Sustainable Times Newsletter                                                                                                           Summer 2011
SCUNY
The City University of New York plays a transformational role in our country's sustainable future with an educational footprint that spans 23 academic institutions and over half a million students, faculty and staff. 
CUNY Campus map
solar liberty small squared
Manhattan trimmed square

energynewsSustainable Energy

 

 NYC Solar Map Reaps World-Wide Interest  

 Under the Hood of the NYC Solar Map Project

 NYC's Solar Energy Future 

 Community Solar for NYC 

 Expanding the Solar Thermal Market in NYC 

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Sworksnews CUNY SustainableWorks

 

 The NYCleantech Collaborative: Building NYC's Cleantech Market

 Designing an Intelligent Commercialization Center

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scunyprojectnews CUNY Sustainability Project

 

 CUNY Sustainability Making Progress on all Fronts 

 CUNY College Trio Make the Princeton Green Grade Again

 CCNY Students Build Solar House for Urban Environment 

 CCNY Sustainability Program Wins Green Infrastructure Grant 

 QC Awarded DEP Green Grant Towards Reducing Toxins in Flushing Creek 

 Brooklyn College: Natural and Social Scientists Team Up on New Courses 

 Kingsborough Community College Hosts Award Winning Eco-Festival 

 LaGuardia Community College: Choose Reusable Water Bottles 

 LaGuardia Community College: Go Meatless Mondays 

 College of Staten Island Saving Big Bucks Thanks to N.Y. Power Authority 

 College of Staten Island Ranks 6th in National Recyclemania Contest 

 York Continues Green Movement 

 Student Opportunity: EPA OnCampus ecoAmbassadors 

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Sustainable Energy

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NYCsolarmap 

NYC Solar Map Reaps World-Wide Interest

 

mapscreenshotlandingIn today's technology driven world where consumers have grown accustom to data at their fingertips, the NYC Solar Map has garnered attention around the globe since its launch on June 16th at CUNY's 5th annual Solar Summit . The City University of New York, (CUNY) created and built the map through Sustainable CUNY as part of the NYC Solar America City Partnership and offers this uniquely accurate tool to the public with a goal of helping NYC transition to cleaner energy.

 

The NYC Solar Map is an interactive online map that allows users to estimate the solar energy potential for every building in New York City's five boroughs by simply inputting an address. That amounts to almost one million buildings.  

 

mapscreenshot2Not only is the map educational and cool to play with, it is an eye opener. With nearly 100,000 hits already, even those who had never even thought about solar before are curious to see how much solar power could be produced on their roof. 

 

The map also highlights existing solar installations, displays real-time solar energy production, and shows the user the costs, incentives, and payback period for investing in solar.  

mapscreenshot4Reporters from media outlets such as CNN Money, New York Times and Reuters immediately typed in local addresses while researching the map story and were collectively surprised at how short the payback time is for installing solar on most buildings. Many map visitors are already taking the next step by filling out a solar inquiry form , and while others may decide to wait and see, their tipping point is likely to draw nearer every time the price of energy goes up.

 

Mapscreenshot3The map was developed as a collaborative effort and was built by the Center for Analysis and Research of Spatial Information (C.A.R.S.I.) at CUNY's Hunter College with extensive assistance from Con Edison and the High Performance Computing Center at CUNY's College of Staten Island and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The NYC Solar America City Partnership, a U.S. Department of Energy supported program, is a prime example of how CUNY is utilizing its resources to facilitate the change to cleaner energy and streamline the path to the marketplace for solar and other clean technologies. 

 

An Energy Map for NYC

 

The map serves as a key foundation for building a new clean energy infrastructure for New York City and can be utilized as a platform for the development and placement of clean technologies in New York City. Initially utilized for solar technology, the map will enable NYC to transition to cleaner energy by allowing online users to access the data, analytics, drawing tools and even the financial information that can assist them in planning where to strategically place new technology. Sustainable CUNY's work to deploy solar in NYC is ongoing. As lead in the NYC Solar America City Partnership, comprised of CUNY, the Mayor's Office of Long Term Planning and Sustainability and the NYC EDC, the Partnership is working on programs such as Community Solar, creating a Solar Thermal plan, and '100 Days of Solar'. News Index 

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underthehood
Under the Hood of the NYC Solar Map Project
By Hunter College C.A.R.S.I Director Sean Ahearn                                                             


Solar power is all about the sun's energy and how much is hitting the surface of the earth or a building roof, often referred to as solar insolation (W/m2).  The amount hitting a building roof will be influenced by the shading from surrounding buildings, the time of day, the time of year and the weather conditions. The challenge is to incorporate all of these factors into a model that enabled the team at CUNY's Center for Advanced Research of Spatial Information (CARSI) to calculate how much power will be generated by a given square meter of the City's surface. 

