CALENDAR of EVENTS
2015
JANUARY  
ADOPT a WORKOUT PARTNER

FEBRUARY

ADOPT a SENIOR SWEETHEART

 

MARCH

SPAY and NEUTER AWARENESS

 

APRIL
TRAP/NEUTER/RELEASE

MAY
BACK in BLACK

WHISKERS & WINE
Saturday 
the 16th

ACAC & AC OPEN HOUSE
Saturday, the 30th

 

JUNE  
Food Bank PET FOOD DRIVE

JULY 
$9 for 9 LIVES for 9DAYS

AUGUST
DOG DAYS of SUMMER

SEPTEMBER  
BARK in the PARK
Saturday the 12th

OCTOBER  
ORANGE & BLACK!

NOVEMBER  
GIVING THANKS 
Testimonials from our adoptive families and animals

DECEMBER  
HOME for the HOLIDAYS
LINKS
 
Why SPAY/NEUTER? 


This March, Amador Shelter Partners joins A-PAL in urging all dog and cat owners to help reduce the number of unwanted animals by spaying or neutering their pets. A decades-long effort to limit the reproduction of dogs and cats in this country has finally shown encouraging results -- a reduced number of animals euthanized each year. There is still much work to be done. All dogs and cats from Amador County Animal Control's Adoption Center are spayed /neutered before being adopted, but not all pets are acquired through shelters. Continued success depends on a committed change in the mindset of every pet owner. You can become your own animal advocacy by encouraging the pet owners you know to make this change. It has never been easier to get these procedures done. A-PAL underwrites several free and low-cost programs right here in Amador County. Let's keep the population of unwanted animals dropping. Love = Spay or Neuter.

 

CAT HOARDING: A Cautionary Tale
This story, from January of this year, provides us with a compelling cautionary tale on the importance of spaying and neutering our pets. Currently, the number of cats (still being captured) has exceeded 30, and it all started only two years ago with one pregnant female. 

 

JANUARY 6, 2015: While serving an eviction notice, the Amador County Sheriff's Office enlisted the assistance of Amador County Animal Control when they discovered over 25 cats living in deplorable conditions. Two of these cats are people-friendly, but extremely thin and now being cared for by animal shelter staff. read more



Why SPAY or NEUTER your pet?

An EXTRAORDINARY GIRL


 

The Tail of the Month was designed to be an outlet for the stories of some of our extraordinary dogs and cats, but here is a story about a committed and generous young person in our community. 

 

Mairin Wyckoff, 7 years old, asks for a puppy every day. So far, her family has not said 'yes' to this because they feel it would be unfair to their 11-year-old dog, Echo. Recently, Mairin asked her mom how our animal shelter paid for the care of its animals. Mom explained that the shelter depends on donations from the public when budgets fall short. After that, nobody was safe! Whenever they happened by, friends and family were asked to donate their pocket change. Mairin set aside the money she collected, but she didn't stop there. She added her own money -- earned from doing chores -- and gave it all to our Rusty Fund (see below).

 

Wow! Mairin, you are a compassionate and awesome young lady. Surely, your story will get others thinking about making donations to help our animals in need. Thank you for your inspiration. 


 


DO YOU HAVE A GREAT ADOPTION STORY FROM OUR SHELTER? 
We'd love to hear from you. Send your story, with photos if you have them, to HAZEL JOYCE
hjoyce1871@yahoo.com.

The RUSTY FUND

The Rusty Fund is a private account founded and managed by volunteers at the Amador County Animal Control and Adoption Center. Its purpose is to make extra money readily available when the overburdened budgets of the animal shelter and A-PAL fall short, as they inevitably do. The account was opened 12 years ago with an unexpected windfall of $1,000, donated by an animal lover who made no demands as to how it should be used. The Fund depends entirely upon donations to stay solvent.

 

It was named as a memorial to a Rottweiler mix who was brought in to the shelter as a stray. It was found that Rusty had torn cruciate ligaments in both knees-a painful condition requiring a difficult and expensive surgery to repair. Because there was no extra money available, Rusty was euthanized. Since then, in his name, dozens of dogs and cats have been able to get a little extra help when they need it, thanks to some compassionate volunteers, generous donors, and a dear, young Rotti who couldn't afford his own treatment.

A message from A-PAL
A-PAL Humane Society has been assisting Amador County residents for over 35 years and is now asking for your help with the cats captured from the cat hoarding site.

Amador County Animal Control has been trapping these cats and turning them over to the Jackson Creek Veterinary Clinic, where they are being spayed or neutered, given a rabies shot and ear-tipped to identify them as sterilized.

What A-PAL needs most are humane homes where barn/garage/shop cats can live out their lives.We will bring the cats to you. We ask that you provide food and shelter.

Please call Jeff at 209-304-0928 if you can provide a home for one or two of these beautiful cats. If you would like to make a donation, please send a check to 

A-PAL Humane Society | P.O.Box 190  Jackson, CA | 95642.

please see our ad below.