The official newsletter for Coconino Community College

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In This Issue
Val Gleave honored
DGBs and Ariz. Legislators Meet
Ready for the Workforce
Constitution Day
Make a Difference
CCC Foundation Annual Meeting
CCC's Accounting Department Receives National Recognition
CCL Educators Roundtable
Life's a Ball
Auxiliary Services is Going Green
Hispanic Heritage Month
Leann Franklin
Este Pope
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EVENTS

Oct. 23 - CCC District Governing Board meeting

 

Oct. 23 - START Workshop: Choose your CCC major

 

Nov. 3 -  Life's a Ball 

DID YOU KNOW?

 

CCC serves nearly 10,000 learners annually.

 

CCC generates $7.13 for each taxpayer dollar invested.

 

Economic Impact - $85 million generated by CCC in one year.

 

Over $9 million in financial aid and scholarships is distributed to CCC students.

 

When the college was founded in 1991, CCC served only 1,000 learners. Today, the College serves nearly 10,000 learners a year!

 

80% of students surveyed say CCC met their individually defined educational goals.

 

 

Filling vital occupations - In Coconino County, CCC graduates make up:  

 

51% of the fire fighters  

 

22% of registered nurses and paramedics

 

43% of the detention officers

 

 

CCC tuition is less than one-third the cost of the average four-year state university.

 

 

CCC's tuition and fees are 88% of the same costs at community colleges nationally.

 



 

MISSION:

As a learning-centered college, we enrich lives by embracing diversity and transforming the future through quality education.


CORE VALUES:

People

Quality

Ethics

Community

Respect

Sustainability

Learning and Growth

 

DID YOU KNOW?

 

CCC serves nearly 10,000 learners annually.

 

CCC generates $7.13 for each taxpayer dollar invested.

 

Economic Impact - $85 million generated by CCC in one year.

 

Over $9 million in financial aid and scholarships is distributed to CCC students.

 

When the college was founded in 1991, CCC served only 1,000 learners. Today, the College serves nearly 10,000 learners a year!

 

80% of students surveyed say CCC met their individually defined educational goals.

 

 

Filling vital occupations - In Coconino County, CCC graduates make up:  

 

51% of the fire fighters  

 

22% of registered nurses and paramedics

 

43% of the detention officers

 

 

CCC tuition is less than one-third the cost of the average four-year state university.

 

 

CCC's tuition and fees are 88% of the same costs at community colleges nationally.

 



 

MISSION:

As a learning-centered college, we enrich lives by embracing diversity and transforming the future through quality education.


CORE VALUES:

People

Quality

Ethics

Community

Respect

Sustainability

Learning and Growth

 

DID YOU KNOW?

 

CCC serves nearly 10,000 learners annually.

 

CCC generates $7.13 for each taxpayer dollar invested.

 

Economic Impact - $85 million generated by CCC in one year.

 

Over $9 million in financial aid and scholarships is distributed to CCC students.

 

When the college was founded in 1991, CCC served only 1,000 learners. Today, the College serves nearly 10,000 learners a year!

 

80% of students surveyed say CCC met their individually defined educational goals.

 

 

Filling vital occupations - In Coconino County, CCC graduates make up:  

 

51% of the fire fighters  

 

22% of registered nurses and paramedics

 

43% of the detention officers

 

 

CCC tuition is less than one-third the cost of the average four-year state university.

 

 

CCC's tuition and fees are 88% of the same costs at community colleges nationally.

 



 

MISSION:

As a learning-centered college, we enrich lives by embracing diversity and transforming the future through quality education.


CORE VALUES:

People

Quality

Ethics

Community

Respect

Sustainability

Learning and Growth

 

DID YOU KNOW?

 

CCC serves nearly 10,000 learners annually.

 

CCC generates $7.13 for each taxpayer dollar invested.

 

Economic Impact - $85 million generated by CCC in one year.