 

Sean LidarThe first step to accomplish this task is to create a detailed 3-D model for the entire City of New York. We employed LiDAR or Light imaging Detection and Radar to create this model. LiDAR is an instrument that is mounted on a plane and fires over 50,000 pulses of Laser energy per second and measures the time it takes to receive each one of those pulses. Because we know where the plane is when each pulse is fired using Global Positioning Systems (GPS), the tilt of the aircraft from a device called an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), the angle we fired the pulse and the speed of light; we can calculate an exact geographic coordinate (X, Y, & Z) from each pulse.   And these points are accurate to within 7.5 cm, about the height of a coffee cup! For New York City we collected over 15 billion points. You can think of it as "shrink-wrapping" the city in a blanket of points to create a surface. 

Carsi 15 billion

From this surface we then calculated the height of every square meter, all 900,000 of them, to form a continuous digital surface model. Now we can use a model that calculates how much energy hits each square meter of the City surface every daylight hour of every day of the year, taking into account the shadowing from surrounding buildings or trees. The model we used is an ESRI extension that we ran on a super computer with 24 processors for about a week. Next we have to modify our solar insolation values based on something called a "typical meteorological year". For our case we used a location in Central Park that has been measured for over 20 years. So now we have taken weather into account. 

 

To further calibrate the model we tested it by comparing it to a set of measurement sites with instruments (pyronometers) that can calculate solar insolation. Now we have calibrated our model with known sites and have the solar insolation for every square meter of New York City. Since we are focusing on roof tops we need to find enough contiguous square meters that have the right size and shape to accommodate a Photovoltaic system (PV). Here we run a very sophisticated algorithm to find areas on a building top that have this characteristic. It can be a flat surface or a tilted surface as long as it is on a single plane. Now we have computed the size and shape of the PV system that can fit on every roof in New York City!   This is plugged into our "Solar Calculator" that give us the cost of the PV system, the length of time before we have paid it off due to lower electric costs and cumulative savings over the years.   

 

What's left? All of this is driven by a geographic data base that feeds into the "front end" of the Solar New York application that enables the user to interact with all of this data!   This is another big story but the best way to understand what we did is to go to nycsolarmap.com and explore! News Index 

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Futureofsolar 

NYC's Solar Energy Future

 

Recently, Sustainable CUNY, on behalf of the New York City Solar America City Partnership, published the 2011 update to  NYC's Solar Energy Future .The report details the progress of the solar program in NYC and projects 45 to 70 MW of solar installed by 2015 given current policies and incentives.The original program goal was 8.1 MW by 2015, a mark that will clearly be surpassed in the very near future. ( Con Edison: Solar Doubles in 2010 ) The next big thrust for the NYC Solar America City Partnership is also part of the federal government's focus on mainstreaming solar energy through the 'Sunshot Initiative'. Announced in February of 2011 by U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, the DOE SunShot Initiative is a collaborative national initiative to make solar energy technologies cost-competitive with other forms of energy by reducing the cost of solar energy systems by about 75% before 2020. Reducing the total installed cost for utility-scale solar electricity to roughly 6 cents per kilowatt hour without subsidies will result in rapid, large-scale adoption of solar electricity across the United States. Reaching this goal will re-establish American technological leadership, improve the nation's energy security, and strengthen U.S. economic competitiveness in the global clean energy race. As the cost of solar modules continue to drop (see chart below), the NYC partnership is addressing the 'Balance of System Costs' or the 'soft costs' associated with installing solar in NYC such as permitting, interconnecting, codes, policy and regulatory standards- all barrier identified early on in CUNY's original report.

