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An Interview with Terry Hutchinson
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"I was 3 years old and because I was the youngest of three, and inevitably the most annoying, my parents stuck me in our little Dyer dinghy attached to a long painter and let me have it for long summer days. "   

 

Terry Hutchinson goes down memory lane and shares his experience as a sailing dad.  

Terry Hutchinson

Terry Hutchinson, ARTEMIS RACING/S vd Borch

(3 May, 2011) - The mission of the Southport Sailing Foundation is to help prepare sailors, primarily youth and young adults, for national and international competitions. Other goals include introducing people to the joys of sailing and promoting respect for all aspects of the sport. With this objective in mind, we continue our series of interviews with famous sailors who are also parents of young and upcoming sailors. Their advice is priceless!  

 

This month we talk to Terry Hutchinson, who joined Artemis Racing as helmsman for the Louis Vuitton Trophy regattas and the RC44 Championship Tour in 2009. That same year he also added the Audi MedCup circuit title with TP52 Quantum Racing to his impressive list of accomplishments, which includes winning the Louis Vuitton Cup in 2007 (5-0) as Tactician of Emirates Team New Zealand. Terry's resume also includes J24, Farr 40 and IMS World Champion titles.

 

CLEVER PIG: How and when did you start sailing?

TERRY HUTCHINSON: I was 3 years old and because I was the youngest of three, and inevitably the most annoying, my parents stuck me in our little Dyer dinghy attached to a long painter and let me have it for long summer days. From there it was on to Lasers and then I420s and college sailing.

 

CP: How did you transition from a young aspiring sailor to a world-renowned top-level professional?

TH: The beauty of loving your job is that you never get bored or tired of practicing. I was always motivated to go sailing. It was easy for me to do and I was really lucky to have the support of my parents when I was younger and now my wife and family. Each day on a boat there is something new and different and regardless you always learn. Some lessons come harder than the others, but in the end when you put together a good regatta or can see the progress of things that you have worked on, it is well worth the effort.

 

CP: Do you enjoy being involved in sailing as a parent?

TH: Yes and no. I want my kids to love sailing for what it is to them, not to me. The worst thing that can happen is for a coach or competitor to compare my child to me or set certain expectations because Elias, Katherine or Aden are my children. If they love the sport and the independence that sailing brings to them, then that is enough for me. 

 

CP: How does your sailing expertise affect your kids' sailing?

TH: It doesn't. I still get on the boat and they tell me what to do. Nothing is different on land or on the water.

 

CP: What advice would you give to all the young sailors who are at the beginning of their careers?

TH: Enjoy the sport and keep it for what it is at this point in your life. Sailing is a life sport and you can achieve many great things, but the most important things will be the people you meet and the relationships you make through this great sport.

 

CP: What advice would you give to parents of young sailors?

TH: Remember that sailing is supposed to be fun. If you ram the sport down a child's throat to the point that they don't enjoy the sailing, it will chase them away forever. Not every child is going to be an Olympian or a World Champion but that should not be the goal. If they have fun and enjoy it, you will increase the chances of medals....

 

CP: What projects are you working on and what's in your future?

TH: Currently I am at the beginning of the 34th America's Cup program with Artemis Racing. We are a Swedish team representing the KSSS out of Stockholm. The game has changed dramatically and it is an incredible challenge and opportunity. That should cover the next couple of years at least!

 

You can also find Terry's interview on the Clever Pig website at http://www.cleverpig.org/resnews.php 

About Clever Pig
The www.CleverPig.org website brings together a wide range of resources and tools for racing sailors. Sailors can create their own campaign web page, calendar, resume and budget. They can apply for grants, search for coaches and get local knowledge about regatta venues. They will find resources on one-design classes and regattas, sample materials from previous campaigns, plus extensive lists of campaign FAQs and links. The tools and resources on the Clever Pig website are provided free for any sailor through the support of the Southport Sailing Foundation.
 

About the Southport Sailing Foundation   
The Southport Sailing Foundation is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization that was founded to promote the sport of sailing, both regionally and nationally. A primary mission of the Foundation is to help prepare sailors, mainly youth and young adults, for national and international competitions at all levels of our sport. The Foundation was started several years ago in Connecticut by a group of sailors who grew up racing on Long Island Sound. Current Board members include Susan Daly, Brad Dellenbaugh, David Dellenbaugh, Kelly D. Laferriere, Bob Larsen, Dave Perry, Barry Simson, Mary Von Conta, John Watkins and Peter Wilson.
 
For more information:
Southport Sailing Foundation Inc.
P.O. Box 946, Southport, CT 06890
info@southportsailing.org

Southport Sailing Foundation  P.O. Box 946, Southport, CT 06890
www.cleverpig.org Southport Sailing Foundation Board Members