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In This Issue
Dr. Ji Hyang Padma
Yoga Workshop
Faculty Research Symposium
CIHS Faculty Achievement
CIHS Student Achievement
Dr. Motoyama's New Publication
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May/2016

Dear CIHS Community Members,

The weather has changed in Southern California, and it seems that June Gloom has already started. Our May newsletter has several articles. First, Dr. Hope Umansky introduces our Summer Quarter schedule, which includes our CIHS' Annual Conference 2016, "Faculty Research Symposium: Subtle Energy & Integral Sciences," which takes place on our beautiful campus, Saturday, July 9 & 10, from 8:30am am to 6 pm. This conference is open to the public. Please see our website for detail here. The titles for each Faculty Research Conference are now posted on the website. It will be an exciting conference. For CIHS students, Registration week for Summer quarter classes is June 20-24. The Faculty Research Symposium must be registered for during this week if you want to receive academic credit for it. No exceptions.
 
The second article is a review of our annual yoga workshop with Mr. Takeshima and Paul & Suzee Grilley, which was held on the weekend of April 23 & 24. The focus of the yoga workshop this year was on the sahasrara (crown) chakra.
 
In the following two articles, we have information announcing the achievements of CIHS faculty, Dr. Sharon Mijares, and CIHS student, Steven Blonder. Those faculty and student academic achievements are very exciting CIHS community development.
 
If you are interested in CIHS or have questions about any of our programs, please visit our website (www.cihs.edu) or directly contact Dr. Hope Umansky (hope_umansky@cihs.edu ) for any assistance. If you are local and would like to visit our campus and discuss our exciting and unique graduate programs and research opportunities in person, we will be happy to schedule a time. Many of our classes can be taken as an audit course if you are interested in seeing what CIHS classes are like or are passionate about a particular topic. Please do not hesitate to ask us about this process. We welcome all like-minded inquires.
 
 
Sincerely,
 
 
Hideki Baba, Ph.D. 
 Hideki_Baba@cihs.edu
 
Message from the Dean 
 

Hello CIHS Community,

Spring has sprung! We are very busy preparing for CIHS' Faculty Research Symposium for our summer 2016 Subtle Energy Conference, July 9 and July 10. I hope you will join us to see the incredible research our faculty conduct. Each lecture will be combined with 30 minutes of interfacing that includes experiential exercises and Q and A. If you are interested in seeing the work CIHS faculty are currently doing in the industries represented by our programs, please join us. The price for Community Members to attend is $340 by June 27 and $410 after June 27. Students register for either two or four units of academic credit, depending on the level of engagement in which they choose to participate.
 
Lunch options can be purchased on campus Saturday and Sunday, and there will be a social hour with light appetizers celebrating the end of the conference on Sunday from 545 pm to 645 pm. It will be an informal, fun, and exciting day to experience CIHS' research pioneers who teach CIHS exciting courses.
 
To note, this summer will be offering one of our most popular lab classes: Subtle Energy Devices and Research taught by Dr. Gaetan Chevalier. It will include work on several of our subtle energy detection/measuring devices. This course must have five local students for it to run. It is also open to CIHS community members to audit.
 
As always, every quarter CIHS regular core and program requirements are offered. Hybrid on campus/online classes are available to distance students as an Integrated Learning Modality (ILM). In general, all courses are open as intra or interdisciplinary electives, as long as you confirm there is room in your program or you are passionate enough to take an extra elective. It is important to be thoughtful about this. No knowledge is wasted knowledge when it can all be applied to your conceptual and foundational academic and applied professional skills, but check your transcript carefully so there are no surprises. Integrated Learning Modality (ILM) means there will be on campus and online components of the class. Distance students are welcome for all but the lab course and Faculty Research Symposium. If a class is solely on campus for residential students, it will say so.
 
The Summer Quarter 2015 Courses are as follows:
 
Spring quarter ends June 10, 2016. Summer quarter begins July 4. Registration for Summer quarter courses is June 20-24.
 
