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September, 2014
College Terrace Tree Walk
Education Training
AmazonSmile
Palo Alto Parks Master Plan
Celebrating the life of Bob Schauer
Planting Leader Training
Fall Planting and Tree Care
Transported to Yosemite
Local trees need water
Signs of drought stress
 
More Tre-E-vents
Saturday, September 13th
10am - 12pm
California Coast Live Oak
Take a stroll with Canopy and ISA certified arborist Jeff Newborn to explore the trees of College Terrace.

We'll discuss the rare and lovely Purple Birch, the fast-growing Douglas Fir, the classic Coast Live Oak, Western Catalpa, Japanese Flowering Crabapple, and many more.
 
Meet at the corner of College Avenue and Oberlin Street.
RSVP online or just show up!
Environmental Educator Training - Nov. 4th & 6th
Are you passionate about trees, the environment, and education? Do you enjoy working with children and youth? We would love to have you join Canopy's team of volunteer Environmental Educators!

Part 1: Tue. Nov. 4th, 4-6pm
Part 2: Thurs. Nov. 6th, 4-6pm

This free two-part training covers teaching methodology, cultural sensitivity, and three of Canopy's education units.

Help us inspire the next generation of environmental stewards. Learn more....
New way to support Canopy
Support Canopy while you shop with AmazonSmille

Shopping on Amazon? Shop through AmazonSmile and support Canopy!

Here's how it works:

Go to smile.amazon.com on your web browser or mobile device and choose Canopy as your charity.The products and prices are identical to Amazon Prime, but Amazon donates 0.5% of the proceeds to Canopy. It may not sound like a lot, but it can add up!

Use this link to visit AmazonSmile and support Canopy while you shop. Thank you!

Community news
Call for Input: Palo Alto Parks Master Plan

Palo Alto parks

The City of Palo Alto is working on a new Parks Master Plan. They want your input! Get involved and give your feedback on the Parks Master Plan website. 

Community Resources
Arborist List Link
Tree Library link
Tree Care Link
 
Celebrating the Life of Robert Schauer

Bob and Kay Schauer have been faithful friends and volunteers with Canopy for over ten years.

Bob and Kay SchauerBob passed away on August 16th, 2014.

Canopy remembers Bob as a cheerful, dedicated, and energetic volunteer and donor.

Each summer you could count on Bob to don his Young Tree Care Survey gear and complete five or six survey routes - and at least one book on tape in the process. We'll miss you, Bob!

Read a lovely obituary for Bob published in the Mercury News.

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2014 Planting Leader Training
Last Chance to sign up!
Join our Team
Would you like to volunteer outside, meet neighbors, and make a visible difference in your community?

Part 1: September 4th or 5th (choose one), 6:30 - 8:30pm
Part 2: September 6th, 9am - 12pm
 
This free two-part training will equip you to lead other volunteers during community tree planting events in schools, parks, and neighborhoods throughout Palo Alto, East Palo Alto, and nearby communities.

Part one offered Thursday and Friday (choose one date) includes an introduction to trees, proper tree-planting techniques, and best practices in young tree care. Part two allows participants to put their new skills to work by planting new trees in a Palo Alto park.

More ways to volunteer:

Fall Planting and Tree Care

Volunteer Banner

September marks the beginning of the planting season for Canopy! We invite you to join us as we plant new trees and care for hundreds of existing trees.

 

Join our upcoming volunteer events:

  • September Tree Care Work Day
    Saturday, September 20th, 9am - 12pm
    Brentwood Elementary School
  • DriWater Refill and Tree Care
    Wednesday, September 24th, 3:30 - 5pm
    Cesar Chavez Academy
  • October Tree Care Work Day
    Saturday, October 11th, 9am - 12pm
    Location TBD
  • College Terrace Tree Planting
    Saturday, October 25th, 9am - 12pm
    College Terrace Neighborhood

Sign-up online or email [email protected]

We'll add more planting dates soon, so be sure to check our calendar to see what's coming up!


Transported to Yosemite
An August evening with Yosemite National Park Ranger Bob Roney

Imagine evening bird calls, a crackling campfire, the arching boughs of oak and pine trees overhead, and--of course!--an expert storyteller weaving tales of great forests with words, sounds, and gestures.

Ranger Bob by the campfire

This was the experience Canopy and friends shared with Yosemite Park Ranger and Master Naturalist Bob Roney at the Lucie Stern Boy Scout Fire Circle a few weeks ago.

"When I first set eyes on Yosemite," Bob told us, "it was like coming home." Bob shared vivid tales of his years in Yosemite, interpreting a landscape full of knobcone pines (they need fire to reproduce!), hardy white bark pine, and the most massive of tree species, the majestic Giant Sequoia.

Afterwards, we gathered around the fire embers for marshmallow-roasting and that beloved campfire tradition -- s'mores!

Canopy is incredibly grateful to Bob Roney for sharing his stories, to the Boy Scouts for lending their Fire Circle, to the volunteers that helped with the event, and to all of the friends and neighbors who joined us for this special evening. See photos of the event here.

Drought-stressed trees and how to protect them

Each summer Canopy completes a survey of Palo Alto's youngest urban trees. We're still gathering results from this year, but one trend is clear: local trees are thirsty!

 

Unusual high mortality observed among City trees this year

 

Probing moisture on young street tree Thirsty trees may not be a surprise in a drought, but the lack of water is the number one cause of mortality in young urban trees. It's critical that we protect our urban forest and preserve the many benefits it provides by helping our trees through this dry spell.

 

Young trees are not the only ones hurting from lack of water. Palo Alto Urban Forester Walter Passmore observes, "We've been removing more dead trees than usual this summer. The increase mortality can be attributed to the drought."

What's really going on inside these drought-stressed trees?

We all know trees need water, but what happens when they don't get enough? Learning to recognize early signs of stress and understanding the biology of our trees can help us better protect and manage them.

Water drives all of a tree's essential functions, from photosynthesis in the leaves to nutrient uptake in the roots. When trees lack water, it impacts every element of their health and growth. A healthy tree can recover from a short dry spell, but prolonged drought conditions can cause permanent, long-term damage or death.
Drought stress Early signs of damage can include wilting, yellowing, or scorched leaves. If water stress continues, the trees ability to fend off disease and pests becomes impaired.

What can you do to protect your trees?
  • Is Your Tree thirsty? Check on your young and mature trees to ensure they get sufficient water to make it through the drought. Check out Canopy's online resources about trees and water for guidance.
  • Deep water your trees for more impact with less water. In dry summer months, young trees need about 15 gallons of water each week -- less than the average load of laundry. Mature trees need more water, but less often.
  • Save water indoors and on other parts of the landscape, and consider reusing indoor water for your garden. Visit save20gallons.org for tips and ideas.
  • Consider removing your lawn or cutting the irrigation, but be sure nearby trees have sufficient water; they most likely have been tapping into "extra" water from the lawn irrigation.
Read more:
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Canopy is a nonprofit environmental organization that plants and protects trees in Palo Alto, East Palo Alto, and neighboring communities. Thank you for helping us create a continuous, sustainable, and thriving urban forest that can be enjoyed today and by future generations.