  

A Suite of Solar Tools

 

The NYC Solar Map is a powerful tool that can help New Yorkers see the value of placing solar on their rooftops and help City and utility planners design where to strategically integrate renewable MW's into the grid- and there are more tools to come. The partnership is working with lead agencies on the 'Balance of System' costs through programs such as '100 Days of Solar' and has worked with Con Edison to create a prototype of an 'Integrated Permit Tracking Portal' which will track applications across multiple agencies and ease the permitting process. In addition, Sustainable CUNY is in the process of drafting a 'NYC Solar Guide' which is designed to be an online platform to walk you down a customized permitting pathway based on your unique zoning and permitting requirements. NYC Solar Ombudsmen have also worked with City agencies on a report analyzing the NYC mechanical code and how to best address code issues and technical questions around solar.  

 

All of this work continues CUNY's collaborative effort across agencies, utilities, industry and solar installers with a goal of creating a clean energy market, new green jobs and reliable clean power for New York City. News Index 

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communitysolar
Community Solar for New York City

 

Community Solar programs can help NYC residents and businesses who don't own their own building or whose roofs are not otherwise candidates 'go solar'. With two million rental households in New York City (66% of total households), new models of ownership are necessary to make solar accessible to everyone. Over the past 6 months, the NYC Solar America City Partnership has been working to lay out a pathway for implementing community solar initiatives that fit New York City's political, regulatory, and economic context. The potential community solar models investigated during the community solar model include:

 

An NYC Solar Development Fund would be dedicated to the development of solar facilities on non-profit and community centers in New York City. It would provide community members with opportunities to make tax-deductible donations in support of solar installations on facilities that serve community uses - such as churches, schools, shelters, and community recreation centers.

 

The NYC Solar Power Access Initiative would develop a pathway for master and sub-metered tenants, in collaboration with their landlords, to access the energy benefits of on-site solar installations. This would vastly increase the ability of residents and businesses in New York City, who would not otherwise have the ability to install on-site solar, to realize the energy benefits of solar.

 

The NYC Community Solar Investment Initiative could be a long-term strategic option that explores how residents and businesses can successfully collaborate to create solar investment vehicles. Building on the lessons learned from other communities, the NYC Solar America City partnership will consider how it could assist stakeholders create solar Limited Liability Companies (LLCs) to enable local individuals to invest in community solar projects.

 

Look for updates on these activities in the coming months or email nycsolarcity@mail.cuny.edu 

News Index 

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solarthermal  

Expanding the Solar Thermal Market in NYC

 

Worldwide, 42 million solar thermal systems have been installed. However, the U.S. lags far behind Europe and China in our adoption of this mature, tested technology. Though there are only a few installations in NYC, solar thermal has huge potential to reduce green house gas emissions and save energy and money. Building on the work completed in 2009 for the New York State Solar Thermal Roadmap, Sustainable CUNY will be leading an initiative to coordinate existing efforts across the city and establish a plan for future growth of a solar thermal market in the city.

 

Following the same successful strategy utilized for solar electric, the Solar America City Partnership will compile a base of knowledge about the local market, and then bring together a group of stakeholders to explore strategies to remove barriers to market expansion and leverage opportunities for growth. Affordable housing developers in NYC are already experimenting with solar thermal and CUNY's Solar Installer Roundtable will be creating a subcommittee to take a concentrated look at solar thermal permitting issues. This collaborative effort addresses many existing issues across the city including the burning of dirty #4 and #6 heating oils that coincides closely with the worst air pollution in the city, creating public health hazards and environmental justice issues. Sustainable CUNY's work will leverage existing efforts to switch out old heating equipment to create opportunities to integrate solar thermal.

 

The NYC Solar America City's solar thermal initiative will provide a framework for future development of reports, white papers, and action plans. Most importantly, this work will illuminate clear opportunities for industry to address critical needs within the city and act as a platform for building relationships. With broad support from stakeholders, this work will lay down a clear path towards building a vibrant solar thermal market in NYC. News Index 

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CUNY SustainableWorks  

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NYCC 

The NYCleantech Collaborative: Building NYC's Cleantech Market

 

CUNY SustainableWorks has formed the NYCleantech Collaborative (NYCC), a membership organization that has already attracted industry leaders who aim to ramp up the NYC cleantech market through the commercialization of flagship projects. CUNY SustainableWorks is a cleantech-focused commercialization program of the CUNY Economic Development Corporation.