 

Over $9 million in financial aid and scholarships is distributed to CCC students.

 

When the college was founded in 1991, CCC served only 1,000 learners. Today, the College serves nearly 10,000 learners a year!

 

80% of students surveyed say CCC met their individually defined educational goals.

 

 

Filling vital occupations - In Coconino County, CCC graduates make up:  

 

51% of the fire fighters  

 

22% of registered nurses and paramedics

 

43% of the detention officers

 

 

CCC tuition is less than one-third the cost of the average four-year state university.

 

 

CCC's tuition and fees are 88% of the same costs at community colleges nationally.

 



 

MISSION:

As a learning-centered college, we enrich lives by embracing diversity and transforming the future through quality education.


CORE VALUES:

People

Quality

Ethics

Community

Respect

Sustainability

Learning and Growth

 

DID YOU KNOW?

 

CCC serves nearly 10,000 learners annually.

 

CCC generates $7.13 for each taxpayer dollar invested.

 

Economic Impact - $85 million generated by CCC in one year.

 

Over $9 million in financial aid and scholarships is distributed to CCC students.

 

When the college was founded in 1991, CCC served only 1,000 learners. Today, the College serves nearly 10,000 learners a year!

 

80% of students surveyed say CCC met their individually defined educational goals.

 

 

Filling vital occupations - In Coconino County, CCC graduates make up:  

 

51% of the fire fighters  

 

22% of registered nurses and paramedics

 

43% of the detention officers

 

 

CCC tuition is less than one-third the cost of the average four-year state university.

 

 

CCC's tuition and fees are 88% of the same costs at community colleges nationally.

 



 

MISSION:

As a learning-centered college, we enrich lives by embracing diversity and transforming the future through quality education.


CORE VALUES:

People

Quality

Ethics

Community

Respect

Sustainability

Learning and Growth

 

DID YOU KNOW?

 

CCC serves nearly 10,000 learners annually.

 

CCC generates $7.13 for each taxpayer dollar invested.

 

Economic Impact - $85 million generated by CCC in one year.

 

Over $9 million in financial aid and scholarships is distributed to CCC students.

 

When the college was founded in 1991, CCC served only 1,000 learners. Today, the College serves nearly 10,000 learners a year!

 

80% of students surveyed say CCC met their individually defined educational goals.

 

 

Filling vital occupations - In Coconino County, CCC graduates make up:  

 

51% of the fire fighters  

 

22% of registered nurses and paramedics

 

43% of the detention officers

 

 

CCC tuition is less than one-third the cost of the average four-year state university.

 

 

CCC's tuition and fees are 88% of the same costs at community colleges nationally.

 



 

MISSION:

As a learning-centered college, we enrich lives by embracing diversity and transforming the future through quality education.


CORE VALUES:

People

Quality

Ethics

Community

Respect

Sustainability

Learning and Growth

 

Join Our Mailing List

October 2012  

Val Gleave honored
CCC Foundation Board member Mike Anderson, District Governing Board Chairman Patrick Hurley present retiring Governing Board member Val Gleave with a $2,500 check. Retiring Page campus Dean Lloyd Hammonds donated the money to the CCC Page campus in Gleave's name. Gleave was honored at the September Governing Board meeting in Page, AZ.
 
Lifelong Advocate of Higher Education to Retire from DGB 
 
PAGE, Ariz.  - Val Gleave was on the Page City Council when officials from Coconino Community College first came to a council meeting to ask about the city donating some land.

That donation of land is where CCC's Page campus now resides.  

"I was always a big supporter of the college," Gleave said recently. After she was off the city council, Gleave, a long-time resident of Page, decided to run for the CCC District Governing Board and won.

Sixteen years later, Gleave is retiring from the College's board at the end of the year. She was honored Sept. 25 at the District Governing Board's meeting in Page.

