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FOOD FOR THOUGHT 

DECEMBER 2011 

Greetings!   

 

We hope you enjoy your holiday season, whether it is Christmas, Hanukkah, time with family, time to reflect, or cleaning out your email inbox.  We are now in our second year as a Food Innovation Center, and we are pleased to say this organization is  composed of compassionate, talented scholars and professionals focused on improving lives with food.  The future remains bright for our center and for society's global food outlook with your help.
 
Best wishes,
 
Ken Lee, Steven Clinton, Mark Failla, Michael Leiblein, and Steven Schwartz (FIC directors)
 
Carolee Barber, Alex Barkley, Meg Dick, and Kayla Stucke (FIC staff)
 
 
 
NEW RFP: FIC INNOVATION INITIATIVES
The FIC Innovation Initiatives will support multi-college teams in new collaborative research projects. Proposals that address significant problems in food quality, local food security, the food industry, or obesity are welcome. We look forward to your innovative ideas.
  • Application deadline: February 21, 2012, by 5 PM
  • Funds available: April 5, 2012
  • Budget: Up to $50,000 in direct costs for one year per award. Up to $200,000 may be invested among four awards.
  • Review the RFP at http://fic.osu.edu/funding/initiatives.html for details 

 

E-NEWSLETTER ARCHIVE

 

Click here to view past editions of the FIC e-newsletter!

IN THIS ISSUE
NEW RFP: FIC INNOVATION INITIATIVES
MEMBER SPOTLIGHT
EXTRAMURAL FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES
FIC MEMBERS IN THE NEWS

DID YOU KNOW?

In 2011, FIC awarded $246,814 to center members through competitive peer-reviewed funding programs. These 18 investments link investigators across campus in pursuit of multidisciplinary food solutions. 

MEMBER SPOTLIGHT 

  Earl Harrison   

Earl Harrison on the front lines of Vitamin A research. Find out more...
 

JOIN OUR
MAILING LIST

EXTRAMURAL FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES

Young Investigator Grant for Probiotics 

Amount of Awards: Two grants of $50,000
Deadline: Feb 15, 2012
Summary: To contribute to the advancement of probiotics and gastrointestinal microbiota research in the United States and to impact academic and career development of young investigators.

Link: http://www.probioticsresearch.com/ 

 

FDA Small Scientific Conference Grant Program (R13)

Range of Awards: $0 - $50,000

Deadline: Jan 15, Apr 15, July 15, Oct 15

Summary: For financial assistance in support of scientific conferences. A small scientific conference is defined as a symposium, seminar, workshop, or any formal meeting, whether conducted face-to-face or virtually to exchange information and explore a defined subject, issue, or area of concern impacting the public's health within the scope of the FDA's mission. Applicants must identify the FDA Office/Center best suited to support their proposed conference (i.e. Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, Center for Veterinary Medicine, etc.)

Link: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-11-310.html 

 

Translational Research for the Prevention and Control of Diabetes and Obesity (R18)
Range of Awards: Up to $2,500,000 over 5 years

Deadline: March 1, 2012

Summary: To test the effectiveness of interventions for the prevention and control of diabetes and obesity that have a high potential to be adopted, and sustained in applied health care settings. The approaches tested must be based on widely accepted interventions previously demonstrated to be efficacious in clinical trials. Research must target the prevention or reversal of obesity, prevention of type 2 diabetes, improved care of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, or the prevention or delay of the complications of these conditions.

Link: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-09-176.html 

 

IZUMI Foundation Grants

Range of Awards: Up to $100,000

Deadline: Continuous. LOI required.

Summary: For promising, practical innovations that reduce the burden of infectious disease while also strengthening the ability of communities to improve the health outcomes of people living in the most impoverished areas of Africa, Central America, and South America. The foundation supports projects in five areas: infectious diseases with high morbidity and mortality, neglected tropical diseases, malnutrition, maternal and neonatal health, and health care infrastructure.

Link: http://izumi.org/fundingfaq.html 

FIC MEMBERS IN THE NEWS

JEFF LEJEUNE LEADS FOOD SAFTEY STUDY WHICH IS FOCUS OF $2.3 MILLION IN GRANTS


Jeff LeJeune An Ohio State University scientist and colleagues have garnered two food safety grants totaling $2.3 million from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

The first is a $1.8 million four-year grant on "Reducing the Transmission of AMR (antimicrobial-resistant) Organisms by Wildlife within the Food Supply -- A Research, Control and Outreach Strategy." The goal is to determine the extent to which wildlife contribute to antimicrobial-resistant bacteria colonization in livestock, and how much that can spread to humans.
The problem is significant: Overall, the economic health-care burden caused by AMR bacteria is more than $4 billion annually, according to some estimates. 
 

"In this study, we're looking at food safety with a 'one-medicine' approach where you take into consideration not just animals, not just people, not just the environment, but everything that can have an effect on food safety," said Jeff LeJeune, the study's principal investigator and a microbiologist and veterinary scientist with the university's Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC) in Wooster. "What we're trying to do is identify the interface between wildlife and livestock that carry AMR strains and how they might be spread."  Read on...
 

 

GREG LESINSKI CO-LEADS STUDY WHICH DISCOVERED THAT A LOWER ANTIOXIDANT LEVEL MIGHT EXPLAIN HIGHER SKIN CANCER RATE IN MALES

 

Gregory Lesinski Men are three times more likely than women to develop a common form of skin cancer but medical science doesn't know why. A new study may provide part of the answer.

 
Researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC - James) have found that male mice had lower levels of an important skin antioxidant than female mice and higher levels of certain cancer-linked inflammatory cells.

The antioxidant, a protein called catalase, inhibits skin cancer by mopping up hydrogen peroxide and other DNA-damaging reactive-oxygen compounds that form during exposure to ultraviolet B light (UVB), a common source of sunburn and cancer-causing skin damage. Studies by others have linked low catalase activity to skin cancer progression.  Read the full article and watch the video. 

 

 

What do you want to see here?
This is your e-newsletter, so please let us know what you'd like it to contain. Want more or less of a particular type of content? Have an idea for a new segment? Email [email protected] or call Carolee at
 614-292-0229.

Food Innovation Center | The Ohio State University  

203 Bricker Hall | 190 North Oval Mall

Columbus, OH 43210-1358

p: 614-292-0229 | f: 614-292-3658 | e: [email protected] | w: http://fic.osu.edu 

Director: Ken Lee; Associate directors: Steven Clinton, Mark Failla, Michael Leiblein, and Steven Schwartz 

 

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