowing sighs; and coaxes tears from his audience when reading from his book, Starting From Loomis and Other Stories. Join Kashiwagi on March 15 at JAMsj as he recounts the arc of his life in his latest memoir of short stories and reflects on the moments, people, forces, mysteries, and choices that have made him who he is.

  

Hiroshi Kashiwagi at NBF Author Series. Photo courtesy of Nichi Bei Foundation. 

Central to this collection are his experiences as a Japanese American during World War II, including his imprisonment at Tule Lake, which led to the lifelong stigma of being labeled a "No-No Boy" after his years of incarceration. His nonlinear, multifaceted writing not only reflects the fragmentation of memory induced by the multiple traumas of racism, forced removal, and incarceration, but it also can be read as a bold personal response to the impossible conditions he and other Nisei faced throughout their lifetimes.

 

"It is in fact everything that Kashiwagi doesn't say, everything between the lines of his pen, everything hovering so delicately above the narrative, that is so heartbreaking and painful . . . These stories recuperate from erasure the history of Japanese American immigration and wartime detention, especially that of the Tule Lake incarceration, and the sensibilities and trauma of a Nisei whose long life, creative talents, and desire to write have allowed him to reflect on this past."-Karen Tei Yamashita, University of California, Santa Cruz

 

Recent Article:  "Author Hiroshi Kshiwagi:  From Togan Soup to Plums Can Wait and Beyond, the Life of an American" by Edward Yoshida, January 13, 2014, Discover Nikkei.

 

Hiroshi Kashiwagi is a Nisei writer, playwright, and actor, as well as the winner of the American Book Award in 2005 for Swimming in the American: A Memoir and Selected Writings.


Cost: Free with admission to the museum (nonmembers, $5; students and seniors over age 65, $3; JAMsj members and children under 12, free).


Contact PublicPrograms@jamsj.org or call (408) 294-3138 to reserve a spot.
Women's History Month

  Making a Difference:
Japanese American Women
 

    

Sunday, March 23, 2014

1:00 p.m. 

       

Japanese American Museum of San Jose  
  535 N. Fifth Street
San Jose, CA  95112
 

 To celebrate Women's History Month this year, the Japanese American Museum of San Jose (JAMsj) is proud to acknowledge the accomplishments and contributions of Japanese American women with a panel of distinguished women who are paving the way for future women leaders. The panel includes former Vice Chair of the Civil Liberties Public Education Fund, Susan Hayase, JAMsj President, Aggie Idemoto, Executive Director and Co-Founder of the Fred Koremtasu Institute, Karen Korematsu, South San Francisco Mayor, Karyl Matumoto, and Executive Director of West Valley Community Services, Naomi Nakano-Matsumoto. 

   

  Read more... 


 
Cost: Free with admission to the museum (nonmembers, $5; students and seniors over age 65, $3; JAMsj members and children under 12, free).

Contact PublicPrograms@jamsj.org or call (408) 294-3138 to reserve a spot.
Book Club

 Heirlooms:  Letters From A Peach Farmer 

 

Sunday, April 5, 2014

   1:00 p.m.      

 

Japanese American Museum of San Jose  
  535 N. Fifth Street
San Jose, CA  95112
 
Earthy wisdom and real-life stories emante from an award-winning author. As suburbs swallow more and more rich farmland and reforms change the farming industry, the voices of farmers have never been more important. In his latest collection of essays, David Mas Masumoto reminds us that food remains the cornerstone of our society, even in the twenty-first century. Pervading his essays is a rooted, proud sense of community, family, and craftsmanship, resulting in tales of toil and triumph over the land that produce the food for our grocery stores, farmers' markets, and restaurants. Written in the form of letters, Masumoto's essays achieve an intimacy uncommon in American literature. Told by a man leading the fabled simple life, this writing speaks eloquently of the need to protect the so-called bread and butter of life: food, family, and community.

 

The Book Club meets the first Saturday, every other month, and is open to the public.


  
Cost: Free with admission to the museum (nonmembers, $5; students and seniors over age 65, $3; JAMsj members and children under 12, free).

Questions? Contact Book Club facilitator, Aggie Idemoto at aggie@jamsj.org, or call JAMsj at (408) 294-3138.

Calendar of Events

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Japanese American Museum of San Jose (JAMsj)
535 N. Fifth Street
San Jose, CA 95112
Tel: (408) 294-3138
Email: mail@jamsj.org
www.jamsj.org