 

The primary goal of the NYCC is to create a collaborative environment where NYC's cleantech stakeholders across government agencies, utilities, unions, industry and academia can work together to accelerate the adoption of promising cleantech products and services in NYC and other urban centers. The NYCC will engage its members in targeted, project-based, initiatives that seek to: 

  • Analyze technological barriers to cleantech commercialization 
  • Identify opportunities for policy, regulatory, or other solutions 
  • Create and implement technology roadmaps for specific cleantech commercialization
Sworks Collab Center

CUNY SustainableWorks Collaboration Center

 

The NYCC kickoff meeting will be in the Fall of 2011 at the CUNY SustainableWorks Collaboration Center in Manhattan. The Sustainable CUNY team and primary members will outline the initial action-plan for NYCC, and seek to identify and prioritize commercialization-ready technologies for the NYCC to focus its efforts on. 

 

To join NYCC, or for more information , please email sustainable@mail.cuny.edu, subject line: NYCleantech Collaborative.  News Index

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 designsurvey 

Designing an Intelligent Commercialization Center

 

A survey conducted by CUNY SustainableWorks of cleantech industry leaders in New York placed significant importance on the need for flexible space in New York City to showcase and demonstrate new technology. Just as important is the need to test how these new innovations interact with other new technology, existing systems and the grid. 

 

BCC SiteCUNY is in the design phase of building the CUNY SustainableWorks Commerilization Center on the historic Bronx Community College Campus. CUNY SustainbleWorks, a commercilization program for cleantech, conducted the survey in order to design an intelligent facility that best meets the needs of the rapidly growing cleantech industry. NYC has the largest commercial office market in the U.S. consisting of 439.5M square feet (≈3.5 times larger than the next largest market) and among the highest electricity costs in the country. The market for cleantech should be larger in NYC than anywhere else in America; however, the market potential for these technologies remains an unrealized opportunity due to a disjointed commercialization process. The survey, conducted in the spring, addressed both building and program needs.

Survey response-program

Sustainable CUNY has led the U.S. DOE Solar America City partnership since 2007 and launched CUNY SustainableWorks to help accelerate needed clean and sustainable technologies and services into the New York City marketplace. The program is administered through the CUNY Economic Development Corporation and is headquartered at the CUNY SustainableWorks Collaboration Center at 75 Park Place in Manhattan. Contact CUNY SustainableWorks for more information. News Index 

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CUNY Sustainability Project

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CUNYoverview
CUNY Sustainability Making Progress on all Fronts

 

In 2007, CUNY signed on to Mayor Bloomberg's '30 in 10 University Challenge', committing the University to a 30% reduction in its greenhouse gas emissions by 2017. More than three years into the project, CUNY has already reduced its emissions by 19%, more than half way to its goal thanks to a broad network of CUNY staff focused on the project.

 

In addition, the challenge has prompted the university and its 19 campuses to set over 800 goals for itself aimed at minimizing CUNY's impact on the environment. These goals range from initiatives to improve recycling & waste management to increasing environmentally preferable purchasing; from energy & water conservation measures to influencing commuting behavior; from raising student awareness to increasing the number of opportunities to learn about sustainability in the classroom. For example, there are now over 100 'green workforce' continuing education classes offered at CUNY and the number of degree programs relating to sustainability is set to triple from ten to thirty by 2017. Recycling volumes have improved over 24% in the last three years, overall waste volumes have fallen 9% in the same period, there has been an 80% switch to recycled content paper and approximately 40% of office equipment is now powered down remotely when not in use.

 

Clean technology is also being piloted at CUNY's various campuses, including solar window film to reduce space cooling loads, smart strips to impact plug loads, daylight sensor controlled lighting and LED lighting changeovers to lower electricity usage, virtual servers and cloud computing technologies to reduce data center energy use, solar-powered compactor waste bins, solar-powered automatic faucets and enterprise software which helps track and reduce desktop printing. News Index 

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Princeton
CUNY College Trio Make the Princeton Green Grade Again

 

Three of CUNY's senior colleges - Brooklyn College, Hunter College & the City College of New York - have once again been named among North America's greenest higher education institutions, in the second annual edition of the Princeton Review's 'Guide to Green Colleges.' All three colleges were featured in the first ever 'green guide', published last year, and despite stiffer competition and more challenging criteria, were among the 311 colleges to make it onto this year's list.

