GFP Logp 
Lori Garton's
Garden Philosophy
 
"I believe that a garden will flourish if stewarded sustainably. As responsible land care-takers we should be growing our soil -- not depleting it. That means not using any synthetic substances, including pesticides and fertilizers. It also means adding to the soil.
 
Composting is a key component to our Good Food Project garden. The more biodiverse an ecosystem is the healthier it is. That's why we grow as many different species as possible, including worms, chickens and bees. The more things that we have growing ... the more natural nutrient cycling and weed, insect and disease control there will be (and the less we have to do!).
 
This type of growing takes patience -- Mother Nature does take her time. So take a deep breath, take one step at a time, and let's grow together!"
 
-- Lori Garton, Director
Good Food Project

April Cucumber
artichokes
-- Thank You --
 The Good Food Project earnestly thanks the following businesses and individuals for their support in providing plants, supplies or services for the community garden.
 
Acme Brick
Lowe's of Alexandria
Petrus Feed & Seed
Inglewood Farm 
 Richard "Ricky" Melder
Garden Path & Stone Center
Frances Boudreaux
What Our Garden Needs
 The following items are needed to enhance our community garden.
 
 Manure
Compost
Plant Growing Containers**
Leaves
 
**Does not have to be conventional containers like planters and pots. Can be anything that a plant is able fit into and can have drainage holes added to it.
 
Please contact Lori Garton at goodfoodproject@fbcenla.org
 or 445-2773 if you are able to donate any of these items.
 
Thank You! 
 
Connect Online
 
 Good Food Project Website:
  
Join our facebook community at http://www.facebook.com/goodfoodproject 
 
Recommended Websites:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sprout

Good Food Project Garden News

 

May 2012

Thank you for your interest in the Good Food Project, which is operated under the direction of the Food Bank of Central Louisiana in partnership with the Central Louisiana Community Foundation and funded through the generous support of Keller Enterprises.
 
Our Sprout newsletter will keep you current with the Good Food Project (GFP) and provide useful information about growing your own healthy food and enjoying the lifelong benefits of gardening.
 

Rodney
 
Remembering Rodney Verzwyvelt

 

All of us involved with the Good Food Project mourn the death of Rodney Verzwyvelt, who passed away last month.

 

Rodney always will be gratefully remembered as one of the earliest Good Food Project volunteers who passionately and expertly took charge of the hoop house building project at the Good Food Project garden site.  He also assisted in teaching a class with GFP director Lori Garton on growing tomatoes.

 

He retired from the Natural Resource Conservation Service after 37 years and worked for the Rapides Soil and Water Conservation District the past eight years.  Rodney was known locally as a prodigous producer of hoop house tomatoes.

 

The Good Food Project honors the memory of Rodney Verwyvelt with a permanent plaque of appreciation for his vital contribution to the GFP hoop house.

 

We are thankful for the donation from the friends of Rodney in his memory to provide pavers for the hoop house.

 

We Love Volunteers
There are many volunteer opportunities at The Food Banks of Central Louisiana's Good Food Project garden.
 
Volunteers may participate in planting, harvesting, soil preparation, composting, pruning, weeding, watering, landscaping, building projects,  general maintenance and other needs.
 
Individuals, families, groups and students are welcome. Please contact Lori Garton at (318) 445-2773 or
for more information about volunteer activities.
 

Remember, when you volunteer to help at our garden, not only are you helping to alleviate hunger in our community, but you will be learning about sustainable and organic growing too! 

Tulips Notecard Sale to Benefit Good Food Project 
 
These notecards were created from original artwork by Frances Boudreaux, who was inspired as a volunteer of the Good Food Project garden. A portion of the proceeds will go to this worthy cause.

Set of 6 cards and envelopes can be yours for $10 cash or check made out to The Food Bank of Central Louisiana with a memo of Good Food Project. To order yours, email goodfoodproject@fbcenla.org or call
(318) 445-2773.

Green Market

Every Saturday

In Downtown Alexandria

  

Fresh, local organic produce, natural pecans, grass-fed beef, pastured poultry and eggs are available for sale every Saturday from 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. at the Alexandria Museum of Art near City Hall.  

 

Local producers interested in becoming a vendor should contact the Alexandria Museum of Art. 

2 More GFP Classes Scheduled
 
 May 12, 9 a.m.
Animals & Wildlife in the Garden
 
June 16, 9 a.m.
Garden Herbs
  

The Good Food Project classes are free and are taught at The Food Bank of Central Louisiana. Each participant will receive a Topsy Turvy aerial planter.

 

Registration for planning purposes is required.  Please indicate your attendance by contacting  goodfoodproject@fbcenla.org or

445-2773.

What You Can Plant
This Month
 
The number of summer crops suitable for planting this month is limited in Central Louisiana, but the LSU AgCenter lists the following vegetables that can be planted in May.
 Snap Beans (by May 15)
Lima Beans
Sweet Corn (by May 15)
Eggplant
Okra
Peanuts
Hot Peppers
Bell Peppers (by May 15)
Sweet Potatoes
Pumpkins
Summer Squash
Watermelons

Sustainable Garden
  Tip of the Month
 This is the time of year where lots of things are growing- including the insect populations! To naturally repel insects from your garden and home, plant strong smelling flowers and plants. You can plant marigolds or nasturtiums among your vegetables. They naturally repel insects and nasturtiums are edible too. Nasturtiums add a peppery zing to your salad and they produce beautiful (also edible) flowers as well.

 

Almost any herb will help in the fight against insects-  although those in the mint family seem to do it best. Mint will take over an area easily so if you are going to plant mint, make sure you do it in a place that it is able to spread. If you do not want them to spread all over, then plant them in pots and place them strategically in your garden near your prized veggies like squashes and tomatoes.

 

 

 

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