Human Sexuality I: Clinical Considerations, Dr. Michelle Dexter. Clinical Psychology licensure requirement & Integral Psychology core requirement. Open to all other programs. ILM.
Biological Basis for Neuropsychology/ Neuroscience and Spirituality, Dr. Sam Aganov. Clinical Psychology Licensure Recommended course. Open to all other programs as an elective. Online.
Human Development and Archetypes, Dr. Tamara Goldsby. Clinical & Integral Psychology Program Requirement, open to all other programs as an elective. ILM.
Ecopsychology, Dr. Sharon Mijares. Psychology elective, open to all other programs as an elective. Online.
Psychology of Shamanism, Dr. Roger Cavnaugh. Psychology elective, open to all other programs as an elective. ILM.
Study of East/West: Metaphysics and Healing, Dr. Mali Burgess. CRP core requirement, open to all other programs as an elective. Online.
Subtle Energy Devices and Research, Dr. Gaetan Chevalier. Fulfills the lab requirement for Integral Health biophysics concentration students. Open to all other programs as an electives. On Campus only.
Biophysics: Basic Notions and Quantum Entanglement, Dr. Nandini Katre. Open to all programs as en elective. ILM. Open to distance students through Skyping.
Hinduism, Dr. Ji Hyang Padma. CRP program, open to all programs as an elective, except clinical psychology. Online.
Research Methods for Religious Studies, Dr. Randy Fauver. CRP core requirement. Open to all other MA and PhD programs as an elective, except for psychology. Online.
TOS: Subtle Energy and Integral Sciences Conference: Faculty Research Symposium, Saturday, July 9, 830-530 and Sunday, July 10, 830-545. : Offered as two or four units. Elective open to all programs. Must be registered for during registration week if you would like academic credit for it, no exceptions. Students must attend the entire conference for credit and there will be research papers as determined by the number of units for which you register and per degree program. On Campus. Facilitated by Dr. Thomas Brophy.
 
At the end of every quarter, Dr. Baba sends an updated transcript to you so you can ensure you are taking what you need to fulfill your program and course requirements. Please compare it to the program requirements in the catalog. The catalog that was published when you enrolled contains the requirements for your program. As you know, program requirements can be dynamic so if you are looking at the 2016 catalog but enrolled in 2013 you may be confused. Ultimately, keeping track of where you are in your program to ensure you have taken what is required is up to you. However, I am here for course advisement (psychology and/or other programs as a whole) as is Dr. Thomas Brophy (Thomas_Brophy@cihs.edu), Integral Health Psychology Program Director and Executive Dean. We are here to help guide your academic path. Thus, although it is ultimately your responsibility to take what you need within your program, we are here to answer questions and point you in the right direction. If you are in need of course advisement, please contact us. I am happy to set aside time to meet in person, converse via email or speak by phone. I look forward to hearing from you and seeing you at Faculty Research Symposium, July 9 and 10.
 
Happy Spring!
 
Sincerely,

Hope Umansky, PhD





CIHS Annual Yoga Workshop Review

 

CIHS' Annual Yoga Workshop, during the weekend of April 23 and 24, with Master Teachers, Mr. Takeshima and Paul & Suzee Grilley, was very successful. This year, the focused chakra was the Sahasrāra chakra (generally considered the seventh primary chakra, according to most tantric yoga traditions, and also known as the "crown" chakra.) Mr. Takeshima, a disciple of Dr. Hiroshi Motoyama and an advanced meditation instructor from Japan, led the class introducing exercises and techniques to focus on the Sahasrāra chakra, and Paul and Suzee Grilley, well-known yoga teachers (Paul is the founder of Yin Yoga), as well as well-versed anatomy teachers, assisted Takeshima during the whole workshop. Together, with those experienced teachers, this annual workshop is a great opportunity to experience one of CIHS' principles, "To Understand Human Existence from the Total Perspective of Body, Mind and Spirit."
 
The class started with a meridian exercise. The meridian exercise is a series of physical exercises to mobilize all the joints in the body. Dr. Motoyama teaches that it is important to keep a healthy balance in the physical body through harmony with the mind and spirit in order to attain spiritual development. The meridian exercise devised by Dr. Motoyama is designed to release stagnation of ki (prana) and to lead the physical body to optimized balance. Especially during the course of long held immobilized meditation practice, ki energy will be stagnated in the joints, which results in discomfort in the body. Thus, it might be difficult for the practitioner to meditate longer. By learning and practicing this exercise method, the practitioner can regularize the flow of ki energy in the body and build a firm foundation for longer meditation practice, which leads to spiritual growth.