"As a board member, Val has been invaluable to CCC," said Patrick Hurley, the current CCC District Governing Board Chairman. "Her dedication to her community and CCC is unmatched. She is one of our strongest advocates for higher learning and accessible, affordable education."

The road to watching the college grow wasn't always easy. In November 1997, CCC held a bond election to build the Lone Tree campus and bring distance learning to the more remote parts of Coconino County, including finishing the Page campus. The controversial issue narrowly passed by 53 votes. A few months later, county residents tried to get several board members recalled, included Gleave.

"Two board members resigned, while three of us decided to stay and we were re-elected," Gleave said.

She was re-elected two additional times, starting in 2000, for a six-year term each time. Gleave said she's enjoyed watching the college and especially Page, grow into its own over the years.

"In Page, we're in such a remote area and a community college is the gateway to go on and get a four-year degree," Gleave said. "I attended community college before my bachelor's degree. I understood how important it is to have an affordable education option."

The Page campus has also served the business community, she said. Gleave and her husband recently sold their insurance company that they ran for almost three decades.

"For myself as a business person, I would go to the college to get additional skills for my employees," she said. Many times, she would call a professor and ask if he or she could recommend someone with certain skills.

"The College serves as a great opportunity to access people and help the community as a whole," she said.

Gleave was also on the board when the College hired its last two presidents, including current President Dr. Leah L. Bornstein.

"Watching Dr. Bornstein and her whole collaborative effort with Northern Arizona University has been great," she said. "I'm really proud to be part of watching that process take place."

Now with retirement, Gleave said she looks forward to handing over the reins on her board seat to Lloyd Hammonds, who retires as the Page campus dean in October.

"He is going to be a new board member as of Jan. 1," Gleave said. "He can walk in and understand the funding issues. It's going to be exciting to watch him. Page will be so well represented."
DGBs and Ariz. Legislators Meet
DGB meets with legislators
State Reps. Chester Crandall and Nancy McLain and Dale Frost from Gov. Jan Brewer's office were among those who attended a joint District Governing Board meeting with CCC and three additional community colleges on Oct. 5.  

Coconino Community College hosted a handful of community college district governing boards and three Arizona state legislators at the District Governing Boards/Legislator Summit, Oct. 5.

The joint meeting between Coconino, Mohave, Yavapai and Northland Pioneer community colleges with State Reps. Tom Chabin, Chester Crandall, Nancy McLain and Dale Frost from Gov. Jan Brewer's office was the third of its kind.

Governing board members and presidents from the four colleges reached out to the legislators to express the concerns of the Northern Arizona rural community colleges.

Chabin, who has been in office for five years, said he sensed the political flavor of the legislature would change in the upcoming session. But the legislators offered no clear hope that state funding for community colleges would change during the next legislative session scheduled to start in January.

State funding for community colleges has dwindled over the past decade. In 1999, state aid made up 44 percent of CCC's general operating budget. This year, it dropped to 11 percent.

All four presidents stressed how workforce development has become a priority to community colleges. Harold Harrington, a Yavapai district governing board member told the legislators that Arizona community college provide direct workforce training in many areas.

"Help us understand how to get that message to you," Harrington said.

Chabin said every community college in the Arizona was tremendously responsive to the needs of the current job market.

"You don't need our help to tell you what you need to do, what you need is our support," Chabin said.

CCC President Dr. Leah L. Bornstein pointed out that the mission of a community college is to be comprehensive, which includes educating those students who wish to transfer to a four-year university, provide workforce development within the community and develop corporate training for local industry.
Community and Corporate Learning Responds to County Workforce Readiness Needs with Manufacturing Training Program
CCC workforce readiness class  
Graduates of CCC's first Workforce Readiness cohort after receiving their Manufacturing Readiness certificates Oct. 5. 

The first cohort of Coconino Community College's manufacturing training program has graduated. CCC is the only community college in Arizona providing manufacturing training on the types of soft skills that employers in northern Arizona are saying applicants are lacking. 

