Fall 2013 Newsletter
In This Issue

Coming home: STEM and SEED alum returns to MIT to begin doctorate program in aerospace engineering


MOSTEC alum named a top high school graduate of 2013 by Business Insider


Photo gallery: MITES students showcase summer projects at the Final Presentations Symposium



Applications to SEED Academy now available
 
Saturday Enrichment Engineering and Discovery (SEED) Academy is a seven-semester academic enrichment and career exploration program at MIT for public high school students from Boston, Cambridge and Lawrence, Massachusetts. Applications are now available for high school freshmen and sophomores and are due Wednesday, November 8.
 


Give to OEOP
 
Without the generous support of friends of the office like you, we wouldn't be able to offer our programs free of charge to our incredible students. 
 



Dear friends,   

On the heels of a successful summer in which we served over 375 students from the Boston area and across the country, we have enthusiastically launched into our academic-year programming.

Saturday Engineering Enrichment and Discovery (SEED) Academy, our program for local high school students, began on Saturday, September 14 and will continue through May 2014. In February, we will welcome a new class of high school freshmen to the program along with some additional sophomores. For more details on the application process, please visit the SEED Academy application page.

The OEOP Middle School Mentoring Program began Saturday, October 5. This year, our mentors -- many of whom are undergrads from top area universities, including MIT -- will work with 57 students from Boston, Cambridge and Lawrence, Massachusetts, who participated in one of our summer programs. If you are interested in working with these students, please apply to be a mentor.

We are looking forward to a great rest of the fall semester with our outstanding students. Thank you for your continued support!

Sincerely,
Shawna Young
Executive Director
Office of Engineering Outreach Programs
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

 

Coming home: STEM and SEED alum returns to MIT to begin doctorate program in aerospace engineering
Hunter Zhao is a first-year doctoral student in
 the aerospace engineering program at MIT.
When Zi Peng "Hunter" Zhao was five years old, he knew what he wanted to be when he grew up: an aerospace engineer. "You see a rocket launch, and that to me was the coolest thing ever. You're sending people to space, and it's... discovery - exploration - it's just really awesome to me," he says. While the precise details of his dream have evolved over the years, his connection to MIT - beginning as a middle school student and extending through today as a first-year Ph.D. candidate in aerospace engineering - has remained constant.

While the doctorate program and research in MIT's Systems Engineering Advancement Research Initiative (SEAri) marks a new chapter for Hunter, returning to MIT is, in a way, a homecoming. Hunter arrived at the Institute around a decade ago as a rising seventh-grader who had only a few years before immigrated to Boston from Singapore after spending his early years in China.

In 2004, Hunter, then a seventh grader at Edwards Middle School in Boston, enrolled in the Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) Program in its inaugural year. In the program - provided by OEOP to students who attend public middle school in Boston, Cambridge and Lawrence, Massachusetts - Hunter and his peers spent five weeks during the summer learning math and science from MIT students and select Saturdays during the school year working one-on-one with student mentors. Hunter also participated in the Saturday Engineering Enrichment and Discovery (SEED) Academy, an OEOP program that provides hands-on curriculum to strengthen local high school students' foundational skills in math and science over seven semesters.

In 2010, Hunter returned to OEOP to serve as a teaching assistant for Minority Introduction to Engineering and Science (MITES).

MOSTEC alum named a top high school graduate of 2013 by Business Insider

Miguel Medrano (MOSTEC '12, MIT '17)
Miguel Medrano, a 2012 alum of the MIT Online Science, Technology, and Engineering Community (MOSTEC), was named one of "the 25 most impressive kids graduating from high school this year" by Business Insider earlier this year. In September, he began his freshman year at MIT, where he plans to study electrical engineering and computer science.

In his hometown of Fabens, Texas, Miguel is known for his remarkable math skills. As a high school junior in 2012, he placed first for calculator applications in the University Interscholastic League (UIL) State Academic Meet, a prestigious competition for top Texas high school students. In his senior year, Miguel placed fourth in calculator applications. This May, the El Paso Times highlighted his prodigious performance in the competition. Miguel has medaled 37 times in UIL math and science academic events.

Miguel began competing on the math team as a freshman, but he says his interest in math developed in the eighth grade. "I wasn't really that good at it," Miguel says. "And then in my eighth grade year, a new teacher came into our school. I liked his teaching style a lot."

Photo gallery: MITES students showcase summer projects at the Final Presentations Symposium

 
The 38th summer of the Minority Introduction to Engineering and Science (MITES) program came to a close with the Final Presentations Symposium on Friday, July 19. 79 rising high school seniors from 27 states and Puerto Rico participated in the six-week residential program and presented final projects in five fields: genomics, electronics, digital design, architecture, and engineering design.

During the program, participants took rigorous classes and participated in hands-on enrichment courses. Outside of the classroom, they visited MIT laboratories and engaged with MIT faculty and students, practicing scientists and engineers, and admissions officers. Since returning home, the students have begun the application process to top colleges and universities across the country.