 

The guide evaluated hundreds of applicant colleges on over 50 sustainability criteria, featuring those colleges which 'demonstrate notable commitments to sustainability in their academic offerings, campus infrastructure, activities and career preparation.' Key facts and figures about each colleges environmental and sustainable initiatives are featured in the guide.

 

A 2011 survey by the Princeton Review found that 69% of students would be influenced in their choice of school by a college's commitment to the environment. The guide is produced in collaboration with the US Green Building Council, the same organization which developed and oversees the LEED green building certification program. News Index 

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CCNYPOD  

CCNY Students Build Solar House for Urban Environment 

Solar Pod Students
CCNY Students Build Solar Pod
More than 100 students from the Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture and Grove School of Engineering are representing The City College of New York in the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon.  Competing as Team New York, their project, the 746-square foot Solar Roof Pod, is the only one of 20 entries in the competition designed for high-density urban environments. Watch 

 

Rooftops of city buildings are largely underutilized, yet they offer true potential as living spaces because of their direct access to sun, wind and water.  Designed for flat rooftops of existing mid-rise residential or commercial buildings, the Solar Roof Pod enables eco-conscious urban dwellers to live sustainably.  They will be able to cost-effectively collect and provide solar power, cultivate roof gardens and recycle storm water. Its modular, flexible penthouse design uses lightweight, durable, renewable materials and smartly integrates photovoltaic technologies and high-efficiency lighting.  Innovative solar thermal collectors supply clean energy for hot water, heating and cooling.  The building-block assembly system enables each pod to be transported to rooftops via staircases, freight elevators or cranes.

 

Students are working feverishly over the summer at a rooftop construction site on the plaza level of CCNY's Marshak Science Center to complete the structure.  In September, it will be will be transported to Washington, D.C., where Team New York will reassemble, operate and open it to visitors on the National Mall for judging in the ten categories of the Solar Decathlon.

 

By working on the project, students also learn skills not taught in the classroom or studio. "We're learning a lot more about building a house than you could from a text book," said architecture student Farah Ahmad. "(Construction) requires a lot of coordination because one mistake could mess up everything." News Index 

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CCNYgrant
CCNY Sustainability Program Wins Green Infrastructure Grant

 

The City College of New York's interdisciplinary Sustainability in the Urban Environment master's program has successfully partnered with New York Restoration Project and Stantec Consulting on a $244,920 New York Department of Environmental Protection 2011 Green Infrastructure Grant.

 

The project is located in the Carroll Street Community Garden in the Park Slope section of Brooklyn.  New York Restoration Project will install a right-of-way bioswale that will divert storm water flow from the street into a rain garden that will feature native plants and trees.  A small education station will be built on the site, as well.  It will function as a remote weather monitoring station and outdoor classroom hub. CCNY's share of the grant will be used to oversee a monitoring program that is part of the project.  A team of graduate students in the sustainability program will work on this project to fulfill their requirements for the capstone interdisciplinary project, which is a required yearlong, six-credit course.

 

Dr. Latif M. Jiji, Herbert Keyser Professor in CCNY's Grove School of Engineering, director of the sustainability program and principal investigator on the grant for CCNY called the partnership "an important recognition that we have an effective approach to training sustainability professionals for the 21st century." The NYC DEP Grant Program provides funding for green infrastructure projects that reduce combined sewer overflows and improve water quality in New York Harbor.  The Carroll Street project will manage approximately 130,000 gallons of storm water per year and reduce combined sewer overflow into the Gowanus Canal. News Index 

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Queenscollege  

QC Awarded DEP Green Grant Towards Reducing Toxins in Flushing Creek

 Restores Apple Orchard Original to Campus Under Million Trees Initiative

 

There's "Being Green" as an "eco" theme and then there's being green--and the beautiful, 77-acre park-like Queens College campus can attest to being both. With a new Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) grant in the works and over 140 trees planted on campus over the last few semesters, the college is moving forward with initiatives designed to enhance the campus environmentally and aesthetically.

As one of 15 awardees in the Department of Environmental Protection 2011 Green Infrastructure Grant Program, the college plans to implement a system of rain gardens and permeable pavers in three campus locations to help reduce campus rainwater run-off. The resulting decrease in combined sewer overflow will help reduce toxins and improve the water quality in nearby Flushing Creek. The rain gardens will consist of open expanses of vegetation that prepare the soil to absorb water in a more efficient manner. Pavers with gravel-filled joints that absorb and filter water will absorb 100% of rainwater for--in one case--an 11,424 square-foot plaza behind the main administrative building, Kiely Hall.