Alex Wright, a coordinator in CCC's Community and Corporate Learning division, worked with local industry officials to create a course that people could take to learn those skills such as showing up on time and understanding needs for safety on the job.

"This program is looking to reduce the cost of turnover and reduce the cost of internal training by having laborers trained prior to entering the company," Wright said. "Not only can we help adults who are unemployed, we can help them with short-term job training to get help them get a livable wage job." 

CCC also got employers to commit to prioritizing applicants with this manufacturing job skills certificate. 

"When someone walks in to their HR office, they are prioritized in the employment process," Wright said.    
In 2010, the Northern Arizona Sustainable Economic Development Initiative, did a workforce development study that said northern Arizona employers were successful in finding high-end technical skilled laborers, but they were lacking in the entry-level positions. 

Fernando Brown, 26, said he took the class because he wants to find a "better job." He currently works in the food service industry, he said. 

"I'm looking to move into a company and have a career," Brown said after completing the course. 

Like most programs, Wright expects the program to take a few years to get off the ground. A combination of private industry donations and workforce innovation funding through the Department of Labor, helped pay for the program so it is free to participants. 

Wright is still looking for donations to expand the program to include a summer youth program that will bring students from Tuba City, Fredonia and the Grand Canyon to Flagstaff to learn about the industrial arts. 

"This is not just a monetary investment, but investment in the development of human capital in this rural community," Wright said. 
Constitution Day Celebration Makes Learning About the U.S. Constitution Fun

CCC's own Mitch Driebe channeled a Founding Father to help the College celebrate Constitution Day on Sept. 17.

Learn How Your Donation Makes a Difference in the Lives of Students
 
Everyone has causes that are close to their heart and we hope an affordable, high-quality education for the residents of Coconino County is close to yours.  Please consider adding the Coconino Community College Foundation to the list of organizations you give to every year.

The Coconino Community College Foundation Annual Fund Drive is underway.  And we're asking you to make a difference.  Together, we can make Coconino County a better place.

This Annual Fund Drive is a concentrated fundraising effort during a short period of time.  The Annual Fundraiser kickoff was Sept. 14 at the CCC Foundation Annual Meeting.  It will run through the end of October, with several activities planned including: a mailing to past Foundation donors, a focus on employee giving and distributing information about the CCC Foundation.

We hope you can join us Oct. 16 at the Lone Tree campus boardroom for an employee giving kickoff luncheon providing free lunch and a gift for everybody who attends! You don't have to be a donor to attend. Learn about the CCC Foundation and what it does to support the College.  Every gift is important.  Your gift matters, any amount, any time.

In a few weeks, we'll host a Thank You Celebration event, where we will invite all employees who give throughout the year through payroll deduction or have given a one-time substantial gift.  Those who give will be entered to win some amazing prizes, including a trip to Las Vegas!  

We know that everyone has different financial means and personal reasons for giving.  No amount is too small to symbolize the support that CCC employees have for this institution.  You can join efforts such as building the Presidents' CCC2NAU Scholarship endowment, give to the greatest needs of the College, or even channel your money to build student success through specific projects.

For more information contact Scott Talboom at scott.talboom@coconino.edu or Kristina Wyse at kristina.wyse@coconino.edu. 
CCC Foundation Annual Meeting

Patrick Harrison CCC2NAU recipient


CCC student Patrick Harrison is the first recipient of the CCC2NAU Presidents' Scholarship. CCC President Dr. Leah L. Bornstein, her husband Joseph Findley and Northern Arizona University President Dr. John Haeger and his wife Cecily endowed the scholarship to benefit CCC students enrolled in the CCC2NAU program. Each family pledged $20,000.  Pictured from left, Joseph Findley, Dr. Leah L. Bornstein. Patrick Harrison, Cecily Haeger and Dr. John Haeger at the 2012 CCC Foundation Annual Meeting.
CCC's Accounting Department Receives National Recognition
 
Coconino Community College's Business and Administrative Services Department has been awarded the Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting by the Government Finance Officers Association of the United States and Canada.

