Collective Voice Header 1
In This Issue
IMMIGRATION BENEFITS
INTERNATIONAL WOMEN'S DAY
SEXUAL ASSAULT AWARENESS MONTH
LANGUAGE ACCESS
LOBBY DAY
PEACE IN THE HOME HELPLINE
ADVOCACY SPOTLIGHT
LANGUAGE LEARNING PROGRAMS
MAY EVENTS
Dear Crossing Borders Advocates,

 
Welcome to the sixth issue of COLLECTIVE VOICE,
Immigration News You Can Use
!

 

 

IMMIGRATION BENEFITS FOR JAPANESE NATIONALS IMPACTED BY RECENT DISASTER: QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

 

US Immigration Logo

INTERNATIONAL WOMEN'S DAY

 

We hope you had a happy International Women's Day!  March 8th is a global day celebrating the economic, political and social achievements of women past, present and future.  In some places like China, Russia, Vietnam and Bulgaria, International Women's Day is a national holiday.

 

In Washington State, Crossing Borders Advocates gathered in Wenatchee, WA to learn the Advocacy Learning Center concepts as they apply domestic and sexual violence issues impacting Latina Farmworkers.  We are thankful for our time together, our advocacy opportunities, and the mujeres who do the work to get food to our tables every day.

 

 

 

Want to know more about International Women's Day?

APRIL IS SEXUAL ASSAULT AWARENESS MONTH!

 

It is time to:

Break with the rape culture.

Stop blaming the victim.

Stop street harassment.

Protect immigrant victims.

Protect inmates from sexual violence.

Put an end to sexual hate crimes.

 

For more information about multi-lingual efforts in WA State, see WCSAP's "Be the Solution" Postcard Campaign and Arte Sana's SAAPM Toolkit

 

Ya es hora de 

LANGUAGE ACCESS

 

Another important memo from the Department of Justice on Language Access. 

 

APIDV Logo 

 

Click Here

LOBBY DAY

 

We loved seeing Crossing Borders advocates at the WSCADV Lobby Day!!

 

CB Lobby Day 

 

"Like" us to see the photos and legislative updates on the new WSCADV Facebook page!

Facebook

PEACE IN THE HOME HELPLINE

 

Seattle.gov
The "Peace in the Home" helpline offers assistance in 14 languages:  Amharic or Amaryna, Chinese, Japanese, Khmer, Lao, Russian, Romanian, Somali, Spanish, Tagalog, Thai, Tigrinya, Ukrainian, and Vietnamese.  The helpline offers one-call access that connects non- and limited-English speaking domestic violence victims to a community-based agency that can serve their language and service needs.  For additional languages or for more information, contact seattle.gov or visit their website.

ADVOCACY SPOTLIGHT

 

How do we end violence?
  
By listening to survivors
By learning from them
By teaching others what we have learned
  
What is a way that we teach and learn?  By sending WSCADV ANYTHING ON ADVOCACY that helps you do great dv/sa advocacy for immigrant and refugee survivors.  We will share some of these submissions with advocates all over the world through the Crossing Borders webpage that we are developing RIGHT now!
  
Examples could be:
  • Outreach materials
  • Articles
  • Language access signs or handouts
  • Scripts
  • Local news on immigrants in your town
  • Organizational policies or procedures
  • Curriculum
  • PSA's
  • Video's
  • Links to webpages, youtube pages, etc.

Also, if you can help us with the design and inspiration, please send us:

  • Photos
  • Art projects
  • Quotes
  • Stories

As busy as you are, don't forget to teach others what you have learned.  That is the only way we can advance our movement to end violence!

 

When submitting your information, you are giving us full permission to post them online.  Add any credits you want to your submissions.  Email us with your full name.

PARTNERING WITH LANGUAGE LEARNING PROGRAMS

 

When I went to volunteer in supporting English Language Learners, the literacy organization asked me why I wanted to volunteer.  I was caught off guard because I really hadn't thought it out in a summarized answer.  I remembered the women I had advocated with in shelters and in outreach work.  As I flipped through my own advocacy memories, and the real women attached to them, I remembered how the loss of language through immigrating impacted people's ability to be safe and happy.
  
As advocates, we push for law enforcement, courts and schools to provide interpreters, translations and bi-lingual staffing.  But, we can also be helpful in assuring that people who want to learn English have places to go to do so.
  
Think about it for a minute...As if the culture shock of moving to a new country is not enough, trying to figure out the price per pound at a grocery store in another language or get correct change back is stressful.  In fact, everything we do becomes so much more complicated when we do not know the language being used.  Add to that the shift of the family dynamics that can happen.  Women who work in the home may become isolated within their own families when children learn English in school and husbands learn English at work.
  
Access to ESL or ELL classes can be conected to women's liberation, and without them, women may be more vulnerable to violence.  Domestic violence programs across WA State are finding ways to keep building on relationships with ESL or ELL learners.  To learn more, contact your fellow advocates at the following programs:
  
  
 Tacoma Community House
  
  
Skamania DVSAS
  

Yakima YWCA Logo  

MAY EVENTS

 

Immigrant Advocacy Institute
For Advocates, Managers and Immigrant Leaders
May 24, 2011 in SeaTac
  
More Information               Register Online
  
  
Support Group Facilitator Training
May 25, 2011 in SeaTac
  
More Information              Register Online
If this email was forwarded to you and you want to subscribe, email summer@wscadv.org and we'll add you to the list.
Summer Carrick, Crossing Borders Project Coordinator
summer@wscadv.org   360-586-1022 x306

Gabriela Alor, Crossing Borders Project Specialist
gabriela@wscadv.org   206-389-2515 x201