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IN THIS ISSUE

Meta-analysis offers research on research for MR

The Researcher's Bookshelf: The AIM Process

Emotional branding creates the bond

The Social Side of Research

From our blogs

Research War Stories: 'You will need to come to the station house...'
 

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Meta-analysis offers research on research for MR

By Kevin Gray   

  

Meta-analysis is a set of procedures for statistically synthesizing  the results of several primary studies. It is research on research and is used when we want examine the body of evidence about a topic, rather than relying on the results of a single study. Even in rigorous disciplines such as medicine, studies often do not agree in their central conclusions and meta-analysis provides a systematic way to examine a collection of results, typically effect sizes, across multiple primary studies. It also sheds light on factors potentially underlying dissimilarities in findings and helps us make sense of the patterns of effects. It began to take root in the '90s and is applied in medicine, ecology, psychology, education, business and other fields for the evaluation of government programs. It is still quite new to marketing research and arguably underutilized.

 

The Researcher's Bookshelf: The AIM Process

A Systematic, Stepwise Procedure for Improving the Actionability of Marketing Research  

By Paul Conner 

In his new book, The AIM Process, Paul Conner outlines how marketing researchers and marketing research users can work together in designing and conducting marketing research that provides solid direction in making decisions from its results. This article, adapted and edited from a chapter in the book, addresses the challenge created by a purpose-process disconnect and why MR must be actionable to be useful.

A fundamental problem with marketing research lies in a disconnect between its primary purpose and the procedure by which it's traditionally conceived, designed and conducted.  

 

  

Emotional branding creates the bond
By Ed Jessup                             

Emotional branding has been described as the practice of building brands that appeal directly to a consumer's ego, emotional state, needs and aspirations. And what company wouldn't want its brand to resonate emotionally with consumers? Christie Barakat, assistant professor of media and psychology in Florence, Italy, says that while "traditional consumer decision-making models are grounded in the theory of rational choices and are largely cognitive and sequential in nature, emotional branding is irrational." It is irrational in the sense those consumers might place an attachment to a product in the abstract or the way a product makes them feel or appear.

 

  Read on...

The Social Side of Research
Ideas and insights on MR from around the Web


The Quirk's e-newsletter regularly highlights a handful of active and intriguing discussions from LinkedIn and other forums around the Web so you can stay on top of the research scuttlebutt as it's happening. Here are four popular discussions from the past few weeks. More details after the jump. Comments have been edited for clarity and brevity.

Lily Allen deems MR 'totally unhelpful'
Posted by Emily Goon in The Marketing Research & Insights Group

What's the difference between consumer insights and market research?
Posted by Paulo Santana Consumer Insights Interest Group

Physician-pharmacist-patient triads advice
Posted by Sue Gartzman in QRCA Qualitative Research Discussion

Know of a discussion worthy of being featured? Contact Quirk's Content Editor Emily Goon at emily@quirks.com.
 

Read on... 

From our blogs

 


Versatility makes ranch the granddaddy of today's flavors

Kroger's QueVision fuses data points to shorten checkout lines

MR job prospects show promise of upward mobility

Lily Allen deems MR 'totally unhelpful'

Research War Stories: 'You will need to come to the station house...'

 

As a bright, young graduate of an MBA program, Bernadette DeLamar recalls joining a consulting firm that actually went so far as to collect consumer data as a basis for analyses and recommendations to clients.  

 

During her second month with the firm, DeLamar was sent to London to spend several weeks managing fieldwork. The firm's local fieldwork vendor had arranged for daytime use of a music club/nightspot on Oxford Street in central London, leaving the researchers to recruit consumers as they passed by. The recruiters would usher screened respondents into the club to review various product samples and complete a PC-based questionnaire.

 

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