 
After the meridian exercise, Paul lectured on Dr. Motoyama's theories of multiple dimensions of human beings that includes organized theories of the chakras and the importance of activation/awakening of the chakras for spiritual development. In the afternoon, Mr. Takeshima instructed us on breathing techniques and conducted a meditation focusing on Sahasrāra chakra, and then we closed the first day.
 
The second day began with review of the first day, and we practiced together under the guidance of Mr. Takeshima. Both in the morning and afternoon, we spent more time on meditation. Together we chanted the Heart Sutra for world peace and closed our 2-day annual workshop.
 
It was great workshop, and we all learned on many different levels from those experienced teachers. Since this year's Sahasrāra is the last chakra, we unfortunately have decided to not to start with first chakra next year, despite some requests from attendees to start again. We might plan some other yoga related workshop or classes during the next year, but this specific chakra focused workshop with those master teachers are not planned for the near future. We really appreciate the support of those who came to the workshop and those who have been continually coming throughout this entire process. For the last eight years, it was a wonderful opportunity to experience the CIHS community from yoga masters who are also Dr. Motoyama's disciples.  
 





Faculty Research Symposium:
Subtle Energy & the Integral Sciences


Please join the outstanding faculty of the California Institute for Human Science for a weekend research symposium that will feature the contributions of CIHS faculty to issues and research directed at the cutting edge of integral consciousness and subtle energy research.

In this symposium-course, CIHS faculty will present in dialectical seminar style, their research within the general theme of "applications and directions at the leading edge of consciousness and subtle energies research." This can be taken as either A: a 2 quarter unit course, consisting of full attendance plus a reflection paper, as per degree standards for your program; or B: a 4 unit course consisting of the requirements for (A) plus a substantive research paper including peer reviewed literature, further investigating at least three of the faculty presentations, in an integrated approach.

This Symposium is open to public

Please visit our website from here for more information.





CIHS faculty doing really cool things

Sharon Mijares, Ph.D. 

 
 
   
   
 
In the land where one of the oldest of many civilizations-where the balance between the feminine and the masculine prevailed-faculty Dr. Sharon Mijares attended (and helped to organize) the Women Gathering for Change: Envisioning Ways to Create a Healthier Future in March of 2016.

The famous Library of Alexandria (Bibliotheca Alexandrina) evidenced its recognition regarding the importance of women's contributions to needed changes and inspiring solutions that bring good to all life as they fully sponsored the Program. This famous library began in 300 B.C.E. and was dedicated to the Muses. Tragically it was destroyed by fire around two-thousand years ago. The revised Library continued the ancient mission of gathering knowledge from around the world-making Alexandria a relevant meeting point for cultural dialogues AND for our conference. Wow!

The conference scheduled eleven panels/ The themes included: Women Creating Change, Gender Medicine and Dissemination of Traditional Medicines and Practices, the Collaborative Economy and New forms of Collaborative Development of New Styles of Life, Women Promoting Peace: New Visions and Actions, Refugee Crisis: Loving One's Neighbor as Oneself, Health from a Futuristic Perspective, Women, Nature and Environmental Changes, Future Leadership Style. The Women Creating Change conference concluded on the evening of Friday March 18th, with a closing statement and plans for future actions.

I gave two talks. The first was about Women Creating Change and the second was about "Deep Ancestral Knowing and the Collective Unconscious." My talks are generally "on the edge" and both were well received. All talks are available on https://www.youtube.com/channel/UClxBx3nefQamDrZcQ08po_A

 
 
The Human Foundation co-sponsored this event gifting me with a five-day excursion to Aswan with Abu Simbel, Philai (temples of Isis) including a cruise up the Nile to Luxor to visit Temple of Karnack,Temple of Luxor, Temple of Hatshepsut, Temple of Abydos and other sites. Although this was my fourth trip to Egypt, this one was an unexpected initiation into ancient Egyptian understanding.

In 2017, I will be leading a group to Egypt to meditate at and experience the power and beauty of these ancient teachings with their powerful meanings for present times.

