Tuesday June 16th, 2015
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Human
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Ethiopian-Jews-in-Israel
Many historians are convinced that Ethiopian Jews are medieval converts from Christianity. But mounting genetic evidence, and new scholarly research, suggests the Jewish origins of the Beta Israel, who today live mostly in Israel, pre-dates Ashkenazi European Jewry.
Food & Agriculture
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When discussing GMOs, many arguments are put forth on why they are “bad” and should be avoided. A molecular geneticist examines nine popular claims and finds they don't have much to do with genetic modification.
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Grandmothers played an important role in the evolution of human social relationships, generational knowledge sinks and even brain size. Now women of a certain age are storming politics as well.
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The global reach of the web has allowed people to find others who look like an identical twin, yet share almost no familial DNA. What's the science behind this remarkable phenomenon?
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Scientifically, it’s called ectogenesis, a term coined by J.B.S. Haldane in 1924. The technology is on its way. How will that impact our views of birth, abortion and gay reproduction?
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The public brouhaha over the first GM animal designed for human consumption--the AquaBounty salmon-- has thrown a cloud over the entire enterprise of developing GM animals. Under the radar, GM animals are being developed, and human health can benefit from it.
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Only three years ago, scientists from the United States and Sweden invented a technology that is literally upending our view of biotechnology. It's revolutionary, and so efficient that it poses unique practical, regulatory and ethical challenges.
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Conventional farmers, especially those who grow genetically modified crops, are often accused of "dousing" or "drowning" their fields in chemical pesticides. Here's a reality check.
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Food contamination outbreaks could be better tracked with a new technology: spraying DNA barcodes directly onto food. It could also help trace whether a food contains GMOs. But as in the debate over GMOs, it's mired in controversy.
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Newer precision genetic engineering techniques could bring back beneficial genes from wild relatives of crops without using foreign genes. Although the concept is attractive to organic supporters, their ideological opposition to genetic engineering is likely to block its embrace.
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BBC's takedown of activist environmentalists for their rejection of safe and environmentally sustainable crops is the latest in a series of setbacks in the mainstream media for what is increasingly being seen as an anti-science position.
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Logical, science-based arguments often seem to have no affect on people hardened in their opposition to GMOs. The reasons are grounded in our emotions, and don't think that anti-GMO NGOs don't know that, and exploit it in their messaging.

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