Apple Orchard old 

In addition, over 140 trees have been planted on campus in the last few semesters as part of Mayor Bloomberg's Million Trees initiative, some of which have been used to resurrect an apple orchard that once graced the then-new Queens College campus in 1937. These trees were selected to achieve maximum color and symmetry in the new orchard, a gathering spot for students then and now.  

 

QC Apple Orchard

Photo Credit Nancy Bareis


Up to another 45 trees are scheduled to be planted campus-wide this fall. As a bit of an added recycling bonus, the white woven fence in the current orchard photo was a temporary installation created from plastic bags by sculptor Antonia Perez, who reconstructs barriers and divisions of personal space through everyday materials. News Index

 

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Brooklyncollege
Natural and Social Scientists Team Up on New Urban Sustainability Courses

At Brooklyn College, faculty in the Departments of Earth & Environmental Sciences, Economics, and Sociology have developed two new courses to respond to student interest in Urban Sustainability. The courses, Introduction to Urban Sustainability and Theories in Urban Sustainability, will be team taught by three faculty: an environmental scientist, an economist, and a sociologist. The team teaching approach highlights the intellectual design of the courses. True sustainability has three elements: environmental, economic, and social. Each of these need to be understood in a disciplinary fashion so that the trade-offs between the three elements of sustainability can be better understood. The courses will focus on concrete sustainability issues in Brooklyn, including topics such as green roofs, bike lanes, community gardens, brownfield redevelopment, park access, affordable housing, environmental justice, and air and water quality. Field trips are an integral part of the courses. Students will learn how to problem solve, analyze data, work in groups, and communicate across disciplines. The courses can be taken for credit in either Earth and Environmental Sciences, Economics, or Sociology. News Index

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KBCC  

Kingsborough Community College Hosts Award Winning Eco-Festival

 

Kingsborough Community College (KCC), Brooklyn's only community college, hosted its sixth annual Eco-Festival, April 13-15, 2011. The theme was "Sustaining Waters." The three-day event was free and open to the public. Eco-Festival, the winner of the 2008 CUNY Sustainability Award for environmental education and advocacy, is designed to provide a unique opportunity for students, faculty, staff and members of the Brooklyn community to gather, under a common banner, and engage in a dialogue centered on environmental problems and challenges faced globally at the dawn of the twenty-first century. The well-attended Eco-Festival was held in the college's Performing Arts Center and other near-by locations.  

 

"We are pleased that our sixth Eco-Festival at KCC was an amazing success. It, again, was a wonderful opportunity to increase public awareness and inspire meaningful action regarding the serious environmental problems we face as a society," said Dr. Regina Peruggi, president of KCC. "The environmentally centered dialogue among students, faculty, environmental experts and members of the community is fundamental to changing our environmental course."

 

Carl Safina
Carl Safina

The keynote speakers for the opening session were Carl Safina, president and co-founder of the Blue Ocean Institute and author of several writings on marine ecology and the ocean, including the award winning Song for the Blue Ocean (1998) and Eye of the Albatross (2002), and Leonardo Viana, deputy director, Marine Debris Program, Ocean Conservancy. A specially designed program by the KCC Marine Technology Program for high school students on Friday, April 15, was focused on "The Gulf Oil Spill: A year Later," with Thomas Bronson of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration as the keynote speaker. The goals of Eco-Festival are to raise ecological literacy, foster global citizenship, promote meaningful dialogue about environmental issues and inspire environmental action and stewardship. The 2011 Eco-Festival was sponsored, in part, by Con Edison, National Grid and The New York Times. News Index

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lagccwater
LaGuardia Community College: Choose Reusable Water Bottles

By Anthony N. Lugo, Director, Campus Auxiliary Services & Sustainability

 

Now you can fill up your water bottle at the new "water bottle filling station" along the hall of flags, across from the Offices of Student Life at LaGuardia Community College. The filling station is situated over an existing water fountain. Simply place your water bottle on the mini platform and push the button on top. It's quick, easy, and more importantly, good for the environment.  

