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Meet Connie!
Manager's Message
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Dear ,

 

It's a new year -- a fresh start for everyone!

This year may prove to be the upswing we've all been waiting for.  As you get busier, remember that your friends at Cascade Title are ready to provide the service you need for your next transaction.

Happy New Year!

 

Sincerely,

 

Your Friends at Cascade Title Company

Meet Connie Bjornstrom!      

  

StaffConnieConnie Bjornstrom has "rejoined" the Cascade Title team.  For those of you who haven't met Connie, here's a little bit of info about her:

Connie was born and raised in Longview and lives with her husband, Rick and their cat "Tigger."  She has 3 married daughters, two of which live in Seattle and the other in San Clemente, California.

Connie enjoys cooking, road trips and spending time at the coast clam digging or just relaxing.  She worked for nearly 7 years at Cowlitz County Title and then moved to Cascade Title where she worked for a year.  She has recently returned to Cascade a month ago -- and we're glad to have her back!

Come in and say "hello" to Connie next time you stop in! 
    

Cascade Title's Manager Message

    

Joel
Joel Lengyel
Manager

"Happy New Year!" That greeting will be said and heard for at least the first couple of weeks as a new year gets under way. But the day celebrated as New Year's Day in modern America was not always January 1.   

 

The celebration of the New Year is the oldest of all holidays. It was first observed in ancient Babylon about 4000 years ago. In the years around 2000 BC, the Babylonian New Year began with the first New Moon (actually the first visible crescent) after the Vernal Equinox (first day of spring).  The beginning of spring is a logical time to start a new year. After all, it is the season of rebirth, of planting new crops, and of blossoming. January 1, on the other hand, has no astronomical nor agricultural significance. It is purely arbitrary. The Babylonian New Year celebration lasted for eleven days. Each day had its own particular mode of celebration, but it is safe to say that modern New Year's Eve festivities pale in comparison.  

 

The Romans continued to observe the New Year in late March, but their calendar was continually tampered with by various emperors so that the calendar soon became out of synchronization with the sun. In order to set the calendar right, the Roman senate, in 153 BC, declared January 1 to be the beginning of the New Year. But tampering continued until Julius Caesar, in 46 BC, established what has come to be known as the Julian Calendar. It again established January 1 as the New Year. But in order to synchronize the calendar with the sun, Caesar had to let the previous year drag on for 445 days. Although in the first centuries AD the Romans continued celebrating the New Year, the early Catholic Church condemned the festivities as paganism. As Christianity became more widespread, the early church began having its own religious observances concurrently with many of the pagan celebrations, and New Year's Day was no different. Traditionally, it was thought that one could affect the luck they would have throughout the coming year by what they did or ate on the first day of the year. For that reason, it has become common for folks to celebrate the first few minutes of a brand new year in the company of family and friends. Parties often last into the middle of the night after the ringing in of a new year.

 

Many cultures believe that anything in the shape of a ring is good luck, because it symbolizes "coming full circle," completing a year's cycle. For that reason, the Dutch believe that eating donuts on New Year's Day will bring good fortune. One of the most venerable New Years traditions is the champaign toast at midnight to ring in the New Year. Toasting can be traced back to the ancient Romans and Greeks who would pour wine, to be shared among those attending a religious function, from a common pitcher. The host would drink first, to assure his guests that the wine was not poisoned. In those days the wine was not as refined as it is today so a square of burned bread (toast) would be floated in the wine bowl and then eaten by the last person to drink. The bread was put there to absorb the extra acidity of the wine in order to make it more palatable. Eventually, the act of drinking in unison came to be called a toast, from the act of "toasting" or putting toast into the wine.  

 

The song, "Auld Lang Syne," playing in the background, is sung at the stroke of midnight in almost every English-speaking country in the world to bring in the New Year. At least partially written by Robert Burns in the 1700's, it was first published in 1796 after Burns' death. Early variations of the song were sung prior to 1700 and inspired Burns to produce the modern rendition. An old Scottish tune, "Auld Lang Syne" literally means "old long ago," or simply, "the good old days."  

 

Happy New Year from everyone here at Cascade Title!!!



Take care,  

 

Joel Lengyel

 

1425 Maple Street, Longview, WA 98632
Phone:  (360) 425-2950
Fax:  (360) 425-8010
Toll Free:  (877) 425-2950 

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