New Jersey Chamber of Commerce

N.J. CHAMBER NEWS

MARCH 28, 2012

 

 

 

 

Oil Sands

 

John Prato, the Consul General of Canada in New York, said New Jersey has the know-how to help Canada increase its energy production in Alberta, and to multiply profits for companies in Canada and New Jersey.

 

 

 Canadian Energy Executives to New Jersey Contractors:

'We Need Your Help'

 

Canada's largest energy companies are seeking suppliers from New Jersey to help them tap into the vast oil reserves of Alberta - a region estimated to hold almost two trillion barrels of oil in the form of a petroleum that occurs naturally in the sands of western Canada.

 

These energy companies are looking for energy partners to help them build plants, drill for oil and operate facilities in these oil sands of Alberta - the kind of partnerships that can lead to lucrative contracts for New Jersey engineers, architects, environmental experts, office managers, software providers, manufacturers and others. 


That was the message from executives from the Canadian energy companies who met with 75 prospective suppliers at a networking event in East Brunswick yesterday coordinated by the New Jersey Chamber of Commerce, the state's Business Action Center and the Consulate General of Canada.


"We are looking for products and services and sometimes people to come up and work on the oil sands," said Kendall Dilling, manager of regulatory and government affairs for Laricina Energy. "We are resource constrained, but the capital is there, so we are looking to New Jersey to help us push back the frontier." 

 

That sentiment was echoed by representatives of five other big energy companies in Canada - Cenovus, Canadian Natural Resources, ExxonMobil, Suncor Energy and MEG Energy.


John Prato, the Consul General of Canada in New York, said New Jersey has the know-how to help Canada increase its energy production in Alberta, and to multiply profits for companies in Canada and New Jersey. "This state has everything we need: a history of manufacturing, engineering and environmental jobs," Prato said. "This is the first event of its kind in the U.S, and we picked New Jersey by design, not by accident."


More than 1,000 American companies already are doing business in Canada's energy industry, and Canada does more than $13 billion in trade with New Jersey every year, making it the state's largest trading partner by far.


New Jersey Chamber of Commerce President Tom Bracken served as master of ceremonies of yesterday's event. Also speaking were New Jersey Lt. Gov. Kim Guadagno and New Jersey Chamber Chairman Jeff Scheininger.

 

"New Jersey is here to do business," Guadagno said. "We want your business, we are open for business and we are willing to fight for your business."

   

"We do in New Jersey what you are looking for in Canada," the lieutenant governor added. "And we do it better than anywhere else."


For more information on doing business with Canadian energy companies, e-mail Ben Steltzer at the New Jersey Chamber of Commerce at Ben@njchamber.com.