MARCH...the onset of spring, and a young dog's (or cat's) fancy lightly turns to thoughts of love. 

In the animal community, this is that time. Amador County Animal Control and Adoption Center joins with A-PAL Humane Society, Best Friends Animal Society, the ASPCA, veterinarians and other informed animal advocates across the country to urge you: SPAY or NEUTER your pets. Pet overpopulation still plagues communities nationwide, both urban and rural.The best way to combat the tragic issue of thousands of unwanted cats and dogs is to permanently prevent reproduction by spaying or neutering your animals early. Diminishing overpopulation is not the only benefit of spaying and neutering. Pets who have had early surgery make better pets because they are less likely to roam, fight, or mark their territories.They have significantly reduced risk of diseases of the reproductive system,and enjoy longer, healthier lives. In Amador County, A-PAL offers a low-cost Spay/Neuter program for people with limited incomes. It is easier than ever to get this crucial surgery, so don't leave it to luck. Make an appointment with your vet now.


CALENDAR of EVENTS
2016
JANUARY 
ADOPT a WORKOUT
PARTNER

FEBRUARY
ADOPT 'THE ONE'
 
MARCH
SPAY and NEUTER AWARENESS
 
APRIL
TRAP/NEUTER/RELEASE

MAY
Find your MISSING PET
 
JUNE  
FELINE FRENZY

WHISKERS & WINE 
Saturday the 18th
 
JULY 
ADOPT a SENIOR PET

AUGUST
$9 for 9 LIVES for 9 DAYS

SEPTEMBER 
ADOPT your MVP

BARK in the PARK
Saturday the 24th

OCTOBER  
ORANGE & BLACK
All Treats, no Tricks

NOVEMBER  
GIVING THANKS 
Animals and their people

DECEMBER  
Bring JOY to your WORLD
LINKS
Still need convincing?More about SPAY/NEUTER

 



Animal MULTIPLICATION TABLES


BARN CATS: Still working!
This is my tale of adopting two black "barn cats".
 
We'd been experiencing multiple incidents of damage from mice and rats around our property. This included chewed refrigerator wires in our motor home, our car engine, even our well.
 
So, we decided to try the age-old proven remedy of rodent control--adopting barn cats through A-PAL's Barn Cat program. Two black cats, one male and one female, were delivered to our home in a large cage complete with a litter box, litter, food and water dishes-all part of the package. It was installed in our shed which would provide a good hiding place for the cats to sleep and be safe. The shed had a small kitty door which gave access to the outside.
 
Following the recommended procedure, for two weeks we kept the cage door closed, cleaned the litter box, replaced their food and water and offered some gentle stroking.  At the end of the two weeks, we opened their cage door and put the litter box, food, and water outside the cage, but still inside the shed with the kitty door closed. The male cat moved out of the cage that first night, to find cozy shelter somewhere in the shed.  After the second night, the female cat followed.  Two more weeks later, we opened the kitty door and moved the litter box, food, and water outside. Shortly after that, the litter box ceased to be used and we removed it, but continued to change their water and put food out in the morning, removing it at night to promote hunting.
 
It has been over six months now and we rarely see the cats, although we have caught sight of them in the shed and crossing the road. They still eat their food and, apparently, the rodents, too, because we no longer have rodent damage or see droppings.
 
They're doing their job and are very successful at avoiding our dogs. 
 
If you want to know more about this program, or would like to adopt a barn cat or two, call Jeff Holman at 304.0928.

Jan Migliaccio  
MERLOT: I'm gonna be a STAR!

MERLOT, a harlequin Great Dane, landed in our shelter unwanted, underweight, and heartworm-positive. Barbara Walther, ACAC & AC's rescue coordinator, arranged for her to go to the East Bay SPCA, where she was ultimately adopted by its President and CEO, Allison Lundquist. Here is Allison's email to us:
 
I thought I'd send this to you in hope that you can forward it to both the shelter staff and volunteers who were involved in rescuing Merlot, the 5 year old harlequin Great Dane that you received as a heartworm positive stray last year. One of your volunteers kindly drove her to us here in Oakland, and I adopted her! She is now heartworm free, spayed, 30 pounds heavier, and living large! Her best friends are Zeus, another rescue Dane, and three very bratty Chihuahuas. She is playful yet gentle with everyone. She is fine with our alpacas and chickens. We love her tremendously and thank you guys for all you do to get animals in your care loving homes. We have modified her name to "Merlie Mae" as she is just too silly to be a "Merlot".

Please thank all of your staff and volunteers on our behalf. 

Kind regards,

Allison




Merlie Mae was recently featured in a video made for East Bay SPCA that has gone viral, with over 1.7 million views and a message that is right on point. See her loping the halls of East Bay SPCA in "OAKTOWN PUP", in the video window below.


DO YOU HAVE A GREAT ADOPTION STORY FROM OUR SHELTER? 
We'd love to hear from you. Send your story, with photos if you have them, to Lisa Peterson.
petreher1@yahoo.com


OAKTOWN PUP


featuring Merlie Mae Lindquist in her breakout role

Thinking of being a VOLUNTEER?
If you would like to join the dedicated ranks of volunteers at Amador County Animal Control & Adoption Center, you can view or print a Volunteer Application here, on the Amador County Website. Final applications must be submitted on pink paper, so you will need to pick up an original at Amador County Animal Control & Adoption Center, 12340 Airport Road, in Martell. They will point you through the process.

LOOK OUT!
Here comes Rodney Cottontail.








Funny? Beautiful? Adorable?
If you have a great animal-related photo,
we would love to share it. Send it to 
Sabeth Ireland, and we will post it here.