CCC received the award for its comprehensive recognition in the area of governmental accounting and financial reporting. Its attainment represents a significant accomplishment by a government and its management. This is the 14th year in a row that CCC has received this award.

This report was judged by an impartial panel to meet the high standards of the program including demonstrating a constructive "spirit of full disclosure" to clearly communicate its financial story and motivate potential users and users groups to read the report.

The GFOA is a non-profit professional association serving approximately 17,500 government finance professionals with offices in Chicago and Washington, D.C. 
CCL Educators Roundtable Sharing Workforce Development Ideas and Strategies
CCC Educators Roundtable mtg
Royce Kincanon, Business/Industry Coordinator at Northland Pioneer College speaks at the Workforce Development Educator Roundtable Oct. 3 as Ginger Johnson of Yavapai Community College and CCC's Alex Wright listen. 
 
 
Community colleges representatives from all over Arizona gathered last week at Coconino Community College to share ideas about workforce development. John Cardani, Pat Nelson and Alex Wright, all from CCC's Community and Corporate Learning hosted the roundtable Oct. 3.

The colleges in attendance were Yavapai, Mesa, Gila, Cochise, Mohave community colleges and Northland Pioneer College.  Many of the representatives spoke of the different ways workforce development is implemented across different counties and of successful programs, such as CCC's pre-job training program for manufacturing jobs, which just say its first cohort graduate last week. 

Life's a Ball at the Page Balloon Regatta
  
This year's Annual Page Balloon Regatta is fast approaching! If you are planning to attend, book your hotel now! And while there, keep your eyes out for the Coconino Community College balloon!

The regatta is Nov. 3-4. If you would like more information about the Annual Page Balloon Regatta or hotels in Page, check out the link below. There is also a great video that illustrates the atmosphere perfectly.

http://visitpagearizona.com/balloon-regatta-2011.html

This event runs concurrently with the Life's a Ball event benefiting the CCC Page Campus. Tickets are on sale now!

To purchase tickets please go to the Foundation Offices on the Lone Tree Campus or call the Page/ Lake Powell Campus at 928-645-3987.

Ball prices are-
1 ball- $10
3 balls - $25
14 balls - $100
 
This year's prize list includes:
Grand Prize - $1,000
5-Day 70-foot houseboat rental
7-day Grand Canyon trip for two
HDTV Flat Screen Television
$500 cash 
 
 
Buy your tickets early. You never know, it could be the grand prize winner!

Ruth Foster Named Full-time Faculty of the Year
Ruth Foster

Ruth Foster was a journalist for more than a dozen years, when she realized she enjoyed teaching more than she enjoyed writing. Foster was getting a master's degree in English and working as a teaching assistant when she decided that she wanted to pursue teaching.

 

Foster, who teaches developmental reading at Coconino Community College, was named full-time faculty of the year for 2012. Students nominate instructors for the honor.

 

"I really like helping students be successful," Foster said. "It comes naturally and fits along with my journalism background."

 

Foster joined CCC as a part-time instructor in 1993 and became a full-time instructor five years later. Foster has taught everything from creative writing to reading. Her students in her developmental reading classes vary widely, but a majority of them are right out of high school.

 

"We work so hard to come up with projects where students are successful," Foster said. "My classes are brain-based."

 

She works with her students to understand how their brains work and what happens to the brain when they learn a certain way.

 

"They literally see how their brains process information," said Foster, who is a certified reading specialist and has 30 postgraduate hours in curriculum development.

 

Over the years, Foster helped spearhead changes in the department that has led to more student success. Part of that is helping students see the organizational patterns in textbooks and learn how to take a textbook and break it down into parts.

 

"Students who succeed in these classes are highly likely to succeed in their general education courses, also," Foster said.

