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Greetings!

 

Here is today's summary of economic development news, presented by the Economic Development Partnership of Alabama. 

 

in this issue:
Vance auto suppliers' expansion to create 120 jobs - Tuscaloosa News
Wayne Farms LLC trimming 363 Alabama jobs
Lawrence County seeks economic development chief - Birmingham News
Trade Restructuring in Century's First Decade Will Affect International Economy in the Next - Industry Week

 


  
Vance auto suppliers' expansion to create 120 jobs
By Patrick Rupinski
Staff Writer
Published: Friday, November 18, 2011 at 3:30 a.m.Last Modified: Thursday, November 17, 2011 at 7:44 p.m.

Two German automotive suppliers with plants in Vance announced expansion plans Thursday that will create more than 120 new industrial jobs over the next few years.

Brose, a privately owned German automotive supplier that has served the Mercedes-Benz plant in Vance since 2004, announced a $19.5 million expansion that will allow it to increase its production and result in 94 new jobs, said Johannes Carl, the Tuscaloosa plant's general manager. It is Brose's third announced expansion for its Vance plant in the last 24 months.

In October, Brose was named the first automotive supplier for the next generation of the C-Class sedan, which Mercedes will add to its Vance production in 2014.

At the time, Carl said the new C-Class contract would result in the hiring of about 80 additional employees, but on Thursday he upped that number to 94, saying the Brose plant also would be making some automotive parts for another automotive assembly plant.

Carl declined to identify that company, saying it was not ready to announce its plans.


 

 

 

 


  
Wayne Farms LLC trimming 363 Alabama jobs
Published: Thursday, November 17, 2011, 1:07 PM     Updated: Thursday, November 17, 2011, 1:13 PM  
BIRMINGHAM, Alabama -- Wayne Farms LLC has informed Alabama officials that it plans to cut 363 jobs in Decatur.

The company cited the number in a filing with the Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs, which said the move would be complete by Jan. 16. In a press release, Wayne Farms said it said it is streamlining operations in Decatur, where it has a complex of plants.

The company said it is making to move to remain competitive, according to The Decatur Daily and Huntsville Times.

"We've made a significant investment in North Alabama over the years, and our Decatur operation and workforce are key to our future growth," CEO Elton Maddox said in a statement. "We remain committed to Decatur and look forward to the future growth this change will bring to our company and the area."
 
Oakwood, Ga.-based Wayne Farms has nearly 1,800 employees in Decatur, according to its web site. It has other Alabama plants in Albertville, Enterprise and Union Springs.

 

 

 

 

 


  
 

 

Job Description 

 


 

 

 

Trade Restructuring in Century's First Decade Will Affect International Economy in the Next
 

The Chinese global share of manufactured exports soared from 7% in 2000 to 20% in 2010, while the U.S. share declined from 19% to 13%. The Japanese share dropped from 13% to 9% while the European Union share held steady at 20%.

  

The reversal in the global share of trade between China and the United States, particularly in manufacturing, will have a decisive impact on economic relationships among the principal economic powers and on the international economic system, according to a new Manufacturers Alliance/MAPI report, "In A Decade of Transformation in World Trade."

 

The Chinese global share of manufactured exports soared from 7% in 2000 to 20% in 2010, while the U.S. share declined from 19% to 13%. The Japanese share dropped from 13% to 9% while the European Union share held steady at 20%.

A disturbing trend in the dominant manufacturing sector was the growth of trade imbalances, MAPI notes. China's surplus increased more than tenfold, from $50 billion in 2000 to $582 billion in 2010, in stark contrast to the United States deficit, which increased from $319 billion to $425 billion.

Preeg argues that the harm of the very large and growing U.S. trade deficit in manufactures is a net decline in U.S. production and relatively high-paying jobs.

"A $1 billion trade deficit, based on value-added per worker, is equated to a loss of 4,000 to 10,000 jobs," said Ernest H. Preeg, MAPI Senior Advisor for International Trade and Finance. "Thus, the $80 billion increase in the deficit in 2010 meant a loss of 320,000 to 800,000 jobs, and the projected $50 billion increase in the deficit in 2011 (from $425 billion to $475 billion) means an additional loss of 200,000 to 500,000 jobs."

 

more...

Industry Week

 

 





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Wendy Wallace Johnson
 
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