 

The manufacturing and transporting of plastic, disposable bottled water contributes to greenhouse gases and isn't sustainable. When you factor in the average person's bottled water a day buying habit, the impact on the environment only worsens. It's estimated that 50 billion water bottles end up in landfills each year. The filling station is consistent with the Sustainability Council's efforts to raise awareness and reduce the College's carbon footprint. The goal isn't to ban bottled water on campus or limit options for our students, faculty and staff, rather make reusable bottles the eco-friendly choice. 

     

At this past Green Week, members from the Sustainability Council along with students from the Campus Improvement Association and Environmental Club gave away 250 water bottles with 'Choose to Reuse' printed on them. The Sustainability Council plans to install additional water bottle filling stations on campus. Choose to reuse. News Index 

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lagccmeatless
Go Meatless Mondays

Anthony N. Lugo, Director Campus Auxiliary Services & Sustainability

 

Did you know that sustainability also involves nutrition?! Sustainability encompasses many elements, principles and practices. A person can be sustainable by reducing the levels of energy and water they use, utilizing more public transportation, recycling the likes of aluminum foil even curbing the amount of meat in their diets. In an effort to promote sustainability and improve the health and eating habits of students, faculty and staff, the LaGuardia Sustainability Council is proud to announce that our dining services, MBJ, is now offering Meatless Monday specials in our cafeterias. Options include 3 bean salad, Eggplant Parmesan, Tomato/Mozzarella/Portobello Mushroom Napoleon with balsamic glaze and Cous Cous salad with more choices to follow.

 

Eliminating meat from your diet once a week can go a long way. It not only reduces your risk of chronic preventable conditions like cardiovascular disease, diabetes and obesity but also reduces your carbon footprint - saving precious resources like fresh water and fossil fuels that would otherwise be used in the production of meat. The production of meat contributes to pesticide pollution, water pollution, greenhouse gas emissions and rain forest degradation.

 

LaGuardia now joins the over 40 colleges and universities nationwide who have joined the Meatless Monday international movement. Meatless Mondays, a non-profit initiative of the Monday Campaigns, in partnership with the John Hopkins' Bloomberg School of Public Health, is designed to improve the health of citizens and our planet by encouraging people to consume less meat in a conscientious and measurable way. The goal is to get people to reduce meat consumption by 15%.  To learn more about the movement, including meatless recipes you can make at home, please visit Meatless Monday .While you're there, why not pledge to go meatless one day a week!?!?! News Index 

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CSI

College of Staten Island Saving Big Bucks Thanks to N.Y. Power Authority

 

New York Power Authority (NYPA) President and Chief Executive Officer Richard M. Kessel and College of Staten Island (CSI) President Tomas D. Morales announced on June 22, 2011, that a major new energy efficiency project at the college's Biological Sciences/Chemical Sciences Building is enhancing comfort levels while lowering electricity and fuel costs by more than $900,000 a year.  The improvements are also expected to result in the annual reduction of carbon dioxide emissions-the primary climate-changing greenhouse gas in the atmosphere-by 4,110 tons. The $19.8 million energy-saving project, which began in September 2009 at the CSI sciences building included upgrading the heating, ventilating and air-conditioning systems (HVAC), occupancy-sensor installations and new roofing.  The location, also known as Building 6S, includes nine teaching laboratories, research facilities and centers for environmental and neuroscience. 


"The newly completed project at the College of Staten Island demonstrates that well designed energy efficiency upgrades are often synonymous with significant utility bill savings, providing strong impetus for investing in the latest technologies," Kessel said. "The Power Authority is committed to advancing Governor Cuomo's Power NY agenda, including redoubling our efforts to increase energy efficiency throughout the state and thereby helping to reduce energy costs and create jobs and economic growth."

 

"I want to thank the New York Power Authority for spearheading the energy-efficiency upgrades at our Building 6S laboratory and classroom complex," Morales said. "Along with addressing ventilating and lighting deficiencies, the initiative will make a significant difference in helping us manage the building's energy costs, with the improvements corresponding with what you'd expect at an ultramodern science facility."