 

Ultimately, it's the students who encourage her love of teaching.

 

"They're so much fun and they ask really good questions," Foster said.

 

Nomination forms for this year's faculty of the year are available at: nomination forms.

 

Stay tuned next month when we feature, Benning Tieke, this year's part-time faculty of the year.  

 

CCC Festival of Science Events Focus on STEM Skills
STEM City Celebration 10.3.12
Coconino High School physics teacher Christine Sapio talks to visitors about school's robotics team, CocoNuts at the at CCC's STEM City Celebration Sept. 26. It was one of several events the College during Flagstaff Festival of Science week.

For the third year in a row, Coconino Community College participated in the Flagstaff Festival of Science. CCC kicked off its events with a table at Science in Park. Later in the week, CCC hosted a Celebration of a STEM City  where local science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) students, teachers even Coconino High School's robotics team and robot were on hand. CCC's Bryan Bates served as president the Flagstaff Festival of Science and Flagstaff Mayor Jerry Nabours declared Sept. 26 as Flagstaff STEM City Day. CCC ended the week of science with its own Celebration of Science night where instructors opened their labs at the Lone Tree campus.
Auxiliary Services is Going Green
 
Auxiliary Services is going green. You'll now find there is a place to recycle batteries, boxes and toner cartridges. Order forms are much simpler and printed on recycled paper.

These were part of the changes employees learned about at the Auxiliary Services Fall Open House on Sept. 20. A total of 72 attendees snacked on a diverse bounty of breakfast and lunch goodies throughout the day.  Tours of duplicating as well as shipping and receiving were a great learning experience and every person who came said they learned something new. Several people walked through the office supply "store" to see what items were on hand and discovered how the ordering process worked.

For those who didn't have a chance to attend the Open House, feel free to stop by any time and Connie or Dusty will be happy to answer any questions, give you a tour, and show you all the new exciting changes taking place.

Remember you can order supplies on the intranet by using the link below:

Ordering supplies

Please note, send all orders to: duplicatingservices@coconino.edu to ensure fastest delivery.
CCC Celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month

Hispanic Heritage Month

CCC celebrated Hispanic Heritage Month Sept. 26 with Café y Pan at the Student Center on the Lone Tree campus. Traditional Mexican pastries and coffee were enjoyed by everyone who stopped by. Hispanic Heritage Month goes on through Oct. 15. 

HR Corner  

Leann Franklin Joins the Enrollment Services Team
 
Leann Franklin joined Coconino Community College as an Enrollment Services Generalist. This position involves interacting with students and faculty, and Franklin said this is her favorite part of working here.

"The people here are so friendly and everyone is willing to help," she said.

Franklin is from the Memphis area and attended West Memphis Sr. High School. For the last 12 years, she has lived in Byhalia, Mississippi. Franklin has 26 years of work experience with the federal government, and she has held several office assistant and secretarial positions.

In her spare time, Franklin enjoys reading and spending time with her five grandchildren. She enjoys grooming her horses and watching her husband work with them.
Este Pope to Use Her Love of Technology and Skills to Enhance
eLearning at CCC
 
Este Pope moved over from the library side to become Coconino Community College's eLearning Coordinator. Pope works closely with students, and saysthis as her favorite part of working here.

"I love the opportunity to make an impact on our community," she said.

Born in Texas, Pope made her home in various cities on the East coast before moving to Flagstaff in 2010. She attended high school in Groton, CT and received her Bachelor of Arts the University of Connecticut. She later received a master's in Theology/Biblical Studies from Boston College and a Master of Library and Information Science from Simmons College in Boston.

Before her new position, Pope worked as a librarian at CCC, Southern Connecticut State University, Yale University, and Boston College. She enjoys all types of crafts-sewing, knitting, and painting. She also enjoys creative writing and hiking on the weekends with her spouse and her three children.

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