For more on the conference including some great photos, go to
http://articlesfromparis.com/2016/04/08/egypts-silent-revolution/




 
 
Cool things CIHS students are doing

Steven Blonder
M.A. Integral Health Student

 
  
CIHS MA student, Steven Blonder, has recently published some interesting work. And here is a video I developed to promote it:
 

 
 
Diabetes means big numbers and big dollars.  Nearly 30 million of Americans (9.8% of the population) has diabetes (Type 1 and Type 2), resulting in $245 billion in US healthcare costs (growing 8%) annually.
 
Those that suffer with this widespread disease that affects young and old need a better way to manage it.  A better way to track not just what they eat but the affect it has on them.  A better way to communicate with their loved ones and doctors.  A better way to feel confident that they are healthy.
 
As we know, technology is playing a big role in healthcare - enabling quicker diagnosis, more targeted care and helping to lower costs overall.  Patients are also able to take their care into their own hands with innovative apps that enable them to track glucose readings and other vitals.  Let's take this one step further as we look at the power of cognitive and Watson APIs in changing the way diabetics can use information to better their health.
 
With Sophia, diabetics will have the ability to combine and see real-time metrics and how those readings fluctuate based on a variety of factors, with environmental and other factors.  A combination of both nutrition and physical activity has a great effect on a diabetic's wellbeing.  The goal of this system is to provide a single repository for all information that could cause blood sugar levels to fluctuate, potentially reducing hypoglycemic events.
 
Glucose readings will be captured via smart phone or wearable device.  The system will capture food and nutrition intake, physical activity (both active and inactive).
 
Here are some examples of actions a user can take with Sophia:  A user can log physical activity - whether it be running a marathon or reducing stress with transcendental meditation.  They can scan a barcode of an online recipe to predict their potential carb load or weight reduction. They can talk into a device to tell their virtual dietician that they're having a corned beef on rye - very lean and that can be captured in their virtual diary for reference and analysis against that roast beef on wheat they had the day before. They can show their spouse that while they pigged out on that hot fudge sundae the night before - the 45 minutes on the treadmill cancelled the spike out.
 
Every action becomes quantifiable and measurable - even the acupuncture session that treated the burning sensations in the feet that have become recently annoying. The doctor is very happy to see how things changed when he tweaked one medication to another - while all other things remained constant. Coaches and loved ones have plugged into the portal to help motivate and educate high-risk insurance population members. All the privacy Ts were crossed and the liability Is dotted to make sure everyone treated Health 2.0 as it was envisioned - a big crowd-sourced pool of information that could help inform the huge ecosystem surrounding one of the most pervasive, insidious and deadly diseases of our time - Diabetes.

Watson will also bring in contextual Diabetes information from social media like Twitter, Blogs, Recipes, etc. to create the Sophia JCN portal of information in the Health 2.0 world. 

Diabetes currently affects more than 382 million people worldwide and is expected to affect 592 million by 2035.

29.1 million Americans (9.3% of the population) have diabetes (both types) and as many as 2.5 million Americans currently live with type 1, insulin-dependent diabetes. 86 million Americans aged 20 or older are classified as pre-diabetic, including 51% of those aged 65 or older.

Diabetes results in $245 billion annual U.S. healthcare costs, growing 8% each year and driven by complications of poor glucose control. Worldwide, costs of diabetes are estimated to account for 11% of total healthcare expenditures.

Nearly 1 in every 400 children in the U.S. has type 1 diabetes and is insulin-dependent. 26% of the U.S. population aged 65 or older has diabetes

Diabetes is a major cause of heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, blindness, and numerous other debilitating diseases and afflictions. It is the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S.
 
Diabetes means big numbers and big dollars.  Nearly 30 million of Americans (9.8% of the population) has diabetes (Type 1 and Type 2), resulting in $245 billion in US healthcare costs (growing 8%) annually.
 
Those that suffer with this widespread disease that affects young and old need a better way to manage it.  A better way to track not just what they eat but the affect it has on them.  A better way to communicate with their loved ones and doctors.  A better way to feel confident that they are healthy.
 
As we know, technology is playing a big role in healthcare - enabling quicker diagnosis, more targeted care and helping to lower costs overall.  Patients are also able to take their care into their own hands with innovative apps that enable them to track glucose readings and other vitals.  Let's take this one step further as we look at the power of cognitive and Watson APIs in changing the way diabetics can use information to better their health.
 