 

The energy efficiency project at CSI will provide an estimated annual electricity savings of more than $217,000 and annual fuel savings of nearly $686,000.  The upgrades were among the measures identified in a comprehensive campus-wide energy plan that NYPA undertook for optimizing CSI's clean energy usage as well as water management and sustainability practices for other key resources. The energy-efficiency project at CSI stemmed from the Power Authority's Energy Cost Reduction program, under which NYPA has carried out efficiency upgrades at some 129 CUNY facilities.  NYPA's financing of the completed energy efficiency projects at the City University amounts to nearly $92 million for annual savings on energy bills of more than $13 million and lowering of greenhouse gas emissions of nearly 85,000 tons a year.

 

"The Power Authority and CUNY are effective partners for investing in new clean energy technologies for lowering electric bills and stemming climate-changing greenhouse gas emissions," Iris Weinshall, CUNY Vice Chancellor for Facilities Planning, Construction and Management, said. "The City University is a recognized leader for energy efficiency and clean energy development, and we're dedicated to build upon the momentum of these fiscally sound efforts.  The recently completed project at CSI crystallizes the benefits." News Index

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CSIrecycle
College of Staten Island Ranks 6th in National Recyclemania Contest

 

The College of Staten Island recycled almost 260,000 lbs of material during a eight-week period from January to April this year as it participated in Recyclemania, an annual inter-university contest designed to encourage the recycling of multiple materials and raise awareness among students and staff of the value of recycling. The event mobilized students, faculty and staff and has had a positive impact on recycling behavior at the College.

 

During participation in the 'Competition Division' category, one of a series of competition categories open to Recyclemania Participants, CSI was up against 288 schools from around the country. The Competition division is a combination of both the Per Capita Classics and the Waste Minimization, which based on their combined results, demonstrate the greatest achievement in both source reduction and recycling. Entrants, typically colleges with a large residential student population, compete to capture and recycle the largest gross tonnage of materials possible, including paper, cardboard, bottles & cans over the period of the contest. CSI ranked 6th when measured against colleges nationwide. Over the eight weeks, CSI's recycling rate - the ratio of regular trash to recycled waste - was 60%. CSI was the only CUNY College participating in this year's Recyclemania contest .

News Index

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York  

York Continues Green Movement 

 

Along with a robust recycling program, York College is in the process of upgrading the roof of its 48,000 square-foot gymnasium with energy-efficient roofing material and improving energy efficiency throughout the college, such as the installation of wall washes to accentuate walk areas in the winter months.

 

These automatically turn off in the spring and summer months when daylight is more protracted. Lights in the parking lots -- and other areas not in use from mid-night to 5 am -- are also timed to conserve throughout the year; and elevator and escalator services are strategically suspended in the ongoing effort to conserve resources.

 

As a result of these endeavors, the college recently received a large rebate from the New York Power Authority. This past spring also saw the prolific distribution of evergreens on the college's large plaza and elsewhere. News Index

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ecoambassadars
Student Opportunity: EPA OnCampus ecoAmbassadors


Are you interested in the environment? Do you want to get more involved with the EPA and sustainability efforts on your campus? Be an EPAOnCampus ecoAmbassador!

Students can choose from a variety of events and projects, all of which are based on projects from EPA program offices and utilize EPA resources to help students plan their environmental activities. Past ecoAmbassadors have improved recycling efforts, organized Earth Day celebrations, initiated composting programs and certified campus buildings as Energy Star compliant. To get involved, students select an activity and a professor or administrator as their school sponsor, register their project or activity online, then organize their event and report their results.

In particular, students benefit by greening their campuses and developing valuable leadership and project management skills. The most active ecoAmbassadors will have the opportunity to interact with EPA employees at the Regional offices, Headquarters, and lab facilities.

Registration begins on September 1st and any individual or student organization can participate. Students must register their events on our website. Check out our website and Facebook page for more information! News Index 

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Sustainable CUNY

SCUNY ChairsTria Case  
University Director of Sustainability 

Will Cunningham  
CUNY SustainableWorks Associate

Amy Flannery  
Sustainability and Productivity Associate

Noah Ginsberg  
NYC Solar Ombudsman 

Tracy Handler  
CUNY SustainableWorks Associate  

Rosanne Hoyem  
NYC Solar Ombudsman

Alison Kling  
NYC Solar Coordinator

Ryan Peck  
NYC Solar Ombudsman 
 
Kitty Preston  
Environmental and Productivity Liaison

Jillian Puszykowski 
CUNY SustainableWorks Associate

Laurie Reilly  
Communications  

Neil Richardson
Project Manager