Basil 
ITS SUMMERTIME! 
Page down for how to for tomatoes and basil and recipes !
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Triple Oaks Nursery & Herb Garden Newsletter
Summer
August 2012
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in this issue
Fresh Flowers at Triple Oaks
Summer to do
Basil and tomatoes, growing, harvesting and recipes


Dear Triple Oaks Friends ,

Lots to remind you about and news and events.  First , Wednesday August 1 is our big Byers Choice tea in honor of Charles Dickens 200th birthday.
                               scroughecharles dickens byers choicemrs Cracket
    
   
oin us for desserts and  tea. Hear all about Byers Choice, a local to the Delaware Valley art form and see many beautiful collectibles.  As you know, Byers figures are rarely on sale, BUT
We will have many of the retired and older pieces marked 30 to 50 % off~ Call now to reserve a place at this complimentary event. dorothy and toto byers



Next, did you know that we have been a local home town florist since 1976? WE were accepted into FTD and other wire services in 1981. I chuckle when folks say , I didn't know you did fresh flowers. I can vouch for hours and hours of work making wedding, funeral and holiday flowers long into the night to have orders ready.
Please call us for all your local south Jersey needs. We deliver funeral flowers to all local funeral homes, do large family funerals even further away and deliver weddings all over the Delaware Valley.


Local Delivery is 7 days a week.
We can also wire out for you. Remember to call us, you save a lot when you call direct rather than use a middle man via the internet. We call these people gatherers as they get an order, take off a large percent  and then wire it to us anyhow. Think twice before going through a gatherer on the internet who may not even be in this country. Shop local and use your local businesses.

Lastly, it is summertime. Hopefully you are picking tomatoes, basil and lots of other goodies in your garden. If not, shop farmers markets and local stand to get fresh local produce.

Come see our beautiful herbs, annuals and perennials. Annuals and herbs still 50%   off. Roses still 50 % off. We are open 7 days.
 
Keep your plants fed and watered. always check soil to be sure the water is going down to the bottom of root.

 
Fresh Flower Florist Shop at Triple Oaks
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Please stop by when you need any occasion flowers. Lorraine or one of the designers, Carly, Lynn or Michele will make you a beautiful arrangement in a style , color, and price range of your choice. 

Take a peak of some of the arrangements we can make for you. From comical novelty pieces, to elegant vases for all occasions to beautiful wedding flowers and heartfelt sympathy flowers. We can do them all for you.

  wedding show bouquet2 funearl basekt

funeral sprayroses lkmich

Article Headline
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cardinal flwoers  

  

Late summer list of to do chores in the garden!

  

Have you noticed  some changes in the garden now ? Makes me want to say where is summer going.  The  beans are abundant as long as we keep the darn groundhogs out, the egg plant plentiful , peppers and squash ever ready  so we are very busy picking and cooking.  Tomatoes are ripe  adn it seems like summer hardly got here and now  kids are worrying about  going back to school! 

But , there  is still a lot of wonderful garden time left.  A few easy chores can keep your garden in top shape for a few more months of great color and bloom. Don't let annuals look spent, feed them a sprinkle of a plant food such as osmocote and give them a drink of 'blue' water with is any common plant food in water. The extra watering during hot spells depletes food in the soil. Take some  time to trim back dead blooms on  annuals, because with some food and a good soaking they will give you vibrant color until frost. 

Perennials can also be trimmed back and fed and many will flower once more. Our yarrow, tansy, and even some monarda are blooming again. Although I cut the dead blooms off some   perennials  I leave the seeds on black-eyed Susans and other plants if I want them to reseed. Cut phlox off if you do not want them  to spread all over the garden.  The birds also like to pick on seeds and roost in tall plants in fall

 Coneflowers keep blossoming if deadheaded. Be sure to soak late perennials so they have the strength to bloom well.  When the ground is  dry  the short cloudbursts of thunder showers do not water deeply. A good soaking every few weeks is in order this time of the year. 

 Prune the roses back, fed them, and sprinkle  them with sulfur or copper to combat any fungus . They will look wonderful in just a few weeks. New leaves, lots of buds and clean, shiny foliage will greet the fall. Be sure to always remove any diseased leaves that might have black spot, which is a fungus. The spores live in the soil, so raking up old leaves and sprinkling with copper or sulfur will keep the disease at bay.

      This past week everyone here has been pulling weeds whenever we get the change. It is really important to get rid of weeds so that they cannot go to seed. It will save hours of weeding next spring and is great exercise for an hour each night after dinner.   rose floribunda rose

Remember that most plants, including perennials continue to grow over the winter as long as the ground is not frozen. Light mulch is good if you do not have rodents that will borrow under it. 

I usually put most house plants out on my porch. We have all of the Christmas cacti and orchids outside. They have all been repotted, fed and now await the seasonal light requirements that will encourage the formation of buds. It is easier to leave them outside where they get good sun during the day and a dark night with no artificial light. Most will set buds by the time the frost warning alerts us to bring them in. Others will do so a bit later, but all will be robust from spending the summer outside.

orchid  

As some plants finish up for the season, others are just beginning to put on their show.  Watch for late summer and fall blooming trees and shrubs. Add a few butterfly weeds and bushes for butterflies, crape myrtle  and vitex for color and fall blooming perennials.  It is never too late to plant.

