Articles | Suppliers | Jobs | MyQuirks |EventsSeptember 9, 2013
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IN THIS ISSUE

Researchers offer strategies for keeping MR function relevant in a big data world

Two ways to visualize 'small data'

Resort community uses hypnosis to get in touch with buyers' childhood emotions

Intelligent design: Packaging food with purpose

From our blogs

Research War Stories: She became a little child speaking of her daddy...
 

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Researchers offer strategies for keeping MR function relevant in a big data world   

By Joseph Rydholm
 
In conjunction with the Market Research in the Mobile World (MRMW) conference in Minneapolis in July, I moderated a brief panel discussion that used as its jumping-off point a conversation thread from the Quirk's Marketing Research & Insights Group on LinkedIn. The thread - titled "Is there still room for the human researcher or has technology taken over?" - obviously struck a chord, as evidenced by the thread's many lengthy and passionate posts.

 

For those of us in the marketing research industry, the question is obviously moot. Of course we think there is room for the researcher. But we're not the ones who need convincing. 

                                                                               

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Two ways to visualize 'small data'
By Michael Lieberman

 

As big data becomes more accessible, visualization services have grown exponentially. These have produced extremely agile, open-source graphics platforms that can graph consumer transaction data and huge clusters of preferences (e.g., which movies on Netflix a customer might like given his past choices) and provide visual representation of the social network activity.

 

This is all terrific news for the marketing research industry.

 Read on...

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Resort community uses hypnosis to get in touch with buyers' childhood emotions 
By Matt Schroder

From our archives, this case study details how Innsbrook Resort turned to hypnosis for part of its qualitative research to uncover the deep-seated needs of prospective vacation-home buyers and used the results to shape the marketing messages and Web site for a new development.

 

Imagine a small resort community in the Midwest, lined with trees, rolling hills and lakes as far as the eye can see. This tranquil sanctuary offers peace and quiet, even amidst the ongoing activities: concerts, movies, fitness activities, theater performances.

 

Now imagine you're part of the management team for this resort. You've just purchased 1,200 acres of undeveloped land that surrounds your property. How will you develop this new space so that you'll attract new property owners, keep your existing property owners and stay true to your existing peaceful atmosphere? 

 

Read on... 

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Intelligent design: Packaging food with purpose
By Len Pollack                 

 

You may not realize it but when you pick up a package of cheese or a box of tea at the grocery store, a variety of factors influence your decision to purchase. Is it portable? Easy to open and use? Eco-friendly? Customers in the market for everything from paper towels to meatballs look at packaging for quick cues - we want our purchases to reflect our needs and values. Hot Pockets = portability. Amy's = quality. Burt's Bees = eco-friendly. Packaging affects purchasing.

The message packaging communicates has proven to play a large role in sales. Packaging determines thousands of dollars of spend every year - a consideration companies should factor in as they strive to cut or maintain costs while preserving quality products.

 Read on...

From our blogs

 


Call it what you will - MR crops up at SEAT 2013   

 

How community contribution can benefit your panel  

 

CRC sneak peek: Coca-Cola's Chris Elsbury on delivering successful presentations 

 

How to recruit articulate research respondents 

 

How to avoid the 10 most common loyalty program pitfalls 

 

A short note from an angry, job-hunting researcher 

 

How to write high-impact marketing research reports 

 

Research powers NFL's drive to enhance fans' game-day experience

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Research War Stories: She became a little child speaking of her daddy...

Barbara Gural recalls moderating a focus group among people who served as caregivers to their family members with Alzheimer's.
At the start of the group, one particular respondent, a woman in her 40s, behaved normally. But later she acted as if she were deaf and after that she became a little child speaking of her daddy. Some respondents shifted in their seats, those closest to her actually easing their chairs as far away as they politely could from the woman.  

 

Read on... 

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