With Sophia, diabetics will have the ability to combine and see real-time metrics and how those readings fluctuate based on a variety of factors, with environmental and other factors.  A combination of both nutrition and physical activity has a great effect on a diabetic's wellbeing.  The goal of this system is to provide a single repository for all information that could cause blood sugar levels to fluctuate, potentially reducing hypoglycemic events.

Glucose readings will be captured via smart phone or wearable device.  The system will capture food and nutrition intake, physical activity (both active and inactive).
 
Here are some examples of actions a user can take with Sophia:  A user can log physical activity - whether it be running a marathon or reducing stress with transcendental meditation.  They can scan a barcode of an online recipe to predict their potential carb load or weight reduction. They can talk into a device to tell their virtual dietician that they're having a corned beef on rye - very lean and that can be captured in their virtual diary for reference and analysis against that roast beef on wheat they had the day before. They can show their spouse that while they pigged out on that hot fudge sundae the night before - the 45 minutes on the treadmill cancelled the spike out.
 
Every action becomes quantifiable and measurable - even the acupuncture session that treated the burning sensations in the feet that have become recently annoying. The doctor is very happy to see how things changed when he tweaked one medication to another - while all other things remained constant. Coaches and loved ones have plugged into the portal to help motivate and educate high-risk insurance population members. All the privacy Ts were crossed and the liability Is dotted to make sure everyone treated Health 2.0 as it was envisioned - a big crowd-sourced pool of information that could help inform the huge ecosystem surrounding one of the most pervasive, insidious and deadly diseases of our time - Diabetes.

Watson will also bring in contextual Diabetes information from social media like Twitter, Blogs, Recipes, etc. to create the Sophia JCN portal of information in the Health 2.0 world. 

Diabetes currently affects more than 382 million people worldwide and is expected to affect 592 million by 2035.

29.1 million Americans (9.3% of the population) have diabetes (both types) and as many as 2.5 million Americans currently live with type 1, insulin-dependent diabetes. 86 million Americans aged 20 or older are classified as pre-diabetic, including 51% of those aged 65 or older.

Diabetes results in $245 billion annual U.S. healthcare costs, growing 8% each year and driven by complications of poor glucose control. Worldwide, costs of diabetes are estimated to account for 11% of total healthcare expenditures.

Nearly 1 in every 400 children in the U.S. has type 1 diabetes and is insulin-dependent. 26% of the U.S. population aged 65 or older has diabetes

Diabetes is a major cause of heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, blindness, and numerous other debilitating diseases and afflictions. It is the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S.
 
 Steven Blonder's paper can be accessed here: Healthcare in the Era of Cognitive Computing
 
 
Congratulations Steven! We are lucky to have you as a student! 
 

 

 Dr. Motoyama's New Publication 
 "The World of Religious Experiences"   
 

 

We are pleased to announce Dr. Motoyama's new publication.  

 

Dr. Motoyama had his eighty-eighth birthday celebration on December 2013 in Japan, and as one of the commemoration projects of his birthday, we published The World of Religious Experiences in English.  

 

The World of Religious Experiences is a collection of articles written by Dr. Hiroshi Motoyama from about 1955 until the beginning of 1960. The articles were first brought together for the purposes of his doctoral dissertation, and for which he received his Doctor of Literature degree (philosophy, electrophysiology) in March 1962. In 1963, the articles were published together as a book under the title, The World of Religious Experiences, which was Dr. Motoyama's first book length publication.

 

 

Through these articles, Dr. Motoyama has tried to research into the existence the characteristics of religious experiences with metaphysical-ontological elucidation and statistical analysis of electrophysiological experiments based upon his own religious experiences. This collection of research articles is the foundation of the "Motoyama Philosophy." The articles clarify that the world of religious experiences are a true world, which sincerely relates to the basis of human existence. This insight comes from the integration of his deepened religious practices and physiological-physical-experimental studies.

 

We believe that it is very meaningful to have this publication, the foundation of "Motoyama Philosophy," available to the world in time for his eighty-eighth birthday.

 

This book is now available in the CIHS online bookstore.
https://www.cihs.edu/index.php/shop/