Www, tripleoaks.com   check out week fall landscape and herb classes . 

  

 
Basil and tomatoes! Hooray for summertime Jersey produce!
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It Is Not Too Late To Plant Basil Plants 

Basil is one of the most useful and loved herbs today. People all over the world use it, but Americans are probably one of the biggest consumers of Sweet Basil or Italian Basil as it is commonly called.

 

It is grown in   gardens and patio pots for culinary use all over the United States. Basil is in the labiate family of plants and it is in the genus Ocimum that comes from a Greek word that means to be fragrant. Its species name is basilicum a word that comes from the Greek and which means king or prince. So this king of all herbs, often said to be the most useful and popular herb is a favorite among both cooks and gardeners.  

 

There are more than 30 different species of basil available. The ones used most for cooking besides the sweet basil are dwarf basil with spicy 

Globe being most familiar of these, there are also Thai basil Siam Queen, Lemon basil both Sweet Dani and Mrs. Burns and purple Basil. These are used both in foods and in vinegars, as well as for ornamental purposes.  

 

It is important to note that if you grow basil you need to plant a few tomatoe plants near it. These plants both need the same conditions and will thrive near one another. Plus  many folks use them together so it is convenient to pick  them both at the same time.  At this time of the year buy late tomato plants, bury them so that at least half of the stem is below the soil, feed and water well and you will soon have tomatoes. Large types of tomatoes should be planted directly in the ground, but cherry, plum or any small variety will   do real well in a large pot surrounded by basil. Remember both plants need full sun. 

 

GROWING BASIL

Basil needs very warm weather in which to really thrive. I find 

planting basil by seed after Memorial Day and then planting again at July 4th or there about I am insured a great supply of basil well into fall. Some people plant one more time in August to make pesto to freeze for winter. We have great trays of basil 1/2 price now ,come get some!

 Water when dry and cut back as needed. Basil needs some food if you have sandy soil and also does best with an inch of water a week. Feed the plants with some time release granular if you have sandy soil. Follow directions and do not over feed any herb if you wish to have the best flavor.  

Any extra plants can be grown in pots on the deck and then brought in to a sunny window in winter. They might not make it all winter, it all depends on the amount of sun.  

HARVESTING BASIL 

When the basil become tall you may cut the top off to encourage new growth. Always harvest the leaves on a stem rather than by just pulling them off the plant. Snip a length of stem one or two inches or longer.  This helps the plant to grow better. Cut off blooms early on to encourage fresh growth.

Chopped basil leaves are wonderful on fresh tomatoes with olive oil.  It is a must in good spaghetti sauce and a great combo with Parmesan cheese on many vegetables and meats.   Chop basil, along with a few other favorite herbs and mix into butter for a delicious herb butter to serve on crusty Italian bread or baked potatoes or even to toss on pasta. 

Pesto is a mixture of basil, olive oil, and Parmesan cheese and often pine nuts. To prepare the basil for this, pull off the leaves from a stem that has been cut from the plant and add them to olive oil in a blender or food processor. Continue until a paste is formed.  I have done cups and cups of this when basils are plentiful and put it in the freezer for winter use. The best way to freeze this oil and basil paste is to put it in small zip lock bags and flatten it. That way you may break off just what you need, rather than dealing with thick ice cubes of basil mix.  I use this all winter, adding it to sautéed garlic and oil before adding plum tomatoes for my spaghetti sauce.  

 

Basil is a summer herb and rarely will grow indoors, so enjoy it fresh 

And freeze lots of it.  Basil is very easy to grow and fun to pick. I also rub it on my arms and legs when working the garden because this will keep mosquitoes keep away!  This really works!

 

 

 

Pesto

 

 Puree in blender or processor:

*1-cup olive oil

*2 packed cups fresh basil leaves (stems removed)

2 large cloves garlic (baked)

1 packed cup fresh parsley

Sauté:

4 tbsp butter

4 tbsp olive oil

 5 large cloves garlic

 

 Boil 1 lb linguine; add the puree to sauté when finished. Toss with linguine; add 1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese. May also add pine nuts. Pesto may be frozen.

 

  • These first two ingredients can be done ahead and kept in zip lock bag in freezer. Flatten like sheets of paper to store and use in an easy manner. 

 

 

 

 

Marinara Sauce

 

 4 tbsp olive oil

4 cloves garlic

1 onion finely chopped 

2 cans plum tomatoes or fresh tomatoes

 2 sprigs (about 2 -3 inches long) freshly chopped basil

Equal amounts of fresh parsley to add to tomatoes

 Salt/pepper to taste

 

 Sauté garlic and onion in olive oil until golden. Put tomatoes in blender, add to olive oil. Cook 20-30 minutes.  Add the last cup of tomatoe with herbs in it, stir in and shut off heat. Serve over pasta, meats or vegetables. 

 

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