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NOVEMBER 2012
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NOVEMBER 2012 NEWSLETTER

 

     Things to remember to do in November:

 

* Winterize your sprinkler system.

* Turn water off at hose faucets; drain and store hoses.

* Move freezable liquids indoors, such as pool supplies,

  cleaners, bug sprays,  etc.  Be sure to store them in a safe

  location away from food and children. 

* Cut perennials and roses back, mulch roses with straw or

  leaves.

* Cut back ornamental grasses.

* Plant spring bulbs now (tulips, daffodils, crocus, etc)

* Install markers or stakes along lawns, curbs, plants, sprinkler heads, etc. to

  provide a visual structure to help prevent damage from snow plows and snow

  removal services.

* Add gas stabilizer to your power equipment before storing for winter.

* Keep a ice scraper and snow brush in your vehicle.

* Keep lock de-icer handy in the event of frozen locks.  Spray WD-40 or similar

  lubricant in locks to help prevent freezing problems.

 
LAWNS

 

MOWING AND MAINTENANCE 

 

Final mowing of turf at 2 to 2 1/2" will allow debris to blow off and avoid matting of long grass blades over the winter, as well as reduce the risk of snow mold disease.  Be sure to remove leaves and debris.  If temperatures remain warm, additional mowing may be needed.

 

 

FERTILIZER

 

  Apply fertilizer through late November.  Most lawn fertilizer programs are designed to apply a certain total amount of Nitrogen per year.  This feeding will promote stronger, deeper roots.

 

   

SPRINKLERS - Be sure your sprinkler system has been winterized!

 

     We also recommend unplugging your controller for the winter.  This will help reduce any risk of power surges to the controller during power interruptions.  Also, turn off water to outdoor faucets; drain and store garden hoses. 

 

  
 
  
SHRUBS AND TREES
   
  Now is the time to finalize any trimming of shrubs, as well as pruning trees.  If large trees require pruning requiring equipment to drive on your lawn, it might be a good idea to wait until the ground is frozen to avoid possible damage.  It is acceptable to prune trees throughout the entire winter.
 
 
PRUNING AND CARING FOR HYDRANGEA
 
      Hydrangea pruning can be very intimidating.  There are four types of hydrangea.  The most common is the "macrophylla" or "big leaf" hydrangea.  This variety, which includes the "Endless Summer", produces flower on both old and new wood.  Pruning old wood now will reduce the potential flower next season, which is not recommended.  If pruning, it is recommended to prune from the new growth, as well as pruning out any dead stems.  If, however, dramatic pruning is needed to control the size, flowering would only be affected for one season.  Pruning off old flower heads can be done either in the fall or spring.
     The next, most common variety is the "paniculata", which blooms later in the season.  Some common hydrangea within this family are the "Limelight" and "PeeGee".  This variety can be determined by the shape of the flower being more elongated instead of rounded.  This variety produces flower on the new stems only.  Therefore, pruning and shaping can be done in late fall or early spring without affecting new flower.
     The "Oakleaf" hydrangea can only tolerate very little pruning without affecting the new flower.  Only prune to remove buds after flowering is complete.
     "Smooth" hydrangea or "Anabelle" have hardy roots and very delicate stems and foliage.  This variety should be cut down to 6-12" in the fall.  This cutting back will encourage flowering next season.
     In summary, the worst case scenario, if you are not sure, or have to cut your hydrangea back, is that flowering for only one season will be affected.

 

 (You-Tube Hydrangea pruning video)  

 

 

WINTER KILL PROTECTION SPRAY
     
     This important spray application, also referred to as "ANTI-DESICCANT SPRAY", will help safeguard plants from "winter kill".  When plants lose moisture through their foliage during warm sunny winter days, and the ground is frozen, there is no available moisture to re-supply the plant through the roots.  This loss of moisture and drying out is the underlying cause of "winter kill" injury.  If the plant is deprived long enough, it will die.  The protection spray coats the foliage and stems with a wax like coating to seal in the moisture and preserve the plant.  This low cost protection usually costs less than replacing one shrub!  To safeguard your landscape, consider ordering a professional application this fall and early winter.
    
 
 
 NOVEMBER'S RECIPE ...
  
BROCCOLI CHEESE BAKE
 
1 CAN CREAM OF CHICKEN SOUP
1/2 CUP WATER
1/4 CUP CHOPPED ONION
1 TSP. SALT
1/2 TSP. POULTRY SEASONING
1/8 TSP. PEPPER
1 PACKAGE(10 OZ) FROZEN CHOPPED BROCCOLI, THAWED
6 CUPS ENRICHED DRIED BREAD CUBES (ABOUT 8 SLICES)
4 SLICES AMERICAN CHEESE
 
COMBINE SOUP, WATER, ONION AND SEASONINGS. STIR IN BROCCOLI. FOLD IN BREAD CUBES. POUR MIXTURE INTO GREASED 2 QUART SQUARE BAKING DISH. TOP WITH CHEESE.
BAKE IN PREHEATED 350 DEGREE OVEN FOR 25 TO 30 MINUTES.

 

We have now added an archive feature on our website to view all previous month's newsletters, or to share with your friends, neighbors and family.  To locate these newsletters, click on our website link (www.ghlandscaping.com), then click on the button below "VIEW OUR NEWSLETTER" on our home page.  Also, I invite you to share any tips, hints, information or recipes with us.  Please email me your input ([email protected]).
 
I would like to take this opportunity to wish everyone a "VERY HAPPY THANKSGIVING!
  Sincerely,
Gary L. Courchesne
G & H Landscaping, Inc.
Copyright 2012. G & H Landscaping, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
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